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I am new to c, and I am hitting the web hard, soaking up resources to help learn.

I am starting off with a simple command prompt type deal, and even this is giving me difficulties! I am trying my best to learn pointers, but the idea is hard to grasp for me, so here is the code that is giving me trouble. I hope that the answers to this troublesome code will help enlighten me on the syntax of pointers.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include "login.h"
#include "help.h"
#include <malloc.h>

main()
{
if(login())                /* Login runs fine. After the imported */ 
{                          /*login code runs, it takes me to the main screen */
    int prac;          /* (printf("Type help for a list of commands")) i input*/
    char inpt[255];    /* help, the imported help screen runs,then the core 
    int *ptr;          /*dumps. oh and i know the malloc() syntax is wront*/
    malloc(255) == ptr;   /*that's just the last thing i tried before i posted*/

    *ptr == printf("Continuing Program...\n\n");
    printf("---Type Help For a List of Commands----\n");
    gets(inpt);
    if (strcmp(inpt, help) == 1)
    {
        help();
        goto *ptr;
    }
}
return 0;
}
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closed as too localized by Rapptz, Anthon, Andy Lester, jogojapan, Graviton Apr 8 '13 at 8:37

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8  
This shouldn't compile, let alone segfault. A book is your best friend. –  chris Apr 8 '13 at 2:32
    
If you want to know why some code has a problem, then show that exact code -- not something else you attempted afterward. –  Luc Danton Apr 8 '13 at 2:38
1  
It would help if you explained what you expected this code to do. Some of the lines of code are utterly baffling, like malloc(255) == ptr; and *ptr == printf("Continuing Program...\n\n");. It's hard to imagine what you expected these to do. –  David Schwartz Apr 8 '13 at 2:40
    
@LucDanton this is the exact code O.O –  Mitchell Gray Edwards Apr 8 '13 at 2:40
    
I'd suggest a copy of Kernighan and Ritchie. It has taught a lot of people to program in C. –  Fred Apr 8 '13 at 2:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

just revised to do what I think you want, I'm assuming you want to get help, then loop around and get another command from the user.

int prac;          
char inpt[255];    
bool quit = false;
while(!quit)
{
printf("Continuing Program...\n\n");
printf("---Type Help For a List of Commands----\n");
gets(inpt);
if (strcmp(inpt, "help") == 0)
{
    help();     
}
if (strcmp(inpt, "quit") == 0)
{
    quit = true;
}

}

pointers aren't used with goto, while similar in concept to labels, in reality they are quite different in terms of how the language works.

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thats exactly what i needed actually! thank you, very much. this was very helpful! –  Mitchell Gray Edwards Apr 8 '13 at 2:48

You may want to review basic C.

This is a comparison, not an assignment. The statement leaks memory but has no other effect.

malloc(255) == ptr;

This dereferences an uninitialized variable, and compares it with the result code of printf(). Most people just ignore the result of printf(). However, since ptr is uninitialized, this will at best crash your program with a segmentation fault, and might do something worse.

*ptr == printf("Continuing Program...\n\n");

This compares a string against a function. This will probably not crash on most systems, but it's wrong either way.

strcmp(inpt, help)

This is nonsense, and shouldn't compile. You can only goto a label, and *ptr is not a label.

goto *ptr;
share|improve this answer
    
thank you! the malloc statement was a last ditch effort, throwing it at the wall and hoping something would stick. thank you for being nice to the noob :P –  Mitchell Gray Edwards Apr 8 '13 at 2:49
1  
@MitchellGrayEdwards: If you "throw things against the wall and hope they stick", you will always have problems with segmentation faults, and worse. –  Dietrich Epp Apr 8 '13 at 2:55

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