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I have a situation, which I will try to greatly simplify, in which a method on an object should create a new persistent object of a different class. How can I do this while maintaining repository ignorance and encapsulation at the same time?

In this example, we have widgets and containers of widgets. When a widget is sold or purchased, a WidgetEvent is created (somewhere else) and added to the list of WidgetEvents for the container. We can always query the container for the number of pieces on hand by summing the collection of WidgetEvents.At some point, a worker calls and says the container is empty even though there should still be some widgets in the container. In that case, we call the "SetComplete" method which creates a final WidgetEvent to zero out the container.

public class TestContext : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<WidgetEvent> WidgetEvents { get; set; }
    public DbSet<WidgetContainer> WidgetContainers { get; set; }
}

public class WidgetEvent
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public int Amount {get;set;}
    public WidgetContainer Container {get;set;}
}

public class WidgetContainer 
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<WidgetEvent> WidgetEvents {get;set;}

    public int GetPiecesOnHand()
    {
        return WidgetEvents.Sum(a=> a.Amount);
    }

    public void SetComplete()
    {
        if (GetPiecesOnHand() != 0)
        {

            WidgetEvents.Add(new WidgetEvent() { Amount = -GetPiecesOnHand() });
        }
    }
}

It seems to me that proper encapsulation would keep the creation of this event within the class definition. It makes it more understandable to someone reading the code. But I also see there is no way to make this new WidgetEvent persistent without introducing some repository knowledge into the class.

How should I do this? You can assume that I have a Factory for the WidgetEvents somewhere else. In case you were wondering, SaveChanges does not realize that the WidgetEvent has been created.

Edit: This returns 25 25 0 0 which is correct. I guess this leaves me a bit confused about track changes, but its good to know this works. I did something like this a couple of days ago and thought it did not work.

        using (var context = new TestContext())
        {
            WidgetContainer acontainer = new WidgetContainer();
            acontainer.WidgetEvents = new List<WidgetEvent>();
            context.WidgetContainers.Add(acontainer);
            acontainer.WidgetEvents.Add(new WidgetEvent() { Container = acontainer, Amount = 25 });
            Console.WriteLine(acontainer.GetPiecesOnHand());
            context.SaveChanges();
        }

        using (var context = new TestContext())
        {
            WidgetContainer acontainer = context.WidgetContainers.Find(1);
            Console.WriteLine(acontainer.GetPiecesOnHand());
            acontainer.SetComplete();
            Console.WriteLine(acontainer.GetPiecesOnHand());
            context.SaveChanges();
        }

        using (var context = new TestContext())
        {
            WidgetContainer acontainer = context.WidgetContainers.Find(1);
            Console.WriteLine(acontainer.GetPiecesOnHand());

        }
share|improve this question
    
How about having an event in the caller and having the class which actually creates the WidgetEvent subscribe to that event with a deligate? Deligates are the "loosest" form of coupling there is. –  Elad Lachmi Apr 7 '13 at 12:54
    
I thought about this, but it seemed a bit too wordy. I think it would work. –  James McClatchey Apr 7 '13 at 17:15

1 Answer 1

It should actually work if the WidgetContainer is attached to (=tracked by) the Entity Framework context without giving the class a reference to a context (or a repository).

For example a code like this...

var widgetContainer = context.WidgetContainers.Find(1);
// or:
// var widgetContainer = context.WidgetContainers.Create();
// widgetContainer.Id = 1;
// context.WidgetContainers.Attach(widgetContainer);

widgetContainer.SetComplete();
context.SaveChanges();

...should insert the new WidgetEvent into the database with a foreign key relationship to the widgetContainer because EF change tracking will recognize the new event that has been added to the WidgetEvents collection when SaveChanges is called.

The important piece is that the widgetContainer must be attached to the context before SetComplete is called.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, I know I tried something like this a few days ago and it did not see the change, but I must have made something different because I just tried what you suggested and it worked. –  James McClatchey Apr 7 '13 at 17:06

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