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I was recently been hacked and hackers retrieved all my mailing_list data and I wondered how did they passed the "Validate_email" function and managed to do sql injection?

this is my code:

function validate_email($address)
{
            return (ereg('^[-!#$%&\'*+\\./0-9=?A-Z^_`a-z{|}~]+'. '@'. '[-!#$%&\'*+\\/0-9=?A-Z^_`a-z{|}~]+\.' . '[-!#$%&\'*+\\./0-9=?A-Z^_`a-z
{|}~]+$', $address));
}

if (empty($_REQUEST['email']) || !validate_email($_REQUEST['email'])) {
    die('INVALID EMAIL');
}

mysql_query("
    REPLACE INTO mailing_list
    SET email='".strtolower($_REQUEST['email'])."'
") or die('Unable to insert email to database');

die(header('Location: http://www.***'));

I was wondering how they did it with the validate email function.. and if this is the place they managed to hacked really or i'm just mistaking and I need to search more..

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closed as too localized by Quentin, vascowhite, Ash Burlaczenko, hjpotter92, Mario Apr 7 '13 at 21:23

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Just don't use mysql_query. At all. Use prepared statements instead. –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 7 '13 at 13:46
1  
mysql_query can be used with prepared statements as well –  Your Common Sense Apr 7 '13 at 13:47
    
I know its a really old code.. I was just wondering how they hacked this one if i'm using preg_replace, what string did they use? and to see if it's really here where they managed stole all of my database data. –  Dan Revah Apr 7 '13 at 13:52
    
How you are too sure they stole data by exploiting this function? It seems you have more security hole in your application. If you wish you can give us access to your site to testing. Normally if the validate email function do not create a backdoor, they can't stole data with it. I can garantee you. Thanks –  user2193789 Apr 7 '13 at 15:15

4 Answers 4

You are allowing ' in e-mail addresses. While this might be valid in an e-mail address, it is not a good idea to allow it in the mysql_query. Replace the query with this:

mysql_query("
   REPLACE INTO mailing_list
   SET email='".mysql_real_escape_string(strtolower($_REQUEST['email']))."'
   ") or die('Unable to insert email to database');

For the future, consider switching to prepared statements, as these are much safer regarding SQL injections.

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2  
You can write the same secure/insecure statements with both mysql_query+mysql_real_escape_string and prepared statements. The key is to know why SQL injections occur. –  Gumbo Apr 7 '13 at 13:52
    
@Gumbo: The key is really to always use bound parameters. Then SQL injection becomes an irrelevancy. –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 7 '13 at 13:54
    
True. The bad news is that there are no libraries (beside my own) that let's you always use bound parameters. –  Your Common Sense Apr 7 '13 at 14:00
1  
always use bound parameters: that may not always be possible - for example, if one needs table names or, more commonly, column names as input (stackoverflow.com/a/8314141/347934). –  MvanGeest Apr 7 '13 at 14:07
    
@MvanGeest: Sure, but using user input directly as a table name isn't a good idea anyway. (Perhaps a better way to phrase this is "never construct queries by concatenating with user input"...) –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 7 '13 at 14:10

its because you did not used mysql_real_escape_string

instead of directly going to use the $_REQUEST['email']

$email = mysql_real_escape_string($_REQUEST['email']);
mysql_query("
REPLACE INTO mailing_list
SET email='".strtolower($email)."'
") or die('Unable to insert email to database');
share|improve this answer
    
mysql_real_escape_string is not a magical wand makes your data safe, but the phrasing implies that –  Your Common Sense Apr 7 '13 at 13:49

something like entering the following as an email address...

a@a.com';select * from mailing_list;
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3  
Oh please, please try it first yourself –  Your Common Sense Apr 7 '13 at 14:01
1  
This is the only one that actually answers the question. –  Ash Burlaczenko Apr 7 '13 at 14:03
    
@Randy Already tried that, didn't work still getting Invalid Email. –  Dan Revah Apr 7 '13 at 14:05
1  
mysql_query doesn’t allow multiple statements. –  Gumbo Apr 7 '13 at 14:21
2  
even if it was, just select to nowhere will no good to attacker anyway - there is no output either –  Your Common Sense Apr 7 '13 at 14:22

A Golden Rule Of Protection:

Data validation should never be used to substitute SQL data formatting.

Your query have to be properly formatted despite of whatever validations that has been (or has not been) performed.

if this is the place they managed to hacked really or i'm just mistaking and I need to search more..

Nevertheless, this query is scarcely could be the cause of stolen emails. So, you have to watch somewhere else. Judging by this code, there are many other weak spots.

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I can't see an answer to his question here. –  Ash Burlaczenko Apr 7 '13 at 14:02

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