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Simple curiosity, this code

    private const long constLong = 16;
    private static long instanceLong = 16;

    static long constTest()
    { 
        long i = 4;
        return i + constLong;
    }

    static long instanceTest()
    {
        long i = 4;
        return i + instanceLong;
    }

produce this IL:

.field private static literal int64 constLong = int64(16)
.field private static int64 instanceLong

.method private hidebysig static int64 constTest () cil managed 
{
    // Method begins at RVA 0x2068
    // Code size 9 (0x9)
    .maxstack 2
    .locals init (
        [0] int64 i
    )

    IL_0000: ldc.i4.4
    IL_0001: conv.i8
    IL_0002: stloc.0
    IL_0003: ldloc.0
    IL_0004: ldc.i4.s 16
    IL_0006: conv.i8
    IL_0007: add
    IL_0008: ret
} // end of method Program::constTest

.method private hidebysig static int64 instanceTest () cil managed 
{
    // Method begins at RVA 0x2080
    // Code size 11 (0xb)
    .maxstack 2
    .locals init (
        [0] int64 i
    )

    IL_0000: ldc.i4.4
    IL_0001: conv.i8
    IL_0002: stloc.0
    IL_0003: ldloc.0
    IL_0004: ldsfld int64 ConsoleApplication1.Program::instanceLong
    IL_0009: add
    IL_000a: ret
} // end of method Program::instanceTest

Why does constTest() have ldc.i4.s?

    IL_0004: ldc.i4.s 16
    IL_0006: conv.i8

Instead of ldc.i8:

    IL_0004: ldc.i8 16

Because now the constTest() need to do a conv.i8.

Like I said, this is pure curiosity.

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4  
Your instanceLong variable if very confusingly named, given that it's still static... –  Jon Skeet Apr 7 '13 at 17:10
4  
The IL representation is shorter. –  CodesInChaos Apr 7 '13 at 17:10
    
@JonSkeet, I always had problem at naming variable, go ahead and put a better name :-) –  Fredou Apr 7 '13 at 17:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's more compact this way, see the labels for hints.

IL_0000: ldc.i4.4
IL_0001: conv.i8
IL_0002: stloc.0

This took one byte for ldc.i4.4 and one byte for conv.i8: two bytes total.

IL_0004: ldc.i4.s 16
IL_0006: conv.i8
IL_0007: add

That took two bytes for ldc.i4.s and 16 and one byte for the conv.i8: three bytes total.

And ldc.i8 16 would take one byte for the instruction and 4 bytes for the operand (16): total 5 bytes.

But keep in mind that shorter IL does not mean faster (or slower) native once once it will be JIT'ed (or AOT'ed).

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make sense, i changed constLong to long.MaxValue and now it look like this IL_0004: ldc.i8 9223372036854775807 and IL_000d: add –  Fredou Apr 7 '13 at 17:25

Remember that you are looking at the IL, not the final machine code. The object of IL is to capture code/programmer intent as closely as possible so that the JITTER can perform the best possible optimization.

If the JITTER was doing this there would be a concern, but there is no concern when the compiler does this.

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“capture code/programmer intent as closely as possible” But that doesn't explain the code in question. Because the closest representation is ldc.i8 16. –  svick Apr 7 '13 at 17:50
    
No, because it fits in a short and for SOME machine architectures that would be optimal; just not any you are considering using. So the compiler captures as much information as it can and lets the JITTER optimize the code for performance. –  Pieter Geerkens Apr 7 '13 at 17:57

The simple answer is 'that is the way the compiler produces the code'. You have to remember that the native code that is actually produced can run on 32- or 64-bit CPUs. The IL is compiled to the target instruction set and so:

  ldc.i4 4
  conv.i8

Could well become a single load on a 64-bit CPU.

share|improve this answer
    
I just tried compiling for x64, same il code –  Fredou Apr 7 '13 at 17:17
1  
@Fredou Rob is talking about the JIT-compiled native code (assembly), not the IL. –  svick Apr 7 '13 at 17:54

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