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I have a couple of debug statements that I've wrapped with compiler references.

#if DEBUG
    Debug.WriteLine("Debug statement");
#endif

However when in the Debug configuration, DEBUG seems to equal false, and in Release DEBUG seems to equal true.

This is only happening in what looks like a single project, I am successfully getting debug statements from other projects.

Here is what I think the relevant part of the .csproj file is

<PropertyGroup Condition=" '$(Configuration)|$(Platform)' == 'Debug|x86' ">
    <PlatformTarget>x86</PlatformTarget>
    <DebugSymbols>true</DebugSymbols>
    <DebugType>full</DebugType>
    <Optimize>false</Optimize>
    <OutputPath>bin\Debug\</OutputPath>
    <DefineConstants>DEBUG;TRACE</DefineConstants>
    <ErrorReport>prompt</ErrorReport>
    <WarningLevel>4</WarningLevel>
  </PropertyGroup>
  <PropertyGroup Condition=" '$(Configuration)|$(Platform)' == 'Release|x86' ">
    <PlatformTarget>x86</PlatformTarget>
    <DebugType>pdbonly</DebugType>
    <Optimize>true</Optimize>
    <OutputPath>bin\Release\</OutputPath>
    <DefineConstants>TRACE</DefineConstants>
    <ErrorReport>prompt</ErrorReport>
    <WarningLevel>4</WarningLevel>
  </PropertyGroup>

Which to me looks perfectly fine, yet I still have this odd behaviour.

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3  
No, that looks good. You are definitely helping to much, Debug.WriteLine() already has a [Conditional] attribute that ensures it only works when DEBUG is defined. –  Hans Passant Apr 7 '13 at 21:04
    
This isn't C++, DEBUG is neither true nor false (it has no value), it's either defined or not defined. See msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/0feaad6z.aspx –  Peter Ritchie Apr 7 '13 at 21:08
    
@HansPassant Right so I don't need to double wrap it, however DEBUG certainly doesn't seem to be defined despite it being defined in by configuration? –  Technicolour Apr 7 '13 at 21:34
    
Right, so what are the odds that the code has an #undef or #define to screw you up? Clean it up, you'll encounter them. –  Hans Passant Apr 7 '13 at 21:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Right so the problem was that I was checking against the settings for the x86 platform (which had the DEBUG constants defined).

I was then building against the AnyCPU platform which didn't have them defined.

Completely my fault...

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