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I have a class that implements Iterable, but with own hasNext() and next() methods like this:

public class BLMovie implements Iterable<BLMovieFrame> {

@Override
public Iterator<BLMovieFrame> iterator() {
    iteratorVar = 0;
    return liste.iterator();
}

public boolean hasNext() {
    if (loop)
        return true;
    return iteratorVar < liste.size();
}

public BLMovieFrame next() {
    iteratorVar = (iteratorVar++)%(liste.size()-1);
    return liste.get(iteratorVar);
}

public void remove() {
    throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
}

I'm pretty sure that's not the best way to do it,
the other threads about Iterable did not seem to be concerned with own next methods, so does someone have an advice for me?

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Do you really need to override hasnext() and next() methods? –  TheEwook Apr 7 '13 at 15:16
    
@TheEwook Yes because of the loop-attribute –  Big_Chair Apr 7 '13 at 15:22
    
@TheEwook Sorry it's a bit late, but I just thought about this and wondered: How could I NOT override those methods, since I must define a new iterator in iterator() anyways? I'd just have them in an inner class –  Big_Chair Apr 9 '13 at 21:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your methods are defined on the wrong class. The hasNext, next and remove methods need to be defined on the Iterator implementation, not on the Iterable. If you had placed an @Override annotation on each method the compiler would have informed you of this mistake.

As it is, you can either:

  • Create an anonymous inner class for your iterator, and move those methods into its body
  • Create a standalone class for the iterator, and once again, move those methods into it

Note that when you do this you will no longer be able to take advantage of the embedded list's iterator, but you will effectively be defining your own (though, you could wrap over it, of course).

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Ah you mean make an own iterator like BLMovieIterator and then return a new Object of this in the iterator() method? –  Big_Chair Apr 7 '13 at 15:20
    
Basically, yes .... –  Stephen C Apr 7 '13 at 15:21
    
@Big_Chair - yes, thats what I mean. –  Perception Apr 7 '13 at 15:24
    
The iterator class need not be implemented just as an anonymous inner class. You can also choose to implement it as a member class of BLMOvie, i.e. as an inner class or as a static nested class. The Java Tutorial has an example of one implemented as an inner class here (though without an Iterable interface): docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/innerclasses.html –  scottb Apr 7 '13 at 15:27

Actually you won't deal with your iterator methods since you're actually returning the iterator of your object liste.

If you want to implement your own iterator, the best way is to create an anonymous inner class.

    @Override
        public Iterator<BLMovieFrame> iterator() {
            // TODO Auto-generated method stub      
            return new Iterator <BLMovieFrame> (){

                @Override
                public boolean hasNext() {
                   if (loop)
                         return true;
                   return iteratorVar < liste.size();
              }

                @Override
                public BLMovieFrame next() {
                         iteratorVar = (iteratorVar++)%(liste.size()-1);
              return liste.get(iteratorVar);
              }
             @Override
            public void remove() {
                     throw new UnsupportedOperationException();
             }              
            };
share|improve this answer
    
Ok thank you for the example –  Big_Chair Apr 7 '13 at 15:24

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