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I have this class:

class Object
{
    public:

    private:
        float _positionX, _positionY, _positionZ;
}

I need to do check and do some math every time a new value is assigned to them, and I also use these values in various places. I'm looking for an easier way to assign and check values than having these methods:

class Object
{
    public:
        float GetPositionX();
        void SetPositionX(float value);
        //etc
    private:
        float _positionX, _positionY, _positionZ;
}

So I'm trying to do something like this:

static class Vector3
{
    public:
        Vector3(float *valueX, float *valueY, float *valueZ)
        {
            _valueX = valueX;
            _valueY = valueY;
            _valueZ = valueZ;
        }
    private:
        float *_valueX, *_valueY, *_valueZ;
}
class Object
{
    public:
        Vector3 Position;
        //Position = Vector3(&_positionX, &_positionY, &_positionZ);
    private:
        float _positionX, _positionY, _positionZ;
}

Just so I can call it like this anywhere else in the code:

Object *myObj = new Object();
myObj->Position.x = 1; //assign, checks are done here
float myValue = myObj->Position.x; //receive, no checks needed

But the compiler complains that Vector3 doesn't have a default constructor. I also have a bunch of Object, and I'm not sure if I'm using the static Vector3 the right way (if it won't conflict with other object's values).

How can I get this working?

share|improve this question
2  
Your compiler doesn't complain about missing semicolons or trying to make a static class (with a constructor yet)? –  chris Apr 7 '13 at 19:50
    
According to here there are no static classes in C++. –  bash.d Apr 7 '13 at 19:52
    
@LuchianGrigore - According to this post (stackoverflow.com/questions/1635068/…) static class is not valid –  Ed Heal Apr 7 '13 at 19:53
    
I forgot to type the semicolons here, I'm sorry about that, but they're there in the code. –  Daniichi Apr 7 '13 at 19:53
    
@LuchianGrigore, I believe the compiler has to complain if there's no object, though. GCC certainly does. In any case, doing class C{} static c; might be clearer that it pertains to the object if you really want that all as part of that statement. –  chris Apr 7 '13 at 19:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Add a default constructor to Vector:

Vector3()
{
   _valueX = NULL;
   _valueY = NULL;
   _valueZ = NULL;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Or call the current one from the class that has the object. –  chris Apr 7 '13 at 19:56
    
Calling the non-default doesn't work because the code won't compile since I'm not calling a "Vector3 *myVector", but a "Vector3 myVector". Adding this default constructor worked perfectly (and I call the non-default in the parent class' constructor), thank you! –  Daniichi Apr 7 '13 at 20:14

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