Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

For one of my classes I recently came across both a ruby and a python implementations of using the miller-rabin algorithm to identify the number of primes between 20 and 29000. I am curious why, even though they are seemingly the same implementation, the python code runs so much faster. I have read that python was typically faster than ruby but is this much of a speed difference to be expected?

miller_rabin.rb

def miller_rabin(m,k)
  t = (m-1)/2;
  s = 1;  
  while(t%2==0)
    t/=2
    s+=1
  end

  for r in (0...k) 
   b = 0
   b = rand(m) while b==0
   prime = false
   y = (b**t) % m
   if(y ==1)
     prime = true
   end

   for i in (0...s)
      if y == (m-1)
        prime = true
        break
      else
        y = (y*y) % m
      end
   end

   if not prime
     return false
   end
  end
  return true
end

count = 0
for j in (20..29000)
   if(j%2==1 and miller_rabin(j,2))
     count+=1
   end
end
puts count

miller_rabin.py:

import math
  import random

  def miller_rabin(m, k):
      s=1
      t = (m-1)/2
      while t%2 == 0:
          t /= 2
          s += 1

      for r in range(0,k):
          rand_num = random.randint(1,m-1)
          y = pow(rand_num, t, m)
          prime = False

          if (y == 1):
              prime = True


          for i in range(0,s):
              if (y == m-1):
                  prime = True
                  break
              else:
                  y = (y*y)%m

          if not prime:
              return False

      return True

  count = 0
  for j in range(20,29001):
    if j%2==1 and miller_rabin(j,2):
        count+=1

  print count

When I measure the execution time of each using Measure-Command in Windows Powershell, I get the following:

Python 2.7:
Ticks: 4874403
Total Milliseconds: 487.4403

Ruby 1.9.3:
Ticks: 682232430
Total Milliseconds: 68223.243

I would appreciate any insight anyone can give me into why their is such a huge difference

share|improve this question
    
I'm just profiling the Ruby code to see if that reveals anything. –  Alex D Apr 7 '13 at 20:06
    
Note that you should change range to xrange in Python 2. range unnecessarily allocates a list of numbers. –  user4815162342 Apr 7 '13 at 20:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think these profile results should answer your question:

%self     total     self     wait    child    calls   name
96.81     43.05    43.05     0.00     0.00    17651   Fixnum#** 
1.98      0.88     0.88     0.00     0.00    17584   Bignum#% 
0.22     44.43     0.10     0.00    44.33    14490   Object#miller_rabin 
0.11      0.05     0.05     0.00     0.00    32142   <Class::Range>#allocate 
0.11      0.06     0.05     0.00     0.02    17658   Kernel#rand 
0.08     44.47     0.04     0.00    44.43    32142  *Range#each 
0.04      0.02     0.02     0.00     0.00    17658   Kernel#respond_to_missing? 
0.00     44.47     0.00     0.00    44.47        1   Kernel#load 
0.00     44.47     0.00     0.00    44.47        2   Global#[No method] 
0.00      0.00     0.00     0.00     0.00        2   IO#write 
0.00      0.00     0.00     0.00     0.00        1   Kernel#puts 
0.00      0.00     0.00     0.00     0.00        1   IO#puts 
0.00      0.00     0.00     0.00     0.00        2   IO#set_encoding 
0.00      0.00     0.00     0.00     0.00        1   Fixnum#to_s 
0.00      0.00     0.00     0.00     0.00        1   Module#method_added 

Looks like Ruby's ** operator is slow as compared to Python.

It looks like (b**t) is often too big to fix in a Fixnum, so you are using Bignum (or arbitrary-precision) arithmetic, which is much slower.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, I didn't realize this was going on under the hood. It definitely clears up some of my confusion –  user2255192 Apr 8 '13 at 19:54

In ruby you are using (a ** b) % c to calculate the modulo of exponentiation. In Python, you are using the much more efficient three-element pow call whose docstring explicitly states:

With three arguments, equivalent to (x**y) % z, but may be more efficient (e.g. for longs).

Whether you want to count the lack of such built-in operator against ruby is a matter of opinion. On the one hand, if ruby doesn't provide one, you might say that it's that much slower. On the other hand, you're not really testing the same thing algorithmically, so some would say that the comparison is not fair.

A quick googling reveals that there are implementations of modulo exponentiation for ruby.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks! This definitely helped clear up some of the confusion for me –  user2255192 Apr 8 '13 at 19:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.