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Suppose I need to break out of three or four nested for loops at once at the occurence of some event inside the innermost loop. What is a neat way of doing that?

what I do is use flags like this:

int i, j, k;
int flag1 = 0;
int flag2 = 0;

for (i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
    for (j = 0; j < 100; j++) {
        for (k = 0; k < 100; k++) {
            if (k == 50) {
                flag1 = 1;
                flag2 = 1;
                break;
            }
        }
        if (flag1 == 1)break;
    }
    if (flag2 == 1)break;
}

I don't think this is particularly neat.

How would you accomplish the same thing? (w/o using jumps)

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8  
what language? . –  newacct Oct 19 '09 at 4:23
    
yes, what language –  Tom Neyland Oct 19 '09 at 4:25
    
i meant C whan I wrote the ques... does some language support this better? –  Moeb Oct 19 '09 at 4:27
2  
I like Environment.FailFast(string.Empty); . It will exit the loops in a nice and quick manner without any 'extra' stuff... :) –  KristoferA Oct 19 '09 at 4:33
    
In PHP break can accept the number of nested cycles you want to exit: php.net/manual/en/control-structures.break.php . The same principle applies to continue: php.net/manual/en/control-structures.continue.php . –  sergiol Mar 3 '13 at 10:02

13 Answers 13

up vote 77 down vote accepted

use goto. it's clean and simple.

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31  
So many people think that a bunch of flags is somehow better than goto just because of some rhetoric they have heard sometime –  gnibbler Oct 19 '09 at 4:29
3  
@Asaph, They are discussing excessive use of goto in an unstructured way. –  gnibbler Oct 19 '09 at 4:31
11  
@hanifr - What's unhealthy about simplicity, cleanliness, clarity and readability? Normally goto is none of those things, but every once in a while it becomes the ideal solution to your problem. And nearly every other language has special-case usages for builtin keywords like continue or next to hide what is essentially this kind of goto behind a nicer and more controllable visage, which is identical to what if and while and for statements do. goto here is not bad in any way –  Chris Lutz Oct 19 '09 at 4:36
5  
+1 this is the only place where i'd give java a point over c++ or c#. Java has a break <label> statement that breaks the loop named with a certain label. Neither C nor C# have anything similar, so the only clean way to do it is with goto. And @ asaph, think for yourself from time to time, it won't hurt! –  Blindy Oct 19 '09 at 5:01
8  
Yup, goto it is. I'm often surprised by lengths some people are willing to go to avoid writing that "cursed" keyword even when it clearly is the best - as in, most obvious, most readable, most maintainable - solution to the problem at hand. –  Pavel Minaev Oct 19 '09 at 5:06

Put all the loops in a function and just return instead of break.

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8  
Note that, while this neatly avoids an explicit goto it's essentially doing the same thing, so if you think this is a good solution you really can't make any argument against the goto solution. And note that goto may be preferable in the event of complex looping behavior that might make a function call less clear or simple. –  Chris Lutz Oct 19 '09 at 4:38
4  
The difference is that you can't abuse return in the way you can abuse goto. By the way, Java has a labeled break statement that allows you to break out of nested loops, but no goto. –  starblue Oct 19 '09 at 6:27
7  
In C++ return is better because it will respect stack-unwinding - and so destroy any locally scoped variables declared within any of the loops. –  philsquared Oct 19 '09 at 6:41
    
I would definately prefer the return approach to a goto, as in my experience it tends to create cleaner overall code. Not because that goto-s cannot be clean, but if you use a return, you have also isolated the function to one responsibility, executing the loop. If yousing gotos, then you are probably putting more separate concerns in the same function. Of course, this is not a universal truth, and may not be so in this case, but that would be my general position. –  Pete Oct 19 '09 at 7:00
4  
They may be essentially the same thing but code-wise, I think return is far cleaner. –  Jeremy Oct 19 '09 at 18:28

If you're using Java, you can associate labels with each for block and then reference the label after a continue statement. For example:

outerfor:
for (int i=0; i<5; i++) {
    innerfor:
    for (int j=0; j<5; j++) {
        if (i == 1 && j == 2) {
             continue outerfor;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Many languages (like Perl) allow this kind of label behavior, which is a good thing, and it should be used where applicable. So I would +1 if this applied to C. (I know OP is interested in other languages, but he's probably more interested in C.) –  Chris Lutz Oct 19 '09 at 4:40
1  
@Chris Lutz: fair enough. FWIW: When the OP originally posted, there was no mention of what language he/she was using. Hence all the comments asking what language. The c tag was added after I posted. –  Asaph Oct 19 '09 at 4:53
    
This same trick works in JavaScript too :) –  ephemient Oct 19 '09 at 15:52

How would you accomplish the same thing? (w/o using jumps)

Why? Nothing is universally evil, and every put-upon tool has its uses (except gets()). Using goto here makes your code look cleaner, and is one of the only choices we have (assuming C). Look:

int i, j, k;

for (i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
    for (j = 0; j < 100; j++) {
        for (k = 0; k < 100; k++) {
            if (k == 50) {
                goto END;
            }
        }
    }
}
END:

Much cleaner than all those flag variables, and it even shows more clearly what your code is doing.

share|improve this answer
1  
And how would you refactor this? You not REALLY want 3 nested loops in your code? –  Bostone Oct 19 '09 at 4:43
3  
I don't know how to refactor this, because the OP isn't being very specific on what his three nested loops are doing in his code. He just wants to break out of all of them from inside one of them, so I provide the answer. Some operations require O(n^3) time to accomplish, but end up being fast enough in practice because they'll usually operate on small data sets and/or the operation performed is simple and easily optimized. Don't try to refactor that which is clear and clean and works just fine. –  Chris Lutz Oct 19 '09 at 4:46

Just a wee bit better.

int i, j, k;
int flag1 = 0;
int flag2 = 0;

for (i = 0; i < 100 && !flag2; i++) {
    for (j = 0; j < 100 && !flag1; j++) {
        for (k = 0; k < 100; k++) {
            if (k == 50) {
                flag1 = 1;
                flag2 = 1;
                break;
            }
        }
    }
}

But if you really need to have those loops, then it makes sense explicitly declaring in each loop what conditions must hold for it to continue, for readability.

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1  
In my opinion, this isn't really better. The sheer volume of stuff being put into the for statement starts to look like line noise. –  Chris Lutz Oct 19 '09 at 5:00
1  
What's the point of having multiple flags? Just have one. Call it done. Much clearer. –  Alan Oct 19 '09 at 6:29
    
just copied the sample. i'm assuming the flags are not that simple and just a representative of the actual code. –  moogs Oct 20 '09 at 1:38
    
then again, if it's as simple as what he said (breaking out immediately). you're right –  moogs Oct 20 '09 at 1:39

goto. This is one of the very few places where goto is the appropriate tool, and is usually the argument presented why goto isn't complete evil.

Sometimes, though, I do this:

void foo() {
    bar_t *b = make_bar();
    foo_helper(bar);
    free_bar(b);
}

void foo_helper(bar_t *b) {
    int i,j;
    for (i=0; i < imax; i++) {
        for (j=0; j < jmax; j++) {
            if (uhoh(i, j) {
                return;
            }
        }
    }
}

The idea is that I get a guaranteed free of bar, plus I get a clean two-level break out of the switch via return.

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If you absolutely don't want to use goto, set all loop conditions to false:

int i, j, k;

for (i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
    for (j = 0; j < 100; j++) {
        for (k = 0; k < 100; k++) {
            if (k == 50) {
                i = j = k = INT_MAX;
                break;
            }
        }
    }
}

note: a smart optimizing compiler will turn the contents of the if in a jump to the end of the outer-most loop

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sometimes you can use trick like this:

for (i = 0; i < 100 && !flag2; i++) {
for (j = 0; j < 100 && !flag1; j++) {
    for (k = 0; k < 100; k++) {
        if (k == 50) {
            k = 100;
            i = 100;
            j = 100;
        }
    }
}

}

or declare addition flag in your loop:

bool end = false;
for(int i =0; i < 1000 && !end; i++) {
   //do thing
   end = true;
}

it costs only a line but clean, I think.

justin

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a little bit of silly self-documenting:

int i, j, k;
int done = 0;

for (i = 0; i < 100 && ! done; i++) {
    for (j = 0; j < 100 && ! done; j++) {
        for (k = 0; k < 100 && ! done; k++) {
            if (k == 50) we_are(done);
        }
    }
}

//...

void we_are(int *done) {
    *done = 1;
}

but really, you shouldn't have three nested for-loops. You should consider refactoring into different functions and improving your program's logic instead of doing this.

While I agree that sometimes goto really is the best solution, I think that any problem to which goto is the solution is a result of poor code.

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1  
+1 for the great code. nice. –  elcuco Oct 19 '09 at 19:53

One way to do it is a state machine. But i would still use goto. It's much simpler. :)

state = 0;
while( state >= 0){
    switch(state){
        case 0: i = 0; state = 1; // for i = 0
        case 1:
            i++; 
            if (i < 100)   // if for i < 100 not finished
                state = 2; // do the inner j loop
            else
                state = -1; // finish loop
        case 2: j = 0; state = 3; // for j = 0
        case 3: 
            j++;
            if (j < 100)  // if j < 100 not finished
                state = 4 // do the inner k loop
            else
                state = 1; // go backt to loop i
            break;
        case 4: k = 0; state = 5;
        case 5:
            k++;
            if (k == 50){
                state = -1;
                break;
            }
            if (k < 100) // if k loop not finished
                state = 5; // do this loop
            else
                state = 3; // go back to upper loop
            break;
        default : state = -1;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
What is the advantage of a state-machine over a goto? –  Alphaneo Oct 19 '09 at 6:13
    
Actually non. It's just another way doing these loops and breaking out without goto. I would do this with goto. In some cases it's better to use this. For example if you have a lot jumping from one loop to the other like regExp. RegExp parsers compile these machines because they run fast and they can be optimized. –  egon Oct 19 '09 at 13:31

Dividing by 0 is the surest method I know that will break you out of any number of loops. This works because the DIV assembly instruction doesn't like such silliness.

So, you can try this:

int i, j, k;
int flag1 = 0;
int flag2 = 0;

for (i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
    for (j = 0; j < 100; j++) {
        for (k = 0; k < 100; k++) {
            if (k == 50) {
                flag1 = 1;
                flag2 = 1;
                int z = 1 / 0;  // we're outta here!!!
            }
        }
        if (flag1 == 1)break;
    }
    if (flag2 == 1)break;
}

Getting back from the trap that happens on such events left as an exercise for the reader (it's trivial).

share|improve this answer
    
A good enough compiler should not compile this (as it is an invalid constant expression), beside this exceptions shall never be used as a replacement for control logic. Advising people to do so seems DIVilish to me :-) –  jdehaan Oct 19 '09 at 6:46
1  
hahaha, golden. –  Carson Myers Oct 19 '09 at 18:17
    
I'm voting this up because its so funny. –  Justicle Feb 16 '10 at 0:11

If premature completion of any cycle always means that you have to break the enclosing cycle as well, then you don't need any extra flags. The whole thing might just look as follows

int i, j, k;
for (i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
    for (j = 0; j < 100; j++) {
        for (k = 0; k < 100; k++) {
            if (k == 50)
                break;
        }
        if (k < 100) break;
    }
    if (j < 100) break;
}

In my experience, this is what is needed in majority of cases.

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I'd do something like:

  int i, j, k;

  for (i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
      for (j = 0; j < 100; j++) {
          for (k = 0; k < 100; k++) {
              if (k == 50) {
                  return;
              }
          }
      }
  }
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