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I am writing a program for a class. When I run the program the value for alphabet never sticks, and when I use toString() in my subclass, alphabet is always null. I know that in the second constructor this.alphabet equals what I want it to equal but after that it loses it's value. The weird part is that machineName keeps it's value. I'm still pretty new to java and stackoverflow so I'm sorry if I did something moronic. Also I cannot change the methods or variables I can only implement it.

public abstract class AbstractDFA{

private String machineName;
private String alphabet;   

public AbstractDFA(String nameofmachine)
{      
  StringBuilder b = new StringBuilder();
  for (int i = 0; nameofmachine.charAt(i) != '.'; i++)
  {
    b.append(nameofmachine.charAt(i));
  }
  machineName = b.toString();

}

public AbstractDFA(String nameofmachine, String alphabet)
{
  this.alphabet = alphabet;
  this.machineName = nameofmachine;
  setAlphabet(this.alphabet);
}

public String toString()
{
  return "Machine Name: " + machineName + "\nAlphabet: " + getAlphabet();;  
}

public void setAlphabet(String alpha)
{
  StringBuilder beta = new StringBuilder();
  beta.append("{");
  for (int i = 0; i < alpha.length(); i++)
  {
    beta.append(alpha.charAt(i));
    if (i != (alpha.length() - 1))
    {
      beta.append(", ");
    }
  }
  beta.append("}");
  alphabet = beta.toString();
}

public String getAlphabet()
{
  return alphabet;
}
}

public class DFA extends AbstractDFA{

public DFA(String fileName){
  super(fileName);
  readDFA(fileName);
}

public DFA(String name, String alpha, int numStates, int start, int[][] delta, boolean[] finalstates){
  super(name,alpha);
  this.numberOfStates = numStates;
  this.start = start;
  this.delta = delta;
  this.finalStates = finalstates;
}
}
share|improve this question
    
This is an abstract class. Is there code in the subclass that might be affecting what you're seeing? e.g. does one of your subclasses override setAlphabet? –  Mark Peters Apr 7 '13 at 16:37
    
Not as far as I know. I have edited the code to include the constructors from the sub-class. The only other times I access the abstract class are when I use super.getAlphabet() and when I use super.toString() to print out the name and alphabet. –  Michael Scott Apr 7 '13 at 16:49

2 Answers 2

this.alphabet = alphabet;
setAlphabet(this.alphabet);

What's the purpose of the first assignment to this.alphabet if you're just going to overwrite that field in setAlphabet anyway? Just this:

public AbstractDFA(String nameofmachine, String alphabet)
{
  this.machineName = nameofmachine;
  setAlphabet(alphabet);
}

would be much more clear.

If you were checking the value of this.alphabet after the first line, but before calling setAlphabet, then likely setAlphabet simply isn't working as you want it to.

share|improve this answer
    
That's a good point. For some reason I thought that by doing this.alphabet = alphabet; I was allowing variable alphabet to be used throughout the class. But you have a point. –  Michael Scott Apr 7 '13 at 16:36

You have two constructors to your abstract class, and the first one does not call the setAlphabet() method.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't see how it could call the setAlphabet() method. The alphabet variable has no value when it is in that constructor. –  Michael Scott Apr 7 '13 at 16:50
    
If you use the public AbstractDFA(String nameofmachine) constructor from you subclass (i.e. with super("some string"); in the superclass:es constructor), alphabet will never be initialized and hence null when toString() is called. If you want to provide a default alphabet you can simply declare it as private String alphabet = "abcd"; –  Theodor Apr 7 '13 at 17:01
    
Another way is to have the first constructor call the second constructor with this("some machine name", "some default alphabet") –  Theodor Apr 7 '13 at 17:04
    
Ah, ok thanks a lot. I will try that. –  Michael Scott Apr 7 '13 at 17:12
    
Don't forget to accept this answer if it did the trick. –  Theodor Apr 9 '13 at 8:42

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