Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm making a text-editor in Java, and I have everything I need but auto-indent. How would I make the indentation stay the same if they go to a new line. I'm using a JTextPane for my editor window.

Basically, if a user enters a new line, I want the new line to be indented as was the previous.

Here is my code for the indentation so far:

Note: My JTextPane is txt, and the doc part is the JTextPane'sDefaultStyledDocument();

SimpleAttributeSet attributes = new SimpleAttributeSet();

TabStop[] tabStops = new TabStop[3];
tabStops[0] = new TabStop(25, TabStop.ALIGN_LEFT, TabStop.LEAD_DOTS);
tabStops[1] = new TabStop(25, TabStop.ALIGN_LEFT, TabStop.LEAD_DOTS);
tabStops[2] = new TabStop(25, TabStop.ALIGN_LEFT, TabStop.LEAD_DOTS);
tabStops[2] = new TabStop(25, TabStop.ALIGN_LEFT, TabStop.LEAD_DOTS);


TabSet tabSet = new TabSet(tabStops);
StyleConstants.setTabSet(attributes, tabSet);
doc.setParagraphAttributes(0, 0, attributes, false);
share|improve this question
    
Try to call doc.setParagraphAttributes(0, 1, attributes, false); to include the last paragraph Element –  StanislavL May 10 '13 at 7:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Use a Document Filter:

import java.awt.*;
import javax.swing.*;
import javax.swing.text.*;

public class NewLineFilter extends DocumentFilter
{
    public void insertString(FilterBypass fb, int offs, String str, AttributeSet a)
        throws BadLocationException
    {
        if ("\n".equals(str))
            str = addWhiteSpace(fb.getDocument(), offs);

        super.insertString(fb, offs, str, a);
    }

    public void replace(FilterBypass fb, int offs, int length, String str, AttributeSet a)
        throws BadLocationException
    {
        if ("\n".equals(str))
            str = addWhiteSpace(fb.getDocument(), offs);

        super.replace(fb, offs, length, str, a);
    }

    private String addWhiteSpace(Document doc, int offset)
        throws BadLocationException
    {
        StringBuilder whiteSpace = new StringBuilder("\n");
        Element rootElement = doc.getDefaultRootElement();
        int line = rootElement.getElementIndex( offset );
        int i = rootElement.getElement(line).getStartOffset();

        while (true)
        {
            String temp = doc.getText(i, 1);

            if (temp.equals(" ") || temp.equals("\t"))
            {
                whiteSpace.append(temp);
                i++;
            }
            else
                break;
        }

        return whiteSpace.toString();
    }

    private static void createAndShowUI()
    {
        JTextArea textArea = new JTextArea(5, 50);
        AbstractDocument doc = (AbstractDocument)textArea.getDocument();
        doc.setDocumentFilter( new NewLineFilter() );

        JFrame frame = new JFrame("NewLineFilter");
        frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        frame.add( new JScrollPane(textArea) );
        frame.pack();
        frame.setLocationByPlatform( true );
        frame.setVisible( true );
    }

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable()
        {
            public void run()
            {
                createAndShowUI();
            }
        });
    }
}

Read the section from the Swing tutorial on Implementing a Document Filter for more information.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm sorry, but I can't use that - my JTextPane already has a StyledDocument, and when I add the filter, the syntax highlighting stops working for some reason. If you can help in any way, please do. –  user2228462 Apr 8 '13 at 1:51
    
How does your Syntax Highlighting work? Does it also use a DocumentFilter. If so then you can use multiple DocumentFilters by using the approach suggested in Chaining Document Filters. Another option is to extend StyledDocument and override the insertString() method with the basic code I provided you. –  camickr Apr 8 '13 at 2:00
    
No, it works by AttributeSets, CharacterAttributes, comparing substrings - but ultimately uses a DefaultStyledDocument. –  user2228462 Apr 8 '13 at 2:06
    
Yes I know it uses AttributeSets etc.. But you somehow need to initiate the process of doing the highlighting whenever you add/remove text to the Document. Anyway my two suggestions from above are still valid. –  camickr Apr 8 '13 at 2:46
1  
That doesn't answer the question. Why do you set the Document manaually. Did you extend DefaultStyledDocument and override some methods to do the highlighting? If so what methods did you override. Extending the DefaultStyledDocument should not stop the DocumentFilter from working. –  camickr Apr 8 '13 at 6:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.