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I have been searching the forums and the JSON.NET website on this issue and from what I can see I'm correctly following the guidelines but it is not working correctly.

I'm trying to deserialize object from derived classes. Serializing works fine, but when deserializing it tries to deserialize in to the wrong type.

I'm trying to do this with Windows Phone 8 and JSON.NET 4.5.11

I have the following classes which I am serializing:

public class MyClass : ModelBase
{
    public string Title { get; set; }

    [JsonProperty(TypeNameHandling = TypeNameHandling.All)]
    public MyAction Action {get; set; }
}



public abstract class MyAction : ModelBase
{
    [JsonIgnore()]
    public abstract ActionType ActionType { get; }
    public abstract void Execute();
}

public class SettingsAction : MyAction 
{
    public override ActionType ActionType
    {
        get { return ActionType.Settings; }
    }

    public SettingsType SettingsType {get; set; }

    public override void Execute()
    {

    }
}

public class NoneAction : MyAction 
{
    public override ActionType ActionType
    {
        get { return ActionType.None; }
    }

    public override void Execute()
    {
        return;
    }
}

I serialize it like this:

MyClass obj = new MyClass 
{
    Action = new SettingsAction()
};

string json = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(
                obj, 
                Formatting.Indented, 
                new JsonSerializerSettings() { TypeNameHandling = TypeNameHandling.All });

using (StreamWriter writer = new StreamWriter(stream))
{
    writer.Write(json);
}

And it gives me the following JSON:

{
  "$type": "Model.MyClass, Model",
  "Title": null,
  "Action": {
    "$type": "Model.SettingsAction, Model",
    "SettingsType": 0
  }
}

As far as I can see, this is correct, I told it to include the type information and it's correctly included.

The I deserialize it like this:

using (StreamReader r = new StreamReader(stream))
{
    string json = r.ReadToEnd();
    MyClass obj = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<MyClass>(json);
}

And I get the following error:

JsonSerializationException: Error setting value to 'SettingsType' on 'Model.NoneAction'

So, although the type is contained in the JSON, on serializing it's ignoring it and of course deserializing it into a different type fails.

Does anyone have an idea why it's not taking the information into account and deserialize to the correct type?

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried using the same JsonSerializerSettings on your DeserializeObject call? – Brian Rogers Apr 7 '13 at 18:11
    
Yes, I tried that right after posting the question, but to no avail, still the same error. – Kenneth Apr 7 '13 at 18:13
    
What is <T> in DeserializeObject<T>? – Brian Rogers Apr 7 '13 at 18:26
    
I removed some of the details when posting the question and I forgot to take this out, but essentially it's just MyClass. I edited the code to make it clearer. – Kenneth Apr 7 '13 at 18:38
    
I've got it working in a plain console app running under Windows 7, using Json.Net v4.5.11 and .Net Framework v4.5. I had to make a couple of assumptions about the code since you do not have ModelBase, ActionType or SettingsType defined in your example above. I also took out the streaming since it did not seem to be relevant to the question. The code is posted here: http://pastebin.com/RMtcjZb2. Can you try to run that in Windows Phone 8 and see if you still have an issue? – Brian Rogers Apr 7 '13 at 19:22
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I have found the culprit:

In one of my properties I was doing this:

public MyAction Action
{
    get 
    {
        if (_Action == null) {
            Action = new NoneAction();
        }
        return _Action; 
    }
    set
    {
        if (value != _Action)
        {
            _Action = value;
            NotifyPropertyChanged("Action");
        }
    }
}

The problem is in the getter, where I create a NoneAction if the obejct is null. Apparently Json.NET calls into the getter at some point between creating the MyClass object and setting the values of the MyAction object. When it sees that the Action-property is not null, it tries to assign the values instead of overwrite the whole object.

share|improve this answer
    
Makes sense. I am glad you were able to find the problem. – Brian Rogers Apr 7 '13 at 20:31

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