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I found a interesting quize today about gcc http://ridiculousfish.com/blog/posts/will-it-optimize.html

How come this code

int factorial(int x) {
   if (x > 1) return x * factorial(x-1);
   else return 1;
}

can be translated by compiler into

int factorial(int x) {
   int result = 1;
   while (x > 1) result *= x--;
   return result;
}

Also optimizing strlen() by default is really bizarre for me. What if other thread modifies the string?

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closed as not a real question by Pascal Cuoq, Peter Wood, thaJeztah, Griwes, Gabriele Petronella Apr 7 '13 at 21:36

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I dont really understand what question you are asking (related to the factorial) –  Cristiano Sousa Apr 7 '13 at 14:24
    
How gcc can translate non-tail-recursive function into a loop. –  lukas Apr 7 '13 at 14:27
    
One question = one question, why ask two in one? -.-" –  Griwes Apr 7 '13 at 21:35
    
I agree on the one question bit. If this question gets reopened, I suggest removing the strlen() part and asking that as a separate question. –  Joel Rondeau Apr 8 '13 at 14:06
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2 Answers 2

The compiler could transform that code into something tail-call optimisable by putting the multiplication before the recursive function call:

int factorial(int x) {
    return factorial_tail_call(x, 1);
}

int factorial_tail_call(int x, int result) {
    if (x > 1) return factorial_tail_call(x-1, result*x);
    return result;
}

By performing the evaluation of result*x before factorial_tail_call is called recursively, the compiler can determine that x and result are no longer needed. Hence, it can pop them from the stack. This forms proof that the stack doesn't need to grow.

Can you see any resemblance between the transformed-to code? The 1 is in the same place, the condition x > 1 is in the same place and return result; is in the same place. It's all just a different way of expressing the same algorithm, providing the compiler implements tail call optimisation. By moving the multiplication expression into an argument and putting in comments the code from your post to the right, you might be able to see some resemblance of functionality, and how the compiler managed to make the remainder of the transformation:

int factorial(int x) {
    return factorial_tail_call(x, 1);                     // int result = 1;
}

int factorial_tail_call(int x, int result) {
    if (x > 1) return factorial_tail_call(x-1, result*x); // while (x > 1) result *= x--;
    return result;                                        // return result;
}

§5.1.2.3p4 of n1570.pdf

In the abstract machine, all expressions are evaluated as specified by the semantics. An actual implementation need not evaluate part of an expression if it can deduce that its value is not used and that no needed side effects are produced (including any caused by calling a function or accessing a volatile object).

Compilers are smart things, written by far better programmers than most of us. If the compiler can figure out that two pieces of code are equivalent, then it can choose whichever of the two it wishes (with some restrictions, described in the quotation below). For example, it could replace a loop that calculates and prints the first thousand primes with a single printf expression.

§5.1.2.3p6 of n1570.pdf

The least requirements on a conforming implementation are:

— Accesses to volatile objects are evaluated strictly according to the rules of the abstract machine.

— At program termination, all data written into files shall be identical to the result that execution of the program according to the abstract semantics would have produced.

— The input and output dynamics of interactive devices shall take place as specified in 7.21.3. The intent of these requirements is that unbuffered or line-buffered output appear as soon as possible, to ensure that prompting messages actually appear prior to a program waiting for input.

This is the observable behavior of the program.

That's one reason why micro-optimisation is futile.

If another thread modifyies a string that strlen is processing, that's a race condition. Race conditions are undefined behaviour. You need to guard the string with a mutex to ensure this doesn't happen, or learn better multi-threading paradigms. Which book are you reading?

§5.1.2.4p25 of n1570.pdf

The execution of a program contains a data race if it contains two conflicting actions in different threads, at least one of which is not atomic, and neither happens before the other. Any such data race results in undefined behavior.

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1  
"far better programmers" isn't necessarily fair... Compilers are written by programmers who have specialised in compiler-writing! –  Oli Charlesworth Apr 7 '13 at 14:38
1  
Yes, and they know the C standard. They know what is well-defined and what isn't, far better than most who haven't written C compilers. –  undefined behaviour Apr 7 '13 at 14:43
1  
@OliCharlesworth I modified the generalisation: s/than us/than most of us/ to recognise that some of us are decent programmers, however rare that seems. –  undefined behaviour Apr 7 '13 at 14:58
    
It's ok, I'm not suggesting that I'm a better programmer than the GCC authors, or anything like that ;) It's more that compiler-writing is just one particular specialization, however magical they may seem... –  Oli Charlesworth Apr 7 '13 at 15:02
    
@OliCharlesworth I wouldn't suggest that. They're just so skilled at programming in multiple languages that they know how to write some automaton that translates from one language to another (hopefully by specification). They may also be skilled enough to know how to express that translation in ways that future optimisations can be exposed, but that comes from learning about general programming stuff like data structures and algorithms. I should probably add a mention of that to this answer. –  undefined behaviour Apr 7 '13 at 15:17
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You already know that gcc can optimize a tail-recursive function into a loop. The other thing that gcc can do (and is mentioned in your link) is try to optimize a non-tail-recursive function into a tail-recursive function.

Your factorial function is here:

int factorial(int x) {
   if (x > 1) return x * factorial(x-1);
   else return 1;
}

Now I'm going to try to make as few changes as possible and rewrite this as tail-recursive. First, I'll flip the if test:

int factorial(int x) {
   if (!(x > 1)) return 1;
   else return x * factorial(x-1);
}

Next, I'll remove the unneeded else:

int factorial(int x) {
   if (!(x > 1)) return 1;
   return x * factorial(x-1);
}

This is almost tail-recursive, but it is returning x * factorial() and not just factorial(). The typical way to make this tail recursive is to include a second parameter, which is an accumulator.

int factorial(int x, int accumulator = 1) {
   if (!(x > 1)) return accumulator;
   return factorial(x - 1, x * accumulator);
}

Now this is a tail-recursive function, and it can be optimized into a loop.

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That's not tail-recursive, yet... –  undefined behaviour Apr 7 '13 at 14:48
2  
int factorial(int x, int result) { if (x > 1) return factorial(x - 1, result * x); return result; } // Now it's tail-recursive, because there is no need for x or result beyond the next entry to factorial, so gcc can pop both of those values from the stack before it enters factorial recursively. –  undefined behaviour Apr 7 '13 at 14:50
    
Excellent point. I'd modify my answer to mention that, but I think I'll just mod your answer up and wait for it to get accepted. –  Joel Rondeau Apr 7 '13 at 15:10
    
Updated now as I really hate leaving wrong answers up, but I liked the simple flow vs your more technical answer. –  Joel Rondeau Apr 7 '13 at 21:35
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