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I have a (string, object) dictionary, object (class) has some values including data type which is defined by enum. I need a GetItemValue method that should return dictionary item's value. So return type must be the type which is defined in item object.

Class Item
{
    String Name;
    DataValueType DataType;
    Object DataValue;
}

private Dictionary<string, Item> ItemList = new Dictionary<string, Item>();

void Main()
{
    int value;

    ItemList.Add("IntItem", new Item("IntItem", DataValueType.TInt, 123));
    value = GetItemValue("IntItem"); // value = 123
}

What kind of solution can overcome this problem?

Best Regards,

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4 Answers

You can use Generic Classes

Class Item<T>
{
    String Name;
    T DataTypeObject;
    Object DataValue;

    public T GetItemValue()
    { 
        //Your code
        return DataTypeObject;
    }
}
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A better solution would be to introduce an interface that you make all the classes implement. Note that the interface doesn't necessarily have to specify any behavior:

public interface ICanBePutInTheSpecialDictionary {
}

public class ItemTypeA : ICanBePutInTheSpecialDictionary {
    // code for the first type
}

public class ItemTypeB : ICanBePutInTheSpecialDictionary {
    // code for the second type
}
// etc for all the types you want to put in the dictionary

To put stuff in the dictionary:

var dict = new Dictionary<string, ICanBePutInTheSpecialDictionary>();

dict.add("typeA", new ItemTypeA());
dict.add("typeB", new ItemTypeB());

When you need to cast the objects to their specific types, you can either use an if-elseif-block, something like

var obj = dict["typeA"];
if (obj is ItemTypeA) {
    var a = obj as ItemTypeA;
    // Do stuff with an ItemTypeA. 
    // You probably want to call a separate method for this.
} elseif (obj is ItemTypeB) {
    // do stuff with an ItemTypeB
}

or use reflection. Depending on how many choices you have, either might be preferrable.

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If you have a 'mixed bag' you could do something like this...

class Item<T>
{
    public String Name { get; set; }
    public DataValueType DataType { get; set; }
    public T DataValue { get; set; }
}
class ItemRepository
{
    private Dictionary<string, object> ItemList = new Dictionary<string, object>();

    public void Add<T>(Item<T> item) { ItemList[item.Name] = item; }
    public T GetItemValue<T>(string key)
    {
        var item = ItemList[key] as Item<T>;
        return item != null ? item.DataValue : default(T);
    }
}

and use it like...

var repository = new ItemRepository();
int value;
repository.Add(new Item<int> { Name = "IntItem", DataType = DataValueType.TInt, DataValue = 123 });
value = repository.GetItemValue<int>("IntItem");

If you have just a couple types - you're better off with Repository<T>.

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I found a solution exactly what I want. Thanks to uncle Google. Thanks all of you for your kind interest.

 public dynamic GetValue(string name)
 {
     if (OpcDataList[name].IsChanged)
     {
         OpcReflectItem tmpItem = OpcDataList[name];
         tmpItem.IsChanged = false;
         OpcDataList[name] = tmpItem;
     }

     return Convert.ChangeType(OpcDataList[name].ItemValue.Value, OpcDataList[name].DataType);
 }
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You should just use object. –  leppie Apr 7 '13 at 18:35
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