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I've created custom class, that shall behave like a matrix. I've got there some basic operations and everything seems to be working well... Nevertheless, I can't find out, what shall I write to destructor of this class to free all allocated memory. Would you please advice me?

class CMatrix {
public:

class Proxy {
    friend class CMatrix;

    const CMatrix* cmat;
    CMatrix *matrix;
    size_t n;

    Proxy(const CMatrix& m, size_t i)
    : cmat(&m), matrix(), n(i) {
    }

    Proxy(CMatrix& m, size_t i)
    : cmat(&m), matrix(&m), n(i) {
    }

    public:

    const double& operator[](size_t j) const {
       return cmat->_arrayofarrays[n * cmat->y + j];
    }

    double& operator[](size_t j) {
        if (matrix) {
            return matrix->_arrayofarrays[n * cmat->y + j];
        } else return cmat->_arrayofarrays[cmat->y];
    }
    };

    const Proxy operator[](size_t i) const {
        return Proxy(*this, i);
    }

    Proxy operator[](size_t i) {
        return Proxy(*this, i);
    }

    CMatrix() {
    _arrayofarrays = NULL;
    x = 0;
    y = 0;
};

// constructor

CMatrix(size_t x, size_t y) : _arrayofarrays(), x(x), y(y) {
    _arrayofarrays = new double[ x * y ]();
}

// destructor

~CMatrix() {
    // ?!?!???!?!?!?!!!!?!?!? 
    // #$#%@^$!!!!@$#%!!
}

// copy constructor

CMatrix(const CMatrix& other) : _arrayofarrays(), x(other.x), y(other.y) {
    delete [] _arrayofarrays;
    _arrayofarrays = new double[x * y];
    if (_arrayofarrays)
        std::copy(other._arrayofarrays, other._arrayofarrays + (x * y), _arrayofarrays);
}

CMatrix& operator =(const CMatrix& rval) {
    delete [] _arrayofarrays;
    _arrayofarrays = new double[ rval.x * rval.y];
    std::copy(rval._arrayofarrays, rval._arrayofarrays + (rval.x * rval.y), _arrayofarrays);
    x = rval.x;
    y = rval.y;
    return *this;
}



double *_arrayofarrays;
size_t x;
size_t y;
};

EDIT:

actually now I've realized, that it crashes after running this part of code. Before calling this code, I have there a instances of my class, let's call it a,b,c and then I want to set a = b-c; this works well for the first time...but when I want to repeat it, then it crashes

CMatrix CMatrix::operator-(const CMatrix &matrix) const {
if (this->x != matrix.x || this->y != matrix.y) {
    throw CSizeException(matrix.y, matrix.x, this->y, this->x, '+');
};
CMatrix m(this->x, this->y);
CMatrix l(matrix.x, matrix.y);
l._arrayofarrays = this->_arrayofarrays;
CMatrix o(matrix.y, matrix.y);
o = matrix;


CMatrix result(this->x, this->y);
for (unsigned int i = 0; i < this->x; i++)
    for (unsigned int j = 0; j < this->y; j++)
        m[i][j] = l[i][j] - o[i][j];           
return m;
}
share|improve this question
1  
You've already worked out how to delete the memory in other member functions, why can't you work out how to do it in the destructor? – Jonathan Wakely Apr 7 '13 at 19:22
    
I don't know, how to do it in this case, because calling delete[] _arrayofarrays causes segfault in this case... it is actually some sort of 2D array thanks to that Proxy class – Dworza Apr 7 '13 at 19:26
1  
use std::vector instead of raw arrays and new. let it handle the memory management for you. – Cheers and hth. - Alf Apr 7 '13 at 19:27
    
If you not sure you working with memory well, try to use some memory analysis tool like valgrind – loentar Apr 7 '13 at 19:27
    
Heh... wonder where this came from. – WhozCraig Apr 7 '13 at 19:27
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Something like this?

~CMatrix() {
    delete[] _arrayofarrays;
}

All arrays allocated with new[] must be destroyed by a matching call to delete[]. Moreover, you can remove the delete[] statement from the copy constructor:

CMatrix(const CMatrix& other) : _arrayofarrays(), x(other.x), y(other.y) {
    // delete [] _arrayofarrays;
    // ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    // This is unnecessary: you are creating a new object, so this data member
    // is not pointing to any previously allocated array

    // ...
}

UPDATE:

(from the comments) I can't use this code... _arrayofarrays is actually 2D array, so this causes that running of the program fails..probably segfault

This is incorrect: _arrayofarrays is a 1D array, and calling delete[] is the proper way do destroy it. If doing so leads to a segfault, probably you're doing something wrong in the rest of your code.

As an advice, it is usually a good idea to avoid manual memory management through raw pointers, new, and delete (or their array counterparts), because it is error-prone and easily leads to memory leaks or dereferencing of invalid pointers/reference.

Consider using standard containers such as std::vector<> or std::deque<> instead.


EDIT:

In the code of operator - you are doing:

l._arrayofarrays = this->_arrayofarrays;

This way you are having two matrix objects which encapsulate the same array: therefore, deleting one of the two will make the other one invalid as well. This is probably the root cause of your problem.

Also, you are creating way too many temporaries in there. Unless I'm missing something, this should be enough:

CMatrix CMatrix::operator-(const CMatrix &matrix) const {
    if (this->x != matrix.x || this->y != matrix.y) {
        throw CSizeException(matrix.y, matrix.x, this->y, this->x, '+');
    };

    CMatrix result(this->x, this->y);
    for (unsigned int i = 0; i < this->x; i++)
        for (unsigned int j = 0; j < this->y; j++)
            result[i][j] = (*this)[i][j] - matrix[i][j];

    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
What's the if for? – Jonathan Wakely Apr 7 '13 at 19:23
    
@JonathanWakely: The class has a default constructor that sets _arrayofarrays to NULL – Andy Prowl Apr 7 '13 at 19:23
    
I can't use this code... _arrayofarrays is actually 2D array, so this causes that running of the program fails..probably segfault – Dworza Apr 7 '13 at 19:24
1  
@AndyProwl I wouldn't expect you to check for NULL when deleting pointers. :) – jrok Apr 7 '13 at 19:24
1  
@Dworza: I updated the answer – Andy Prowl Apr 7 '13 at 19:46

The way to delete the memory in the destructor is the same as you wrote it in the other member functions:

    delete [] _arrayofarrays;

If this crashes then you must be corrupting memory somewhere else. Try using valgrind to check for memory errors.

There are some problems with your copy constructor:

CMatrix(const CMatrix& other) : _arrayofarrays(), x(other.x), y(other.y) {
    delete [] _arrayofarrays;

This is useless, there's nothing to delete yet.

    _arrayofarrays = new double[x * y];
    if (_arrayofarrays)

This if is useless, new will either throw an exception or return a non-null pointer, so checking if it's null is useless.

        std::copy(other._arrayofarrays, other._arrayofarrays + (x * y), _arrayofarrays);
}

There are some problems with your assignment operator too:

CMatrix& operator =(const CMatrix& rval) {
    delete [] _arrayofarrays;
    _arrayofarrays = new double[ rval.x * rval.y];

If the new allocation throws an exception then you leave _arrayofarrays holding a dangling pointer, you should either allocate the new memory before deleting the old memory or zero the old pointer after using delete[]

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