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I'm calling grep in java to separately count the number of a list words in a corpus.

BufferedReader fb = new BufferedReader(
 new InputStreamReader(   
  new FileInputStream("french.txt"), "UTF8"));

while ((l = fb.readLine()) != null){
String lpt = "\\b"+l+"\\b";
String[] args = new String[]{"grep","-ic",lpt,corpus};
Process grepCommand = Runtime.getRuntime().exec(args);
grep.waitFor()
}
BufferedReader grepInput = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(grep.getInputStream()));
int tmp = Integer.parseInt(grepInput.readLine());
System.out.println(l+"\t"+tmp);

This works well for my English word-list and corpus. But I also have a French word list and corpus. It doesn't work for french and a sample output on java console looks like this:

� bord      0
� c�t�      0

correct form: "à bord" and "à côté".

Now my question is: where is the problem? Should I fix my java code, or it's a grep issue? If so how do I fix it. (I also can't see french characters on my terminal correctly even though I changed the encoding to UTF-8).

share|improve this question
1  
Why not use the Java regex engine? –  Boris the Spider Apr 7 '13 at 11:38
    
Are you sure your file is actually encoded in UTF-8? More likely it is ISO-8859-1 or ISO-8859-15 or something similar. –  Mark Rotteveel Apr 7 '13 at 11:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I would suggest that you read the file line by line then call split on the word boundary to get the number of words.

public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
    final File file = new File("myFile");
    try (final BufferedReader bufferedReader =
            new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(new FileInputStream(file), "UTF-8"))) {
        String line;
        while ((line = bufferedReader.readLine()) != null) {
            final String[] words = line.split("\\b");
            System.out.println(words.length + " words in line \"" + line + "\".");
        }
    }
}

This avoids calling grep from you program.

The odd characters you are getting may well be do to with using the wrong encoding. Are you sure your file is in "UTF-8"?

EDIT

OP wants to read one file line-by-line and then search for occurrences of the read line in another file.

This can still be done more easily using java. Depending on how big your other file is you can either read it into memory first and search it or search it line-by-line also

A simple example reading the file into memory:

public static void main(String[] args) throws UnsupportedEncodingException, IOException {
    final File corpusFile = new File("corpus");
    final String corpusFileContent = readFileToString(corpusFile);
    final File file = new File("myEngramFile");
    try (final BufferedReader bufferedReader =
            new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(new FileInputStream(file), "UTF-8"))) {
        String line;
        while ((line = bufferedReader.readLine()) != null) {
            final int matches = countOccurencesOf(line, corpusFileContent);
        };
    }
}

private static String readFileToString(final File file) throws IOException {
    final StringBuilder stringBuilder = new StringBuilder();
    try (final FileChannel fc = new RandomAccessFile(file, "r").getChannel()) {
        final ByteBuffer byteBuffer = ByteBuffer.allocate(4096);
        final CharsetDecoder charsetDecoder = Charset.forName("UTF-8").newDecoder();
        while (fc.read(byteBuffer) > 0) {
            byteBuffer.flip();
            stringBuilder.append(charsetDecoder.decode(byteBuffer));
            byteBuffer.reset();
        }
    }
    return stringBuilder.toString();
}

private static int countOccurencesOf(final String countMatchesOf, final String inString) {
    final Matcher matcher = Pattern.compile("\\b" + countMatchesOf + "\\b").matcher(inString);
    int count = 0;
    while (matcher.find()) {
        ++count;
    }
    return count;
}

This should work fine if your "corpus" file is less than a hundred megabytes or so. Any bigger and you will want to change the "countOccurencesOf" method to something like this

private static int countOccurencesOf(final String countMatchesOf, final File inFile) throws IOException {
    final Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("\\b" + countMatchesOf + "\\b");
    int count = 0;
    try (final BufferedReader bufferedReader =
            new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(new FileInputStream(inFile), "UTF-8"))) {
        String line;
        while ((line = bufferedReader.readLine()) != null) {
            final Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(line);
            while (matcher.find()) {
                ++count;
            }
        };
    }
    return count;
}

Now you would just pass your "File" object into the method rather than the stringified file.

Note that the streaming approach reads files line-by-line and hence drops the linebreaks, you need to add them back before parsing the String if your Pattern relies on them being there.

share|improve this answer
    
what I need is the counts of n-gram in a corpus, for any given n-gram being read from a different file (fb). You are right the odd characters were due to the file encoding. –  mani Apr 8 '13 at 11:18

The problem is in your design. Do not call grep from java. Use pure java implementation instead: read file line by line and implement your own "grep" using pure java API.

But seriously I believe that the problem is in your shell. Did you try to run grep manually and filter French characters? I believe it will not work for you. It depends on your shell configuration and therefore depends on platform. Java can provide platform independent solution. To achieve this you should avoid as much as it is possible using non-pure-java techniques including executing command line utilities.

BTW code that reads line-by-line your file and uses String.contains() or pattern matching for lines filtering even shorter than code that runs grep.

share|improve this answer
    
i agree, maybe not String.contains(), but I think pattern matching is a good idea. It might even be faster as calling ggrep takes a lot of time. However I still have the same problem while showing the results on java console –  mani Apr 7 '13 at 16:43
    
Turns out it's really much slower to implement the whole thing in java, on my huge corpus –  mani Apr 8 '13 at 11:15

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