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I am working on WPF application.
I use StructureMap to inject dependencies.
There are some service layer classes exist that they give parameter from constructor.
The value that I pass to constructor will change run time.
Presentation layer's classes use services to present data for user. Whenever value has changed I inject service again with new value. But active instance of presentation layer returns previous value.
I've prepared simple example for better understanding.

// static class that keeps some value
public class ValueKeeper

{
    public static string Value { get; set; }
}

public interface IService
{
    string Value { get; set; }
}
// Service layer class
public class Service : IService
{
    // default constructor
    public Service(string value)
    {
        Value = value;
    }

    #region IService Members

    public string Value { get; set; }

    #endregion
}


public class Program
{
    private readonly IService _service;
    //injecting service class
    public Program(IService service)
    {
        _service = service;
    }
    // structuremap configuration
    private static void Config()
    {
        ObjectFactory.Initialize(x => x.Scan(scanner =>
                                                 {
                                                     scanner.TheCallingAssembly();

                                                     scanner.WithDefaultConventions();
                                                     x.For<IService>().CacheBy(InstanceScope.Hybrid).Use(() =>
                                                                                                             {
                                                                                                                 var service = new Service("value1");
                                                                                                                 return service;
                                                                                                             });
                                                 }));
    }
    // structuremap configuration after value changed.
    private static void ReConfig()
    {
        ObjectFactory.Configure(x => x.Scan(scanner =>
                                                 {
                                                     x.For<IService>().CacheBy(InstanceScope.Hybrid).Use(() =>
                                                                                                             {
                                                                                                                 var service =new Service(ValueKeeper.Value);
                                                                                                                 return service;
                                                                                                             });
                                                 }));
    }


    private string PresentationMethod()
    {
        return _service.Value;
    }

    private static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Config();  // Firtst time injecting dependencies
        var prog = ObjectFactory.GetInstance<Program>(); 
        Console.WriteLine(prog.PresentationMethod()); // returns "value1"
        ValueKeeper.Value = "value 2"; //changing static property
        ReConfig(); // reconfig  service class with new property
         Console.WriteLine(prog.PresentationMethod()); // it returns value1 but I expect value2 .
        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

Real application contains many presentation and service classes.
How can I change live service instances with new object and value ?


Update : I saw this link. It seems by using Setter Injection It's possible to change existing object.
Is setter injection my solution ?

share|improve this question
    
Can you not make this injected value also a property of the interface so that you don't have to keep injecting new instances of a class each time? It seems like a horrible practice to re-inject a dependency if only the constructor parameter is changing each time. –  Simon Whitehead Apr 8 '13 at 0:56
    
@SimonWhitehead I can't . Because service class that I exampled is actually a class in .NET library. (DbContext). I have to pass connection string to its constructor. –  shaahin Apr 8 '13 at 1:07
1  
@shaahin No IoC keep track of the instances it creates (unless its singleton) AFAIK. So, short answer would be that there is no way to do this with the container. What you can do is wrap the GetInstance() method in a method you control and keep track of instances created yourself so you can change their dependencies whenever you need. However, I would advise you not to do that since keep tracking of instances throughout the application is no easy task. You should reconsider your reasons and rethink the solution. –  tucaz Apr 8 '13 at 13:52
    
@tucaz Thanks. How about using 'Setter Injection' ? It seems I need a solution to change dependency of an initialized object . –  shaahin Apr 8 '13 at 14:23
1  
Setter injection is just another way to pass a dependency to an object. You are using Constructor injection where dependencies go via constructor. In the Setter injection they are injected by calling the set method in a property. That's not what you need. It does not matter what is the injection method, the IoC container wont keep track and change existing instances for you. –  tucaz Apr 8 '13 at 14:31

1 Answer 1

You could use the strategy pattern to easily keep track of and switch between instances of the same interface at runtime. Here is a quick example:

var container = new Container(x => x.Scan(scan =>
{
    scan.TheCallingAssembly();
    scan.WithDefaultConventions();
    scan.AddAllTypesOf<IDiscountCalculator>();
}));
var strategy = container.GetInstance<IDiscountStrategy>();
Console.WriteLine(strategy.GetDiscount("Regular", 10)); // 0
Console.WriteLine(strategy.GetDiscount("Normal", 10)); // 1
Console.WriteLine(strategy.GetDiscount("Special", 10)); // 5

which depends on the following types:

public interface IDiscountStrategy 
{
    decimal GetDiscount(string userType, decimal orderTotal);
}

public class DiscountStrategy : IDiscountStrategy
{
    private readonly IDiscountCalculator[] _discountCalculators;

    public DiscountStrategy(IDiscountCalculator[] discountCalculators)
    {
        _discountCalculators = discountCalculators;
    }

    public decimal GetDiscount(string userType, decimal orderTotal)
    {
        var calculator = _discountCalculators.FirstOrDefault(x => x.AppliesTo(userType));
        if (calculator == null) return 0;
        return calculator.CalculateDiscount(orderTotal);
    }
}

public interface IDiscountCalculator
{
    bool AppliesTo(string userType);
    decimal CalculateDiscount(decimal orderTotal);
}

public class NormalUserDiscountCalculator : IDiscountCalculator
{
    public bool AppliesTo(string userType)
    {
        return userType == "Normal";
    }

    public decimal CalculateDiscount(decimal orderTotal)
    {
        return orderTotal * 0.1m;
    }
}

public class SpecialUserDiscountCalculator : IDiscountCalculator
{
    public bool AppliesTo(string userType)
    {
        return userType == "Special";
    }

    public decimal CalculateDiscount(decimal orderTotal)
    {
        return orderTotal * 0.5m;
    }
}

Or, if you have short lived dependencies that you want to dispose of right away, you should inject an abstract factory to create them on demand.

public ISomeObjectFactory
{
    ISomeObject Create();
    void Release(ISomeObject someObject);
}

public class SomeObjectFactory
    : ISomeObjectFactory
{
    //private readonly IAclModule aclModule;

    // Inject dependencies at application startup here
    //public SiteMapPluginProviderFactory(
    //    IAclModule aclModule
    //    )
    //{
    //    if (aclModule == null)
    //        throw new ArgumentNullException("aclModule");
    //
    //    this.aclModule = aclModule;
    //}

    public ISomeObject Create(IState state)
    {
        return new SomeObject(state);
        // return new SomeObject(state, this.aclModule);
    }

    pubic void Release(ISomeObject someObject)
    {
        var disposable = someObject as IDisposable;
        if (disposable != null)
        {
            disposable.Dispose();
        }
    }
}

And then use like:

public class Consumer : IConsumer
{
    private readonly ISomeObjectFactory someObjectFactory;

    public Consumer(ISomeObjectFactory someObjectFactory)
    {
        if (someObjectFactory == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("someObjectFactory");
        this.someObjectFactory = someObjectFactory; 
    }

    public void DoSomething(IState state)
    {
        var instance = this.someObjectFactory.Create(state);
        try
        {
            // Use the instance here.
        }
        finally
        {
            this.someObjectFactory.Release(instance);
        }
    }
}

Although not shown here, the factory could switch between different classes if needed, or you could pass a different dependency (the IState in this example) to the same type of class when it is created.

Service Locator is Anti-Pattern and should be avoided in all but the rarest of circumstances.

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