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This is a simple program which is trying to implement a boundary-fill algorithm. As an example, it will try to fill a green rectangle with the color blue and leave everything else intact.

What is the problem with this program?

Here this is the picture before applying the algorithm : enter image description here This is the picture while the algorithm is being applied. As you can clearly see the algorithm/application is stuck at one place!

enter image description here

And this is the source code:

#include <iostream>
#include <glut.h>

using namespace std;
bool b = false;
void init(void)
{
    glClearColor(1.0,0.0,0.0,0.0); 
    glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION);
    gluOrtho2D(0.0,1366.0,0.0,768.0);
}

bool getpixelcolor(GLint x, GLint y)
{
    unsigned char pick_col[3];
    float r,g,b;
    glReadPixels(x , y , 1 , 1 , GL_RGB , GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE , pick_col);

    r = pick_col[0]/255.0;
    g = pick_col[1]/255.0;
    b = pick_col[2]/255.0;

    //cout<<"b:"<<b<<"\r\n";
    if ( (r != 1 )&&( b != 1 )&&( g == 1 ) )//g==1
    {
        return true;
    }
    else    
    {
        return false;
    }
}

void PutPoint( int x, int y ) 
{
    glBegin (GL_POINTS);
    glColor3f (1.0,1.0,1.0);
    glVertex2i (x,y);
    glEnd();

    glFlush();
    glPointSize(1);
    glBegin (GL_POINTS);
    glColor3f (0.0,0.0,1.0);
    glVertex2i (x,y);
    glEnd();
    glFlush();
}

void Filling(int x,int y)
{
    bool Value = getpixelcolor(x,y);
    if (Value==true)
    {
        PutPoint(x, y);
        Filling (x+1,y);
        Filling (x-1,y);
        Filling (x,y+1);
        Filling (x,y-1);
    }
}
void displayfnc()
{
    if (b==false)
    {
    glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT);
        b=true;
        glColor3f(0.0,1.0,0.0);
        glRecti(100,100,200,200);
        glFlush();
        Filling(180,180);
    }

}
void Timer(int extra)
{
    glutPostRedisplay();
    glutTimerFunc(30,Timer,0);
}
int  main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    glutInit(&argc, argv);
    glutInitDisplayMode(GLUT_SINGLE | GLUT_RGB);
    glutInitWindowSize(1366,768);
    glutInitWindowPosition(0, 0);
    glutCreateWindow("BoundaryFill");
    init();
    glutDisplayFunc(displayfnc);
    glutTimerFunc(10,Timer,0);
    glutMainLoop();
    return 0;
}
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closed as too localized by Jefffrey, Peter Wood, Mario, Gabriele Petronella, A. Rodas Apr 7 '13 at 22:45

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is the program you need : There are two methods which you can use.
I think method 2 is what you and other people need too for boundary 4 fill algorithm.

Method 1:

    #include <iostream>
    #include <glut.h>

    using namespace std;
    bool b=true,c=true;
    bool A[50][50]={false};
    void init(void)
    {
        glClearColor(1.0,0.0,0.0,0.0); 
        glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION);
        gluOrtho2D(0.0,100.0,0.0,100.0);
    }

    bool getpixelcolor(GLint x, GLint y)
    {
        unsigned char pick_col[3];
        glReadPixels(x , y , 1 , 1 , GL_RGB , GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE , pick_col);
        float r,g,b;
        r = pick_col[0]/255.0;
        g = pick_col[1]/255.0;
        b = pick_col[2]/255.0;

        if ((r!=1)&&(b!=1)&&(g==1))g==1
        {

            return true;
        }
        else    
        {
            return false;
        }
    }

    void PutPoint( int x, int y ) 
    {

        glPointSize(2);
        glBegin (GL_POINTS);
        glColor3f (0.0,0.0,1.0);
        glVertex2i (x,y);
        glEnd();
        glFlush();

    }

    void Filling(int x,int y)
    {
        if (A[x][y]==b&&x<50&&y<50&&x>10&&y>10)
        {
            A[x][y]=c;
            PutPoint(x, y);
            Filling (x+1,y);
            Filling (x-1,y);
            Filling (x,y+1);
            Filling (x,y-1);
        }

    }
    void displayfnc()
    {
            glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT);
            if(b==false)
            {b=true;
             c=false;
            }
            else
                {b=false;
             c=true;
            }

            glColor3f(0.0,1.0,0.0);
            glRecti(10,50,10,50);
            Filling(40,40);

            glFlush();

    }
    int  main(int argc, char** argv)
    {

        glutInit(&argc, argv);
        glutInitDisplayMode(GLUT_SINGLE | GLUT_RGB);
        glutInitWindowSize(100,100);
        glutInitWindowPosition(0, 0);
        glutCreateWindow("BoundaryFill");
        init();
        glutDisplayFunc(displayfnc);
        glutMainLoop();
        return 0;
    }

Method 2:

    #include <iostream>
    #include <glut.h>

    using namespace std;
    unsigned char pick_col[50][50][3];
    void init(void)
    {
        glClearColor(1.0,0.0,0.0,0.0); 
        glMatrixMode(GL_PROJECTION);
        gluOrtho2D(0.0,100.0,0.0,100.0);
    }

    void readAllToBuffer( GLint _start, GLint  _end ) 
    {

        for (int i=_start;i<_end;i++)
        {
            for (int j=_start;j<_end;j++)
            {
                glReadPixels(i , j , 1 , 1 , GL_RGB , GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE , pick_col[i][j]);
            }
        }
    }

    bool getpixelcolor(GLint x, GLint y)
    {
        int r,g,b;
        r = pick_col[x][y][0];
        g = pick_col[x][y][1];
        b = pick_col[x][y][2];

        //cout<<"b:"<<b<<"\r\n";
        if ((r!=255)&&(b!=255)&&(g==255))//g==1
        {
            return true;
        }
        else    
        {
            return false;
        }
    }

    void PutPoint( int x, int y ) 
    {
         pick_col[x][y][0]=0;
         pick_col[x][y][1]=0;
         pick_col[x][y][2]=255;
        glPointSize(2);
        glBegin (GL_POINTS);
        glColor3f (0.0,0.0,1.0);
        glVertex2i (x,y);
        glEnd();
        glFlush();

    }

    void Filling(int x,int y)
    {
        bool Value=getpixelcolor(x,y);
        if (Value==true)
        {
            PutPoint(x, y);

            Filling (x+1,y);
            Filling (x-1,y);
            Filling (x,y+1);
            Filling (x,y-1);
        }
    }
    void displayfnc()
    {   glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT);

            glColor3f(0.0,1.0,0.0);
            glRecti(0,0,50,50);
            glFlush();
            readAllToBuffer(0, 49);
            Filling(40,40);
            glFlush();

    }
    void Timer(int extra)
    {
        glutPostRedisplay();
        glutTimerFunc(30,Timer,0);
    }
    int  main(int argc, char** argv)
    {

        glutInit(&argc, argv);
        glutInitDisplayMode(GLUT_SINGLE | GLUT_RGB);
        glutInitWindowSize(100,100);
        glutInitWindowPosition(0, 0);
        glutCreateWindow("BoundaryFill");
        init();
        glutDisplayFunc(displayfnc);
        //glutTimerFunc(10,Timer,0);
        glutMainLoop();
        return 0;
    }
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First of, you shouldn't peek and poke pixels in OpenGL with glReadPixels/glBegin(GL_POINTS) – it's as slow as it can get. If you want to implement flood fill on the CPU, read back the whole image and do it on CPU memory.

One of your biggest problems is this though:

r = pick_col[0]/255.0;
g = pick_col[1]/255.0;
b = pick_col[2]/255.0;

if ( (r != 1 )&&( b != 1 )&&( g == 1 ) )

Never perform an equality test on floats! Honestly, in my opinion compilers should emit a big fat warning, or maybe even an error if you do a == or a != on floats. Floating point numbers are always associated with a margin of error and when you compare floating points for equality in the majority of cases they will compare as nonequal (even if they're only apart by a very small epsilon > 0), its in their nature.

Why don't you just test on nice, exactly defined, error free integers?

uint8_t r,g,b;
/* ... */
if ( (r != 0xff) && ( b != 0xff )&& ( g == 0xff ) )

An issue you may run in is, if you got full screen antialiasing (FSAA) enabled. In that case the points you're poking may get antialiased, resulting in the pixels colors being set not exactly to the values you specify, in which case your flood fill algorithm will fail. Maybe add some margin/threshold. Or do the reasonable thing and take control over how values are put into memory, by doing it yourself, i.e. read back the whole picture to CPU memory, do your flood fill, and upload it into a OpenGL texture and splat it on the framebuffer.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much,But how am i supposed to do that if i am not going to use the aforementioned statement in opengl,honestly i have no idea what you are telling me by doing the flood fill using cpu in memory and then upload into opengl texture! sorry i'm a noob on opengl. –  Hossein Apr 7 '13 at 15:17
    
and my big roblem is when i read the pixel is green ..it shows me pixel is green and when i draw that pixel with blue and read it again i didnet say it pixel is blue...i want to know why it dosent show second pxel drawing (background color is red ,first color is green, and second is blue) –  Hossein Apr 7 '13 at 15:54
1  
@Hossein: Read the whole picture into a large buffer (i.e. glReadPixels with width and height > 1), then do all the pixel manipulations on that buffer. Also OpenGL is not meant to be used as a pixel manipulation API; doing that is terribly inefficient. –  datenwolf Apr 7 '13 at 16:45
    
:Got it working Thanks a million :) –  Hossein Apr 7 '13 at 20:21
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My first suggestion is to read the whole display image into a local memory, this so you do not need to do a lot of OpenGL calls. Then build up a new image locally and then push that to the display.

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1. The is no glutSwapBuffers() which is essential for seeing something.

2. You don't have to flush the pipeline with glFlush(), even not before glutSwapBuffers()

3. Drawing/Reading pixel by pixel is slow as hell, use either textures or some clever polygon drawing magic.

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Why do you make r,g,b floats?

I would change this all function to:

bool getpixelcolor(GLint x, GLint y)
{
    unsigned char pick_col[3];
    glReadPixels(x , y , 1 , 1 , GL_RGB , GL_UNSIGNED_BYTE , pick_col);

    if ( (pick_col[0] != 255 )&&( pick_col[1] != 255 )&&( pick_col[2] == 255 ) )//g==1
    {
        return true;
    }
    else    
    {
        return false;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
tanx but it doesnt change anything! –  Hossein Apr 7 '13 at 15:18
    
I only fixed what I know (: –  Roee Gavirel Apr 7 '13 at 15:22
    
tanx again bro :) –  Hossein Apr 7 '13 at 20:21
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