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I'm trying to reroll multiple dice and each time through remember the previous reroll as well. So, for example, if I roll 5 die and get 1,2,3,4,5. I ask which die do you want to reroll- 1, 3, 4 and then get something like 3,2,5,3,5. But as I ask in a loop, it overwrites the previous new rolls and only gives the last one. How do I store the new found numbers as I run through the loop?

reroll1 = input("Would you like to reroll? Yes or No: ")
if reroll1 == "Yes" or "yes":
count = 0
times = int(input("How many die would you like to reroll? "))
while count < times:
    whichreroll = input("Reroll die: ")
    if whichreroll == "1":
        reroll1 = random.randint(1,6)
    else:
        reroll1 = die1
    if whichreroll == "2":
        reroll2 = random.randint(1,6)
    else:
        reroll2 = die2
    if whichreroll == "3":
        reroll3 = random.randint(1,6)
    else:
        reroll3 = die3
    if whichreroll == "4":
        reroll4 = random.randint(1,6)
    else:
        reroll4 = die4
    if whichreroll == "5":
        reroll5 = random.randint(1,6)
    else:
        reroll5 = die5
    newset = [reroll1, reroll2, reroll3,reroll4,reroll5]

    count += 1
    print(newset)   
share|improve this question
1  
What language is this? Python? pseudocode? Please add a tag and/or write which language it is. – feralin Apr 7 '13 at 22:07
2  
FYI: if reroll1 == "Yes" or "yes": does not do what you think it does. You should try if reroll1.lower() == "yes": instead. – DaoWen Apr 7 '13 at 22:11
1  
Your question is not very clear. So if you input 4, you want the last reroll4 to hang around? Or if you input 4, you want reroll1, 2, 3, 5 to maintain their previous rolls? – CaTalyst.X Apr 7 '13 at 22:14
    
while i < count: is not as Pythonic as for i in range(count): – Joel Cornett Apr 7 '13 at 22:16
    
I think OP's issue is that the list of rolls is being completely overwritten at the bottom of the loop each iteration. Storing each roll by index should solve it. – ecline6 Apr 7 '13 at 22:37

You can clean things up quite a bit by just looping over a dice roll block instead of having all those if statements. This is done by using the chosen dice to index the existing list of dice rolls. I'm assuming that you already have a list with the original dice rolls so I just made one and copied to newset.

oldset = [1,2,3,4,5]
reroll1 = str(raw_input("Would you like to reroll? Yes or No: "))
if reroll1.lower() == "yes":
    count = 0
    times = int(input("How many die would you like to reroll? "))
    newset = oldset

    while count < times:
        whichreroll = input("Reroll die: ")
        reroll = random.randint(1,6)
        newset[whichreroll-1]= reroll
        count += 1
        print(newset)  
share|improve this answer

If I got your problem right,you can simply do that by having two set of lists, one is the one that you already have which is the newset, and the other one is the prevSet. prevSet is storing the last value of the results so basically you can initialize the prevSet in the beginning of each iteration so it would be

while (count < times):
    prevSet = newset 
    .
    .
    .
share|improve this answer
    
I essentially did the same thing you suggested except set my original list (which was dieset, not listed here), in place of newset, essentially (I think), restoring everything after each iteration. Before it would only change the last die number inputed bc of the way the loop was set up so it wasn't storing the previous new found numbers and then, on the last run through, only changing the newest one. In any case, it's working now:) Thanks for the responses! – Jen Apr 8 '13 at 4:45

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