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I am writing a method that swaps the elements of a two dimensional array. I have looked for answers to this, but there don't seem to be many good answers for this kind of swapping. The main difference from traditional swapping is that I am not trying to swap the integers within one of the length 2 array but instead trying to swap a pair of the length 2 arrays, more specifically their pointers. I am pretty new to C (trying to switch from Java). When I compile the code below, I receive a warning "assignment makes integer from pointer without a cast". Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

void swap(int array[][2], int indexA, int indexB)
{
    int *temp = array[indexA];
    *array[indexA] = array[indexB];
    *array[indexB] = temp;
}

Edit: I also tried the code below to replace the last two lines (not including the brackets, but that caused the compiler to give the error "incompatible types when assigning to type ‘int[2]’ from type ‘int *’" for each of those lines.

array[indexA] = array[indexB];
array[indexB] = temp;

Edit: The array declaration is below and the the swap function gets called as part of a quicksort implementation. The sort method that is calling the swap method uses the same type of argument declaration as the one I used in swap (i.e. "int array[][2]).

int counts[256][2];
share|improve this question
    
Are we correct that this is a real 2D contiguous array? The parameter to swap would suggest this to be the case, but I'm clarifying to be sure. In either case, value-swapping an array requires moving memory one way or another unless it is buried in a struct and a value-assignment does it for you. If possible, can you show a least one example of how your're invoking this from the caller? – WhozCraig Apr 7 '13 at 22:44
    
Not sure what you mean by "real" but I am not using any structs. – jmh Apr 7 '13 at 23:05
    
I mean you're not using a pointer-to-pointer base. I.e. int **base; for you 2D array, and you're clearly not now that you posted your call-side argument. (which is a good thing. yours is a real 2D contiguous array). – WhozCraig Apr 7 '13 at 23:08
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your code is attempting to value-assign two-element arrays, which is not allowed (for two element arrays, or any other length fr that matter) unless they're buried in a structure.

To move your data you have several options. Keeping your existing prototype you can do the following:

void swap(int array[][2], int indexA, int indexB)
{
    int temp[2];
    memcpy(temp, array[indexA], sizeof(temp));
    memcpy(array[indexA], array[indexB], sizeof(array[indexA]));
    memcpy(array[indexB], temp, array[indexB]);
}

Alternatively, you can use an element loop:

void swap(int array[][2], int indexA, int indexB)
{
    for (size_t i=0;sizeof(array[0])/sizeof(array[0][0]);++i)
    {
        int temp = array[indexA][i];
        array[indexA][i] = array[indexB][i];
        array[indexB][i] = temp;
    }
}

Finally, you may also consider using something like this:

void swap(int (*a)[2], int (*b)[2])
{
    int temp[sizeof(*a)/sizeof((*a)[0])];
    memcpy(temp,a,sizeof(temp));
    memcpy(a,b,sizeof(*a));
    memcpy(b,temp,sizeof(*b));
}

And invoking it on your caller side like this:

swap(counts[indexA], counts[indexB]);

which is more readable IMHO. Sample follows:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void swap(int (*a)[2], int (*b)[2])
{
    int temp[sizeof(*a)/sizeof((*a)[0])];
    memcpy(temp,a,sizeof(temp));
    memcpy(a,b,sizeof(*a));
    memcpy(b,temp,sizeof(*b));
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int counts[10][2];
    int indexA = 1, indexB = 2;
    counts[indexA][0] = counts[indexA][1] = 1;
    counts[indexB][0] = counts[indexB][1] = 2;
    swap(counts[indexA], counts[indexB]);

    // better be 2 2
    printf("%d %d\n", counts[indexA][0], counts[indexA][1]);
    return 0;
}

Output

2 2
share|improve this answer
    
Great! Thanks to both of you. Just as a quick question, for the last call to memcpy, wouldn't you want the third argument to be sizeof(array[indexB])? – jmh Apr 7 '13 at 23:27
    
I always use the target size, though they're supposed to be the same. If i'm going to go oob I'd rather do it on the read size than the write size, but in this case it shouldn't matter; everything is the same size. – WhozCraig Apr 8 '13 at 0:13

This should resolve the warnings, and if I understand right your situation, it will work.

int *temp = array[indexA];
array[indexA] = array[indexB];
array[indexB] = temp;

Remember that as you have a 2 dimension array, the value of "array[x]" still a pointer.

Edit:

Try this way.

int temp[2];
memcpy(temp, array[indexA], sizeof(temp));
memcpy(array[indexA], array[indexB], sizeof(temp));
memcpy(array[indexB], temp, sizeof(temp));
share|improve this answer
    
I probably should have written this in the original post, but I tried this as well and received the error "error: incompatible types when assigning to type ‘int[2]’ from type ‘int *’" for each of the last two lines. – jmh Apr 7 '13 at 22:39
1  
This isn't a pointer array. It is a real 2D array of contiguous values. – WhozCraig Apr 7 '13 at 22:42
    
Just updated my answer, if it is a real 2D array you will not be able to manipulate the pointers. Use memcpy instead. – Jonatan Goebel Apr 7 '13 at 23:15
    
+1, and the sample is not surprisingly identical to what I contrived as well. – WhozCraig Apr 7 '13 at 23:18

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