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My app has a broadcast receiver which listens for incoming sms but there is no persistent service.

I think the broadcast receiver is killed when the system is low on memory like when app is forced stop from android setting. I have noticed it after one day on my own phone.

Does android kill broadcast receivers on system low memory?

Is there anyway to enable them again after this?

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My app has a broadcast receiver which listens for incoming sms but there is no persistent service.

That is fine. There should not be a persistent service in most Android apps.

I think the broadcast receiver is killed when the system is low on memory

Not those registered via <receiver> elements in the manifest.

like when app is forced stop from android setting

Talented programmers realize that "Force Stop" has nothing to do with "killed when the system is low on memory". On Android 3.1+, "Force Stop" will block all broadcast receivers from being used until the user manually runs an activity again. But, again, when your process is "killed when the system is low on memory", Android does not do the same thing as what happens when you tap the "Force Stop" button.

Does android kill broadcast receivers on system low memory?

Not those registered via <receiver> elements in the manifest.

So in all scenarios that an app need to run all the time, a service must accompany it to enable broadcast receivers again.

Of course not. What is required is for you to stop pressing the "Force Stop" button. If you wish to simulate your process being terminated due to low memory conditions, use something else (e.g., swipe the app off the recent-tasks list on Android 4.0+).

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I have registered receivers in manifest but they stop responding after some time on android 4, so what is the problem? – Ali Apr 7 '13 at 15:35
    
What's your idea about Deepak Bala response? – Ali Apr 7 '13 at 15:38
    
@Ali: "What's your idea about Deepak Bala response?" -- much of it is incorrect. Manifest-registered broadcast receivers are not affected by low memory conditions. Alarms do not survive a Force Stop. Having a "long-running service" is an anti-pattern on Android, causing users to specifically use Force Stop to get rid of such apps. – CommonsWare Apr 7 '13 at 15:43
    
@Ali: ""I have registered receivers in manifest but they stop responding after some time on android 4, so what is the problem?" -- only the Force Stop button should cause a manifest-registered receiver to stop working. You are welcome to publish a sample app that demonstrates otherwise. It may be that your receiver is getting control, but what you are trying to do in that receiver has issues after a period of time. – CommonsWare Apr 7 '13 at 15:46
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@Ali: "Does your proposed scenario apply to android 2.2 and 2.3?" -- yes. "I use package manager to enable and disable the receivers inside the app, may it cause the problem?" -- if there is a bug, and you fail to enable the receiver when you think you are, then yes. Otherwise, that should be fine. – CommonsWare Apr 7 '13 at 16:20

If the app is force stopped or killed due to low memory, then yes the broadcast receiver will also be affected.

Once you return from onReceive(), the BroadcastReceiver is no longer active, and its hosting process is only as important as any other application components that are running in it. This is especially important because if that process was only hosting the BroadcastReceiver (a common case for applications that the user has never or not recently interacted with), then upon returning from onReceive() the system will consider its process to be empty and aggressively kill it so that resources are available for other more important processes.

This means that for longer-running operations you will often use a Service in conjunction with a BroadcastReceiver to keep the containing process active for the entire time of your operation.

When your app is restarted, register the receiver once more from the onResume() method. Unregister it on the onPause() method of your activity. For long running operations, use a Service.

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So, It's required to have a service to keep a broadcast receiver alive all the time? – Ali Apr 7 '13 at 13:39
    
Does it apply to alarms which triggers a broadcast receiver which are used in widgets? – Ali Apr 7 '13 at 13:39
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Alarms should survive anything since they don't really occupy memory. As for background Services I've seen them killed on low memory. They are still the way to go to run long running tasks, but beyond a certain line the framework can decide to kill it. The usage of the Service is to aid long-running ops as opposed to increasing the lifetime of a receiver. In your case Alarm + Service + BroadcastReceiver should be a safe bet. – Deepak Bala Apr 7 '13 at 13:46
    
The alarm may survive but the broadcast receiver which receives the alarm may be killed as you said. So in all scenarios that an app need to run all the time, a service must accompany it to enable broadcast receivers again. Thank you so much – Ali Apr 7 '13 at 13:49

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