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I have a memory leak I don't understand. I programmed a mechanism to handle event with semi-automatically unbinding which should allow me to clean up memory easily. But in one case, the clean up doesn't happen (I use chrome's "profile (memory heap)" to check for instances of "EventHandler" left). I really don't get why it happen. There's something weird with the closure...

see it in action with chrome

function Bind(obj, f) {
    return function() {
        return f.apply(obj, arguments);
    }
}

function EventHandler() {
    this.listeners = new Object();

    var _listenerID = 0;
    this.addListener = function(e, obj, listener, specialDisplay) {
        if (typeof(listener) === "function") {
            var listenerID = ++_listenerID;
            console.log("Events (" + (++EventHandler.All) + ", " + listenerID + ") ++" + e);

            if (!this.listeners.hasOwnProperty(e)) {
                this.listeners[e] = new Object();
            }
            this.listeners[e][listenerID] = listener;

            if (obj != null && typeof(obj.removeListener) == "function") {
                var deleteListenerID = obj.addListener("Delete", null, Bind(this, function() {
                    this.removeListener(e, listenerID);
                    obj.removeListener("Delete", deleteListenerID);
                }));
            }

            return listenerID;
        }

        return null;
    }
    this.fire = function(e, obj) {
        if (this.listeners.hasOwnProperty(e)) {
            for(var i in this.listeners[e]) {
                this.listeners[e][i](obj);
            }
        }
    }
    this.removeListener = function(e, listenerID) {
        if (this.listeners.hasOwnProperty(e) && this.listeners[e].hasOwnProperty(listenerID)) {
            delete this.listeners[e][listenerID];

            console.log("Events (" + (--EventHandler.All) + ", " + listenerID + ") --" + e);
        }
    }
}

EventHandler.All = 0;

function Loader() {
}

Loader.files = new Object();

Loader.LoadImage = function(src, f) {
    if (!Loader.files.hasOwnProperty(src)) {
        var handler = new EventHandler();

        console.log("Loading.... (" + src + ")");

        Loader.files[src] = function(fnct) {
            handler.addListener("ImageLoaded", handler, function(img) {
                fnct(img);
            });
        }

        handler.addListener("ImageLoaded", handler, function() {
            Loader.files[src] = function(fnct) {
                fnct(img);
            }
        });     

        var img = new Image();
        $(img).load(function() {
            console.log("Loaded.... (" + src + ")");
            handler.fire("ImageLoaded", img);
            handler.fire("Delete");
            $(img).unbind('load');
        });
        img.src = src;
    }

    Loader.files[src](f);
}

Loader.LoadImage("http://serge.snakeman.be/Demo/house.jpg", function() { alert("ok"); });
share|improve this question
    
Could you please do as the error message says and paste the code from jsfiddle to the question. Thanks. – Juhana Apr 7 '13 at 15:24
    
I really don't know what part of the code would be the more meaningful I was actually a bit disconcerted by the stackoverflow warning. – Serge Apr 7 '13 at 15:31
    
If somebody could upvote my question, I'll grant a 50 bounty for the answer... – Serge Apr 14 '13 at 15:14
    
I though 50 rep wxas sufficient, I just read it is 75. I guess I'll have to wait longer to get an answer. – Serge Apr 14 '13 at 15:46
1  
Doesn't you "Bind" method creates a new anonymous function everytime you call it. Thus, each time you add a listener, you add a new anonymous function as Listener. That disturbs me since theoritically the .removeListener method needs as parameters the target, and the listener function (the exact same object). Couldn't it be a first issue ? Furthermore you use "deleteListenerID" before initializing it no ? It's the function's return AND a variable used inside this same function – Ricola3D Apr 19 '13 at 14:55

While you are adding 'listeners' make sure you are removing it, if you are using the query for long time.

this.listeners = new Object();

or

this.listeners[e] = new Object();

this will add object to listener as array, but not removing them at any point.

This may be the reason for Memory Consumption. It may not leak, its assignment of objects. that consumes your RAM using browser. :)

share|improve this answer
    
I'm removing them. On to the console you can see "Events (0, 4) --Delete" which indicate the last remaining listener has been removed. – Serge Apr 23 '13 at 7:08
    
Its general practice when you are dealing with listeners in system. You need to handle them including removing them. The same apply to browser in some cases :) If you are removing them then its out of my reach. but for double check, check the element in console 'listeners[]'. Whether it have elements or not. – MarmiK Apr 23 '13 at 7:30
    
Adding object to the console, makes chrome hold another reference on them. But since you're just talking about the listeners[] is shouldn't hurt trying (I'll try this evening). – Serge Apr 23 '13 at 7:59

You create closures that hold a reference to an EventHandler instance via the handler variable. One of the closures remains after the image has been loaded:

    handler.addListener("ImageLoaded", handler, function() {
        Loader.files[src] = function(fnct) {
            fnct(img);
        }
    });     

It's the inner function function(fnct) {.... The instance of EventHandler cannot be freed as long as the closure exists. Your only solution is to get rid of that closure. Or you free the instance manually, if possible. The following might work for you:

handler.fire("Delete");
handler = undefined;

Chrome's memory profiler shows you the object's retaining tree, which is just another way to say "Who is holding a reference that object". In your example it's EventHandler <- handler (the variable of the LoadImage method as incorporated by the closure) <- house.jpg, which actually is Loader.files[src] and has the value function(fnct) { fnct(img); }.

share|improve this answer
    
When the image gets loaded the reference hold in Loader.files[src] is dropped since I set it to another value. Loader.files[src] = function(fnct) { fnct(img); } – Serge Apr 22 '13 at 10:23
    
You are right, of course, I missed that. But that does not change much: this function prevents the EventHandler instance from being released (says the profiler). I am not a 100% sure, but afaik as long as a function exists, that could reference the handler variable, the EventHandler instance won't be released. – zeroflagL Apr 22 '13 at 11:29
    
What do you suggest is made for the function not to exist anymore? I don't get where it could be hold anyway. :S – Serge Apr 22 '13 at 11:33
    
That should solve the problem. The thing is that you seem to need this function. It is called when Loader.LoadImage is called for an already loaded image. – zeroflagL Apr 22 '13 at 11:42
    
I'm not sure I'm getting your solution. Mind to write the full code, please? – Serge Apr 23 '13 at 7:05

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