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I'm using the Excel interop in C# (ApplicationClass) and have placed the following code in my finally clause:

while (System.Runtime.InteropServices.Marshal.ReleaseComObject(excelSheet) != 0) { }
excelSheet = null;
GC.Collect();
GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();

Although, this kind of works the Excel.exe process is still in the background even after I close Excel. It is only released once my application is manually closed.

Anyone realize what I am doing wrong, or has an alternative to ensure interop objects are properly disposed of.

share|improve this question
1  
Are you trying to shut down the Excel.exe without closing your application? Not sure I fully understand your question. –  Bryant Oct 1 '08 at 17:23
3  
I'm trying to make sure the unmanaged interop objects are disposed of properly. So that there are not Excel processes hanging around even when the user has finished with Excel spreadsheet we created from the app. –  HAdes Oct 1 '08 at 17:29
2  
If you can try to do it by producing XML Excel files, otherwise please consider VSTO un/managed Memory Management: jake.ginnivan.net/vsto-com-interop –  Jeremy Thompson Apr 25 '12 at 6:35
    
Does this translate to Excel nicely? –  CodeBlend Nov 26 '12 at 14:10
    
Answer is below. But I have two tips anyway for the code above: 1) You should use Marshal.FinalReleaseComObject(excelSheet) instead of using this while loop 2) The row "excelSheet = null;" isn't needed when "excelSheet" is a local variable –  jreichert Sep 26 at 9:32

30 Answers 30

up vote 403 down vote accepted

Excel does not quit because your app is still holding references to COM objects.

I guess you're invoking at least one member of a COM object without assigning it to a variable.

For me it was the excelApp.Worksheets object which I directly used without assigning it to a variable:

Worksheet sheet = excelApp.Worksheets.Open(...);
...
Marshal.ReleaseComObject(sheet);

What I didn't know was that internally C# created a wrapper for the Worksheets COM object which didn't get released by my code (because I wasn't aware of it) and was the cause why Excel was not unloaded.

I found the solution to my problem on this page, which also has a nice rule for the usage of COM objects in C#:

Never use 2 dots with com objects.


So with this knowledge the right way of doing the above is:

Worksheets sheets = excelApp.Worksheets; // <-- the important part
Worksheet sheet = sheets.Open(...);
...
Marshal.ReleaseComObject(sheets);
Marshal.ReleaseComObject(sheet);
share|improve this answer
4  
Yeah, saved my life (at least an evening ;) –  VVS Oct 1 '08 at 18:09
9  
Then I suggest not using Excel from COM and save yourself all of the trouble. The Excel 2007 formats can be used without ever opening Excel, gorgeous. –  user7116 Dec 18 '09 at 17:35
13  
This means, you shouldn't use the pattern comObject.Property.PropertiesProperty (you see the two dots?). Instead assign comObject.Property to a variable and use and dispose that variable. A more formal version of the above rule could be sth. like "Assign com object to variables before you use them. This includes com objects that are properties of another com object." –  VVS Feb 4 '10 at 10:37
3  
@Nick: Actually, you don't need any kind of cleanup, since the garbage collector will do it for you. The only thing you need to do is to assign every COM object to its own variable so the GC knows of it. –  VVS Oct 18 '10 at 7:42
6  
@VSS thats bollocks, the GC cleans up everything since the wrapper variables are made by the .net framework. It just might take forever for the GC to clean it up. Calling GC.Collect after heavy interop isn't a bad idear. –  CodingBarfield Aug 11 '11 at 8:28

You can actually release your Excel Application object cleanly, but you do have to take care.

The advice to maintain a named reference for absolutely every COM object you access and then explicitly release it via Marshal.FinalReleaseComObject() is correct in theory, but, unfortunately, very difficult to manage in practice. If one ever slips anywhere and uses "two dots", or iterates cells via a for each loop, or any other similar kind of command, then you'll have unreferenced COM objects and risk a hang. In this case, there would be no way to find the cause in the code; you would have to review all your code by eye and hopefully find the cause, a task that could be nearly impossible for a large project.

The good news is that you do not actually have to maintain a named variable reference to every COM object you use. Instead, call GC.Collect() and then GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers() to release all the (usually minor) objects to which you do not hold a reference, and then explicitly release the objects to which you do hold a named variable reference.

You should also release your named references in reverse order of importance: range objects first, then worksheets, workbooks, and then finally your Excel Application object.

For example, assuming that you had a Range object variable named "xlRng", a Worksheet variable named "xlSheet", a Workbook variable named "xlBook" and an Excel Application variable named "xlApp", then your cleanup code could look something like the following:

// Cleanup
GC.Collect();
GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();

Marshal.FinalReleaseComObject(xlRng);
Marshal.FinalReleaseComObject(xlSheet);

xlBook.Close(Type.Missing, Type.Missing, Type.Missing);
Marshal.FinalReleaseComObject(xlBook);

xlApp.Quit();
Marshal.FinalReleaseComObject(xlApp);

In most code examples you'll see for cleaning up COM objects from .NET, the GC.Collect() and GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers() calls are made TWICE as in:

GC.Collect();
GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();
GC.Collect();
GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();

This should not be required, however, unless you are using Visual Studio Tools for Office (VSTO), which uses finalizers that cause an entire graph of objects to be promoted in the finalization queue. Such objects would not be released until the next garbage collection. However, if you are not using VSTO, you should be able to call GC.Collect() and GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers() just once.

I know that explicitly calling GC.Collect() is a no-no (and certainly doing it twice sounds very painful), but there is no way around it, to be honest. Through normal operations you will generate hidden objects to which you hold no reference that you, therefore, cannot release through any other means other than calling GC.Collect().

This is a complex topic, but this really is all there is to it. Once you establish this template for your cleanup procedure you can code normally, without the need for wrappers, etc. :-)

I have a tutorial on this here:

Automating Office Programs with VB.Net / COM Interop

It's written for VB.NET, but don't be put off by that, the principles are exactly the same as when using C#.

share|improve this answer
2  
A related discussion can be found on the ExtremeVBTalk .NET Office Automation forum, here: xtremevbtalk.com/showthread.php?t=303928. –  Mike Rosenblum Jan 24 '09 at 15:15
2  
And if all else fails, then Process.Kill() can be used (as a last resort) as described here: stackoverflow.com/questions/51462/… –  Mike Rosenblum Feb 7 '09 at 18:56
    
+1. I've recently picked up someone else's code that uses Excel and I noticed how many Excel instances there were. This code fixes the issue in a simple way! Thanks. –  RichardOD Dec 13 '10 at 11:24
1  
Glad it worked Richard. :-) And here is a subtle example where simply avoiding "two dots" is not sufficient to prevent a problem: stackoverflow.com/questions/4964663/… –  Mike Rosenblum Feb 13 '11 at 17:22
2  
Only this worked for me.. –  nawfal Oct 11 '11 at 10:58

Preface: my answer contains two solutions, so be careful when reading and don't miss anything.

There are different ways and advices of how to make Excel instance unload, such as:

  • Releasing EVERY com object explicitly with Marshal.FinalReleaseComObject() (not forgetting about implicitly created com-objects). To release every created com object, you may use the rule of 2 dots mentioned here:
    How to properly clean up Excel interop objects in C#

  • Calling GC.Collect() and GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers() to make CLR release unused com-objects * (Actually, it works, see my second solution for details)

  • Checking if com-server-application maybe shows a message box waiting for the user to answer (though I am not sure it can prevent Excel from closing, but I heard about it a few times)

  • Sending WM_CLOSE message to the main Excel window

  • Executing the function that works with Excel in a separate AppDomain. Some people believe Excel instance will be shut, when AppDomain is unloaded.

  • Killing all excel instances which were instantiated after our excel-interoping code started.

BUT! Sometimes all these options just don't help or can't be appropriate!

For example, yesterday I found out that in one of my functions (which works with excel) Excel keeps running after the function ends. I tried everything! I thoroughly checked the whole function 10 times and added Marshal.FinalReleaseComObject() for everything! I also had GC.Collect() and GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers(). I checked for hidden message boxes. I tried to send WM_CLOSE message to the main Excel window. I executed my function in a separate AppDomain and unloaded that domain. Nothing helped! The option with closing all excel instances is inappropriate, because if the user starts another Excel instance manually, during execution of my function which works also with Excel, then that instance will also be closed by my function. I bet the user will not be happy! So, honestly, this is a lame option (no offense guys). So I spent a couple of hours before I found a good (in my humble opinion) solution: Kill excel process by hWnd of its main window (it's a first solution).

Here is the simple code:

[DllImport("user32.dll")]
private static extern uint GetWindowThreadProcessId(IntPtr hWnd, out uint lpdwProcessId);

/// <summary> Tries to find and kill process by hWnd to the main window of the process.</summary>
/// <param name="hWnd">Handle to the main window of the process.</param>
/// <returns>True if process was found and killed. False if process was not found by hWnd or if it could not be killed.</returns>
public static bool TryKillProcessByMainWindowHwnd(int hWnd)
{
    uint processID;
    GetWindowThreadProcessId((IntPtr)hWnd, out processID);
    if(processID == 0) return false;
    try
    {
        Process.GetProcessById((int)processID).Kill();
    }
    catch (ArgumentException)
    {
        return false;
    }
    catch (Win32Exception)
    {
        return false;
    }
    catch (NotSupportedException)
    {
        return false;
    }
    catch (InvalidOperationException)
    {
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}

/// <summary> Finds and kills process by hWnd to the main window of the process.</summary>
/// <param name="hWnd">Handle to the main window of the process.</param>
/// <exception cref="ArgumentException">
/// Thrown when process is not found by the hWnd parameter (the process is not running). 
/// The identifier of the process might be expired.
/// </exception>
/// <exception cref="Win32Exception">See Process.Kill() exceptions documentation.</exception>
/// <exception cref="NotSupportedException">See Process.Kill() exceptions documentation.</exception>
/// <exception cref="InvalidOperationException">See Process.Kill() exceptions documentation.</exception>
public static void KillProcessByMainWindowHwnd(int hWnd)
{
    uint processID;
    GetWindowThreadProcessId((IntPtr)hWnd, out processID);
    if (processID == 0)
        throw new ArgumentException("Process has not been found by the given main window handle.", "hWnd");
    Process.GetProcessById((int)processID).Kill();
}

As you can see I provided two methods, according to Try-Parse pattern (I think it is appropriate here): one method doesn't throw exception if the Process could not be killed (for example the process doesn't exist anymore), and another method throws exception if the Process was not killed. The only weak place in this code is security permissions. Theoretically, user may not have permissions to kill the process, but in 99.99% of all cases user has such permissions. I also tested it with a guest account - it works perfectly.

So, your code, working with Excel, can look like this:

int hWnd = xl.Application.Hwnd;
// ...
// here we try to close Excel as usual, with xl.Quit(),
// Marshal.FinalReleaseComObject(xl) and so on
// ...
TryKillProcessByMainWindowHwnd(hWnd);

Voila! Excel is terminated! :)

Ok, let's go back to the second solution, as I promised in the beginning of the post. The second solution is to call GC.Collect() and GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers(). Yes, they actually work, but you need to be careful here!
Many people say (and I said) that calling GC.Collect() doesn't help. But the reason it wouldn't help is if there are still references to COM objects! One of the most popular reasons for GC.Collect() not being helpful is running the project in Debug-mode. In debug-mode objects that are not really referenced anymore will not be garbage collected until the end of the method.
So, if you tried GC.Collect() and GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers() and it didn't help, try to do the following:

1) Try to run your project in Release mode and check if Excel closed correctly

2) Wrap the method working with Excel in a separate method. So, instead of something like this:

void GenerateWorkbook(...)
{
  ApplicationClass xl;
  Workbook xlWB;
  try
  {
    xl = ...
    xlWB = xl.Workbooks.Add(...);
    ...
  }
  finally
  {
    ...
    Marshal.ReleaseComObject(xlWB)
    ...
    GC.Collect();
    GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();
  }
}

you write:

void GenerateWorkbook(...)
{
  try
  {
    GenerateWorkbookInternal(...);
  }
  finally
  {
    GC.Collect();
    GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();
  }
}

private void GenerateWorkbookInternal(...)
{
  ApplicationClass xl;
  Workbook xlWB;
  try
  {
    xl = ...
    xlWB = xl.Workbooks.Add(...);
    ...
  }
  finally
  {
    ...
    Marshal.ReleaseComObject(xlWB)
    ...
  }
}

Now, Excel will close =)

share|improve this answer
14  
sad that the thread is already so old that your excellent answer appears that far below, which I think is the only reason for it not being upvoted more times... –  chiccodoro May 4 '10 at 16:32
3  
Boo Yah! It's gone! I'm watching the task manager to see if Excel drops off the planet and it did. Thanks many! –  Chris Hayes May 11 '10 at 20:15
3  
So instead of cleaning your mess up, you just burn the house? Yeah, bad analogy.. –  VVS Aug 24 '10 at 8:13
9  
I have to admit, when I first read your answer, I thought it was a giant kludge. After about 6 hours of wrestling with this (everything is released, I've got no double dots, etc..), I now think your answer is genius. –  Mark Aug 27 '10 at 15:53
2  
Thanks for this. Been wrestling with an Excel that wouldn't close no matter what for a couple of days before I found this. Excellent. –  BBlake Oct 19 '10 at 15:27

UPDATE: Added C# code, and link to Windows Jobs

I spent sometime trying to figure out this problem, and at the time XtremeVBTalk was the most active and responsive. Here is a link to my original post, Closing an Excel Interop process cleanly, even if your application crashes. Below is a summary of the post, and the code copied to this post.

  • Closing the Interop process with Application.Quit() and Process.Kill() works for the most part, but fails if the applications crashes catastrophically. I.e. if the app crashes, the Excel process will still be running loose.
  • The solution is to let the OS handle the cleanup of your processes through Windows Job Objects using Win32 calls. When your main application dies, the associated processes (i.e. Excel) will get terminated as well.

I found this to be a clean solution because the OS is doing real work of cleaning up. All you have to do is register the Excel process.

Windows Job Code

Wraps the Win32 API Calls to register Interop processes.

public enum JobObjectInfoType
{
    AssociateCompletionPortInformation = 7,
    BasicLimitInformation = 2,
    BasicUIRestrictions = 4,
    EndOfJobTimeInformation = 6,
    ExtendedLimitInformation = 9,
    SecurityLimitInformation = 5,
    GroupInformation = 11
}

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
public struct SECURITY_ATTRIBUTES
{
    public int nLength;
    public IntPtr lpSecurityDescriptor;
    public int bInheritHandle;
}

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
struct JOBOBJECT_BASIC_LIMIT_INFORMATION
{
    public Int64 PerProcessUserTimeLimit;
    public Int64 PerJobUserTimeLimit;
    public Int16 LimitFlags;
    public UInt32 MinimumWorkingSetSize;
    public UInt32 MaximumWorkingSetSize;
    public Int16 ActiveProcessLimit;
    public Int64 Affinity;
    public Int16 PriorityClass;
    public Int16 SchedulingClass;
}

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
struct IO_COUNTERS
{
    public UInt64 ReadOperationCount;
    public UInt64 WriteOperationCount;
    public UInt64 OtherOperationCount;
    public UInt64 ReadTransferCount;
    public UInt64 WriteTransferCount;
    public UInt64 OtherTransferCount;
}

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
struct JOBOBJECT_EXTENDED_LIMIT_INFORMATION
{
    public JOBOBJECT_BASIC_LIMIT_INFORMATION BasicLimitInformation;
    public IO_COUNTERS IoInfo;
    public UInt32 ProcessMemoryLimit;
    public UInt32 JobMemoryLimit;
    public UInt32 PeakProcessMemoryUsed;
    public UInt32 PeakJobMemoryUsed;
}

public class Job : IDisposable
{
    [DllImport("kernel32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Unicode)]
    static extern IntPtr CreateJobObject(object a, string lpName);

    [DllImport("kernel32.dll")]
    static extern bool SetInformationJobObject(IntPtr hJob, JobObjectInfoType infoType, IntPtr lpJobObjectInfo, uint cbJobObjectInfoLength);

    [DllImport("kernel32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
    static extern bool AssignProcessToJobObject(IntPtr job, IntPtr process);

    private IntPtr m_handle;
    private bool m_disposed = false;

    public Job()
    {
        m_handle = CreateJobObject(null, null);

        JOBOBJECT_BASIC_LIMIT_INFORMATION info = new JOBOBJECT_BASIC_LIMIT_INFORMATION();
        info.LimitFlags = 0x2000;

        JOBOBJECT_EXTENDED_LIMIT_INFORMATION extendedInfo = new JOBOBJECT_EXTENDED_LIMIT_INFORMATION();
        extendedInfo.BasicLimitInformation = info;

        int length = Marshal.SizeOf(typeof(JOBOBJECT_EXTENDED_LIMIT_INFORMATION));
        IntPtr extendedInfoPtr = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(length);
        Marshal.StructureToPtr(extendedInfo, extendedInfoPtr, false);

        if (!SetInformationJobObject(m_handle, JobObjectInfoType.ExtendedLimitInformation, extendedInfoPtr, (uint)length))
            throw new Exception(string.Format("Unable to set information.  Error: {0}", Marshal.GetLastWin32Error()));
    }

    #region IDisposable Members

    public void Dispose()
    {
        Dispose(true);
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }

    #endregion

    private void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (m_disposed)
            return;

        if (disposing) {}

        Close();
        m_disposed = true;
    }

    public void Close()
    {
        Win32.CloseHandle(m_handle);
        m_handle = IntPtr.Zero;
    }

    public bool AddProcess(IntPtr handle)
    {
        return AssignProcessToJobObject(m_handle, handle);
    }

}

Note about Constructor code

  • In the constructor, the info.LimitFlags = 0x2000; is called. 0x2000 is the JOB_OBJECT_LIMIT_KILL_ON_JOB_CLOSE enum value, and this value is defined by MSDN as:

Causes all processes associated with the job to terminate when the last handle to the job is closed.

Extra Win32 API Call to get the Process ID (PID)

    [DllImport("user32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
    public static extern uint GetWindowThreadProcessId(IntPtr hWnd, out uint lpdwProcessId);

Using the code

    Excel.Application app = new Excel.ApplicationClass();
    Job job = new Job();
    uint pid = 0;
    Win32.GetWindowThreadProcessId(new IntPtr(app.Hwnd), out pid);
    job.AddProcess(Process.GetProcessById((int)pid).Handle);
share|improve this answer
6  
Good answer -- the only correct one, IMO –  kizzx2 Mar 30 '11 at 2:18

This worked for a project I was working on:

excelApp.Quit();
Marshal.ReleaseComObject (excelWB);
Marshal.ReleaseComObject (excelApp);
excelApp = null;

We learned that it was important that every reference to an Excel COM object had to be set to null when you have finished with it. This includes Cells, Sheets, everything.

share|improve this answer
2  
nice! clean and easy! –  eviljack Sep 15 '09 at 15:38

Anything that is in the Excel namespace needs to be Released. Period

You can't be doing:

Worksheet ws = excel.WorkBooks[1].WorkSheets[1];

You have to be doing:

Workbooks books = excel.WorkBooks;
Workbook book = books[1];
Sheets sheets = book.WorkSheets;
Worksheet ws = sheets[1];

followed by the releasing of the objects.

share|improve this answer
2  
How aobut xlRange.Interior.Color for example. –  HAdes Oct 1 '08 at 17:48
    
Interior needs to be release (its in the namespace)... Color on the other hand doesn't (cause its from System.Drawing.Color, iirc) –  MagicKat Oct 1 '08 at 17:56
    
actually Color is a Excel color not a .Net color. you just pass a Long. Also workbooks def. need to be released, worksheets... less so. –  Anonymous Type Mar 2 '10 at 21:16

I found a useful generic template that can help implement the correct disposal pattern for COM objects, that need Marshal.ReleaseComObject called when they go out of scope:

Usage:

using (AutoReleaseComObject<Application> excelApplicationWrapper = new AutoReleaseComObject<Application>(new Application()))
{
    try
    {
        using (AutoReleaseComObject<Workbook> workbookWrapper = new AutoReleaseComObject<Workbook>(excelApplicationWrapper.ComObject.Workbooks.Open(namedRangeBase.FullName, false, false, missing, missing, missing, true, missing, missing, true, missing, missing, missing, missing, missing)))
        {
           // do something with your workbook....
        }
    }
    finally
    {
         excelApplicationWrapper.ComObject.Quit();
    } 
}

Template:

public class AutoReleaseComObject<T> : IDisposable
{
    private T m_comObject;
    private bool m_armed = true;
    private bool m_disposed = false;

    public AutoReleaseComObject(T comObject)
    {
        Debug.Assert(comObject != null);
        m_comObject = comObject;
    }

#if DEBUG
    ~AutoReleaseComObject()
    {
        // We should have been disposed using Dispose().
        Debug.WriteLine("Finalize being called, should have been disposed");

        if (this.ComObject != null)
        {
            Debug.WriteLine(string.Format("ComObject was not null:{0}, name:{1}.", this.ComObject, this.ComObjectName));
        }

        //Debug.Assert(false);
    }
#endif

    public T ComObject
    {
        get
        {
            Debug.Assert(!m_disposed);
            return m_comObject;
        }
    }

    private string ComObjectName
    {
        get
        {
            if(this.ComObject is Microsoft.Office.Interop.Excel.Workbook)
            {
                return ((Microsoft.Office.Interop.Excel.Workbook)this.ComObject).Name;
            }

            return null;
        }
    }

    public void Disarm()
    {
        Debug.Assert(!m_disposed);
        m_armed = false;
    }

    #region IDisposable Members

    public void Dispose()
    {
        Dispose(true);
#if DEBUG
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
#endif
    }

    #endregion

    protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (!m_disposed)
        {
            if (m_armed)
            {
                int refcnt = 0;
                do
                {
                    refcnt = System.Runtime.InteropServices.Marshal.ReleaseComObject(m_comObject);
                } while (refcnt > 0);

                m_comObject = default(T);
            }

            m_disposed = true;
        }
    }
}

Reference:

http://www.deez.info/sengelha/2005/02/11/useful-idisposable-class-3-autoreleasecomobject/

share|improve this answer
2  
yup this one is good. I think this code can be updated though now that FinalReleaseCOMObject is available. –  Anonymous Type Mar 2 '10 at 21:22
    
It's still annoying to have a using block for each object. See here stackoverflow.com/questions/2191489/… for an alternative. –  Henrik Jun 27 '12 at 14:16

Common developers, none of your solutions worked for me, so I decide to implement a new trick.

First let specify "What is our goal?" => "Not to see excel object after our job in task manager"

Ok. Let no to challenge and start destroying it, but consider not to destroy other instance os Excel which are running in parallel.

So , get the list of current processors and fetch PID of EXCEL processes , then once your job is done, we have a new guest in processes list with a unique PID ,find and destroy just that one.

< keep in mind any new excel process during your excel job will be detected as new and destroyed > < A better solution is to capture PID of new created excel object and just destroy that>

Process[] prs = Process.GetProcesses();
List<int> excelPID = new List<int>();
foreach (Process p in prs)
   if (p.ProcessName == "EXCEL")
       excelPID.Add(p.Id);

.... // your job 

prs = Process.GetProcesses();
foreach (Process p in prs)
   if (p.ProcessName == "EXCEL" && !excelPID.Contains(p.Id))
       p.Kill();

This resolves my issue, hope yours too.

share|improve this answer

I cant believe this problem has haunted the world for 5 years.... If you have created an application, you need to shut it down first before removing the link.

objExcel = new Excel.Application();  
objBook = (Excel.Workbook)(objExcel.Workbooks.Add(Type.Missing)); 

when closing

objBook.Close(true, Type.Missing, Type.Missing); 
objExcel.Application.Quit();
objExcel.Quit(); 

When you new an excel application, it opens a excel program in the background. You need to command that excel program to quit before you release the link because that excel program is not part of your direct control. Therefore, it will stay open if the link is released!

Good programming everyone~~

share|improve this answer

To add to reasons why Excel does not close, even when you create direct refrences to each object upon read, creation, is the 'For' loop.

For Each objWorkBook As WorkBook in objWorkBooks 'local ref, created from ExcelApp.WorkBooks to avoid the double-dot
   objWorkBook.Close 'or whatever
   FinalReleaseComObject(objWorkBook)
   objWorkBook = Nothing
Next 

'The above does not work, and this is the workaround:

For intCounter As Integer = 1 To mobjExcel_WorkBooks.Count
   Dim objTempWorkBook As Workbook = mobjExcel_WorkBooks.Item(intCounter)
   objTempWorkBook.Saved = True
   objTempWorkBook.Close(False, Type.Missing, Type.Missing)
   FinalReleaseComObject(objTempWorkBook)
   objTempWorkBook = Nothing
Next
share|improve this answer
    
And another reason, re-using a reference without releasing the previous value first. –  Grimfort Dec 6 '10 at 15:02
    
Thank you. I was also using a "for each" your solution worked for me. –  Chad Braun-Duin Jan 14 '11 at 13:41
    
+1 Thanks. Plus, note that if you have an object for an Excel range, and you want to change the range during the lifetime of the object, I found that I had to ReleaseComObject before reassigning it, which makes the code a little untidy! –  AjV Jsy Oct 10 at 16:26

You need to be aware that Excel is very sensitive to the culture you are running under as well.

You may find that you need to set the culture to EN-US before calling Excel functions. This does not apply to all functions - but some of them.

    CultureInfo en_US = new System.Globalization.CultureInfo("en-US"); 
    System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture = en_US;
    string filePathLocal = _applicationObject.ActiveWorkbook.Path;
    System.Threading.Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture = orgCulture;

This applies even if you are using VSTO.

For details: http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;Q320369

share|improve this answer

The accepted answer here is correct, but also take note that not only "two dot" references need to be avoided, but also objects that are retrieved via the index. You also do not need to wait until you are finished with the program to clean up these objects, it's best to create functions that will clean them up as soon as you're finished with them, when possible. Here is a function I created that assigns some properties of a Style object called xlStyleHeader:

public Excel.Style xlStyleHeader = null;

private void CreateHeaderStyle()
{
    Excel.Styles xlStyles = null;
    Excel.Font xlFont = null;
    Excel.Interior xlInterior = null;
    Excel.Borders xlBorders = null;
    Excel.Border xlBorderBottom = null;

    try
    {
        xlStyles = xlWorkbook.Styles;
        xlStyleHeader = xlStyles.Add("Header", Type.Missing);

        // Text Format
        xlStyleHeader.NumberFormat = "@";

        // Bold
        xlFont = xlStyleHeader.Font;
        xlFont.Bold = true;

        // Light Gray Cell Color
        xlInterior = xlStyleHeader.Interior;
        xlInterior.Color = 12632256;

        // Medium Bottom border
        xlBorders = xlStyleHeader.Borders;
        xlBorderBottom = xlBorders[Excel.XlBordersIndex.xlEdgeBottom];
        xlBorderBottom.Weight = Excel.XlBorderWeight.xlMedium;
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        throw ex;
    }
    finally
    {
        Release(xlBorderBottom);
        Release(xlBorders);
        Release(xlInterior);
        Release(xlFont);
        Release(xlStyles);
    }
}

private void Release(object obj)
{
    // Errors are ignored per Microsoft's suggestion for this type of function:
    // http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx/kb/317109
    try
    {
        System.Runtime.InteropServices.Marshal.ReleaseComObject(obj);
    }
    catch { } 
}

Notice that I had to set xlBorders[Excel.XlBordersIndex.xlEdgeBottom] to a variable in order to clean that up (Not because of the two dots, which refer to an enumeration which does not need to be released, but because the object I'm referring to is actually a Border object that does need to be released).

This sort of thing is not really necessary in standard applications, which do a great job of cleaning up after themselves, but in ASP.NET applications, if you miss even one of these, no matter how often you call the garbage collector, Excel will still be running on your server.

It requires a lot of attention to detail and many test executions while monitoring the Task Manager when writing this code, but doing so saves you the hassle of desperately searching through pages of code to find the one instance you missed. This is especially important when working in loops, where you need to release EACH INSTANCE of an object, even though it uses the same variable name each time it loops.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the objects retreived through indexes. –  Jeroen Wiert Pluimers Jun 7 '13 at 12:24

'Never use 2 dots with com objects' is a great rule of thumb to avoid 'leakage' of com references but Excel PIA can lead to leakage in more ways than apparent at first sight.

One of these ways is subscribing to any event exposed by any of the Excel object model's COM object

For e.g. subscribing to Application class's WorkbookOpen event.

Some theory on COM events

COM classes expose a group of events through call-back interfaces. In order to subscribe to events, the client code can simply register an object implementing the call-back interface and the COM class will invoke its methods in response to specific events. Since the call-back interface is a COM interface, it is the duty of the implementing object to decrement the reference count of any COM object it receives (as a parameter) for any of the event handlers.

How Excel PIA expose COM Events

Excel PIA exposes COM events of Excel Application class as conventional .Net events. Whenever the client code subscribes to a .Net event (emphasis on 'a'), PIA creates an instance of a class implementing the call-back interface and registers it with Excel. Hence, a number of call-back objects get registered with Excel in response to different subscription requests from the .Net code. One call-back object per event subscription.

A call-back interface for event handling means that, PIA has to subscribe to all interface events for every .Net event subscription request. It cannot pick and choose. On receiving an event call-back, the call-back object checks if the associated .Net event handler is interested in the current event or not and then either invokes the handler or silently ignores the call-back.

Effect on COM instance reference counts

All these call-back objects do not decrement the reference count of any of the COM objects they receive (as parameters) for any of the call-back methods (even for the ones that are silently ignored). They rely solely on the CLR garbage collector to free up the COM objects.

Since GC run is un-deterministic, this can leads to the holding off of Excel process for a longer duration than desired and create an impression of 'memory leak'.

Solution

Only solution as of now is to avoid the PIA’s event provider for the COM class and write your own event provider which deterministically releases COM objects.

For Application class, this can be done by implementing AppEvents interface and then registering the implementation with Excel by using IConnectionPointContainer interface. Application class (and for that matter all COM objects exposing events using callback mechanism) implements the IConnectionPointContainer interface.

share|improve this answer

This sure seems like it has been over-complicated. From my experience, there are just three key things to get Excel to close properly:

1: make sure there are no remaining references to the excel application you created (you should only have one anyway; set it to null)

2: call GC.Collect()

3: Excel has to be closed, either by the user manually closing the program, or by you calling Quit on the Excel object. (Note that Quit will function just as if the user tried to close the program, and will present a confirmation dialog if there are unsaved changes, even if Excel is not visible. The user could press cancel, and then Excel will not have been closed.)

1 needs to happen before 2, but 3 can happen anytime.

One way to implement this is to wrap the interop Excel object with your own class, create the interop instance in the constructor, and implement IDisposable with Dispose looking something like

if (!mDisposed) {
   mExcel = null;
   GC.Collect();
   mDisposed = true;
}

That will clean up excel from your program's side of things. Once Excel is closed (manually by the user or by you calling Quit) the process will go away. If the program has already been closed, then the process will disappear on the GC.Collect() call.

(I'm not sure how important it is, but you may want a GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers() call after the GC.Collect() call but it is not strictly necessary to get rid of the Excel process.)

This has worked for me without issue for years. Keep in mind though that while this works, you actually have to close gracefully for it to work. You will still get accumulating excel.exe processes if you interrupt your program before Excel is cleaned up (usually by hitting "stop" while your program is being debugged).

share|improve this answer

When all the stuff above didn't work, try giving Excel some time to close its sheets:

app.workbooks.Close();
Thread.Sleep(500); // adjust, for me it works at around 300+
app.Quit();

...
FinalReleaseComObject(app);
share|improve this answer
2  
I hate arbitrary waits. But +1 because you are right about needding to wait for the workbooks to close. An alternative is to poll the workbooks collection in a loop and use the arbitrary wait as the loop timeout. –  dFlat Jul 14 '11 at 2:20

I've traditionally followed the advice found in @VVS answer. However, in an effort to keep this answer up-to-date with the latest options, I think all my future projects will use the "NetOffice" library, available on CodePlex.

NetOffice is a complete replacement for the Office PIAs, and is completely version-agnostic. It's a collection of Managed COM wrappers that can handle the cleanup that often causes such headaches when working with Office in .NET.

Some key features are: - Mostly version-independant (and version-dependant features are documented) - No dependencies - No PIA - No registration - No VSTO

I am in no way affiliated with the project; I just genuinely appreciate the stark reduction in headaches.

share|improve this answer

After trying:

  1. release com objects in reverse order
  2. add GC.Collect() and GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers() twice at the end
  3. no more than two dots
  4. close workbook and quit application
  5. run in release mode

the final solution that works for me is to move one set of
GC.Collect();
GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();

that we added to the end of the function to a wrapper, as the follows:

private void FunctionWrapper(string sourcePath, string targetPath)
{
    try
    {
        FunctionThatCallsExcel(sourcePath, targetPath);
    }
    finally
    {
        GC.Collect();
        GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();
    }
}

Many thanks to NightCoder!

share|improve this answer

As others have pointed out, you need to create an explicit reference for every Excel object you use, and call Marshal.ReleaseComObject on that reference, as described in this KB article. You also need to use try/finally to ensure ReleaseComObject is always called, even when an exception is thrown. I.e. instead of:

Worksheet sheet = excelApp.Worksheets(1)
... do something with sheet

you need to do something like:

Worksheets sheets = null;
Worksheet sheet = null
try
{ 
    sheets = excelApp.Worksheets;
    sheet = sheets(1);
    ...
}
finally
{
    if (sheets != null) Marshal.ReleaseComObject(sheets);
    if (sheet != null) Marshal.ReleaseComObject(sheet);
}

You also need to call Application.Quit before releasing the Application object if you want Excel to close.

As you can see, this quickly becomes extremely unwieldy as soon as you try to do anything even moderately complex. I have successfully developed .NET applications with a simple wrapper class that wraps a few simple manipulations of the Excel object model (open a workbook, write to a Range, save/close the workbook etc). The wrapper class implements IDisposable, carefully implements Marshal.ReleaseComObject on every object it uses, and does not pubicly expose any Excel objects to the rest of the app.

But this approach doesn't scale well for more complex requirements.

This is a big deficiency of .NET COM Interop. For more complex scenarios, I would seriously consider writing an ActiveX DLL in VB6 or other unmanaged language to which you can delegate all interaction with out-proc COM objects such as Office. You can then reference this ActiveX DLL from your .NET application, and things will be much easier as you will only need to release this one reference.

share|improve this answer
    
brilliant! +1.. –  nawfal Oct 11 '11 at 11:40

You should be very careful using word/excel interop applications. After trying all the solutions we still had a lot of "WinWord" process left open on server (with more than 2000 users). After working on the problem for hours, I realized that if I open more than a couple of documents using Word.ApplicationClass.Document.Open() on different threads simultaneously, IIS worker process(w3wp.exe) would crash leaving all WinWord processes open! So I guess there is no absolute solution to this problem but switching to other methods such as OpenXml development.

share|improve this answer

Make sure that you release all objects related to Excel!

I spent a few hours by trying several ways. All are great ideas but I finally found my mistake: If you don't release all objects, none of the ways above can help you like in my case. Make sure you release all objects including range one!

Excel.Range rng = (Excel.Range)worksheet.Cells[1, 1];
worksheet.Paste(rng, false);
releaseObject(rng);

The options are together here.

share|improve this answer
    
Very good point! I think because I am using Office 2007 there is some clean-up done on my behalf. I have used the advise further up but have not stored variables as you have suggested here and EXCEL.EXE does exit but I could just be lucky and if I have any further problems I will definitely look at this part of my code =) –  CodeBlend Nov 26 '12 at 13:39

Great article on Releasing COM objects here.

The method that I would advocate is to null your Excel.Interop references if they are non-local variables, and then call GC.Collect() and GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers() twice. Locally scoped Interop variables will be taken care of automatically.

This removes of the need to keep a named reference for every COM object.

Here's an example taken from the article:

public class Test {

    // these instance variables must be nulled or Excel will not quit
    private Excel.Application xl;
    private Excel.Workbook book;

    public void DoSomething()
    {
        xl = new Excel.Application(); 
        xl.Visible = true;
        book = xl.Workbooks.Add(Type.Missing); 

        // these variables are locally scoped, so we need not worry about them
        // notice I don't care about using two dots
        Excel.Range rng = book.Worksheets[1].UsedRange;  
    }

    public void CleanUp()
    {
        book = null;
        xl.Quit();
        xl = null;

        GC.Collect(); 
        GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers(); 
        GC.Collect(); 
        GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers(); 
    }
}

These words are straight from the article:

In almost all situations, nulling the RCW reference and forcing a garbage collection will clean up properly. If you also call GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers, garbage collection will be as deterministic as you can make it. That is, you'll be pretty sure exactly when the object has been cleaned up—on the return from the second call to WaitForPendingFinalizers. As an alternative, you can use Marshal.ReleaseComObject. However, note that you are very unlikely to ever need to use this method.

share|improve this answer
    
Note that the referenced msdn article pertains to Office 2003... –  Rachel Hettinger Jul 30 '13 at 17:51

I followed this exactly.. but I still ran into issues 1 out of 1000 times. Who knows why. Time to bring out the hammer..

Right after the Excel Application class is instantiated I get a hold of the Excel process that was just created.

excel = new Microsoft.Office.Interop.Excel.Application();
var process = Process.GetProcessesByName("EXCEL").OrderByDescending(p => p.StartTime).First();

Then once Ive done all the above COM clean-up, I make sure that process isnt running. If it is still running, kill it!

if (!process.HasExited)
   process.Kill();
share|improve this answer

I think that some of that is just the way that the framework handles Office applications, but I could be wrong. On some days, some applications clean up the processes immediately, other days it seems to wait until the application closes, in general I quit paying attention to the details and just make sure that there aren't any extra processes floating around at the end of the day.

Also, and maybe I'm over simplifying things, but I think you can just...

objExcel = new Excel.Application(); 
objBook = (Excel.Workbook)(objExcel.Workbooks.Add(Type.Missing)); 
DoSomeStuff(objBook);
SaveTheBook(objBook);
objBook.Close(false, Type.Missing, Type.Missing);
objExcel.Quit();

Like I said earlier, I don't tend to pay attention to the details of when the Excel process appears or disappears, but that usually works for me. I also don't like to keep Excel processes around for anything other than the minimal amount of time, but I'm probably just being paranoid on that.

share|improve this answer

Excel is not designed to be programmed via C++ or C#. The COM API is specifically designed to work with Visual Basic / VB.Net/VBA.

Also all the code samples in this thread are not optimal for the simple reason that each call must cross a managed/unmanaged boundary and further ignore the fact that the Excel COM API is free to fail any call with a cryptic hresult indicating the RPC server is busy.

The best way to automate excel in my opinion is to collect your data into as big an array as possible / feasible and send this across to a VBA function or sub (via Application.Run) which then performs any required processing. Furthermore - when calling Application.Run - be sure to watch for exceptions indicating excel is busy and retry calling Application.Run.

share|improve this answer
3  
C# and VB.NET all run under the CLR,so it can't be designed for VB.NET and not C#. They are the ultimately the same thing, just with different language semantics for building an application. –  Dominic Zukiewicz May 2 '12 at 10:16
    
Please try calling the Run method from the excel Application object in C# ( ver 3.0 and earlier) or C++. Then try doing the same from VB.net. After the 10th or 12th missing parameter you pass in - you will probably realize what I meant :] –  quixver May 17 '12 at 18:24
    
Also - like you mentioned - C# and VB.net are both CLR languages. They offer programmers varying subsets of the CLR's functionality along with various syntactic sugar. It just so happens that the subset offered by VB.net makes com and excel programming easier. –  quixver May 17 '12 at 18:27
    
But again, thats just semantics of the language (prior to v3.5). I do indeed feel the pain of Application.Run(Missing.Value, Missing.Value, Missing.Value, Missing.Value, Missing.Value, Missing.Value, Missing.Value, Missing.Value, Missing.Value, Missing.Value, Missing.Value, Missing.Value, Missing.Value, Missing.Value,,Missing.Value, Missing.Value, Missing.Value, Missing.Value, Missing.Value); which VB has had, even before .NET. The managed libraries of Microsoft.Office.Tools DLL makes it easy peesy to do all this stuff without any COM cleanup at all, as its all managed wrapper. –  Dominic Zukiewicz May 17 '12 at 19:33
1  
Excel is not designed to be programmed via C++ or C# - is incorrect information. –  Jeremy Thompson Sep 27 '12 at 4:59

As some have probably already written. It's not just important how you close the Excel (object), it's also important how you open it and also by the type of the project.

In WPF application basically the same code is working without or with very less problems.

I have a project in which same Excel file is being processed several times for different parameter value - e.g. parsing it based on values inside generic list.

I put all Excel related functions into base class, and parser into subclass (different parsers use common Excel functions). I didn't want that Excel is opened and closed again for each item in generic list so I've opened it only once in base class and close it in subclass. I had problems when moving the code into desktop application. I've tried many of the above mentioned solutions. GC.Collect () was already implemented before, twice as suggested.

Then I've decided that I will move code for opening Excel to subclass. Instead of opening only once, now I create new object (base class) and open Excel for every item and close it in the end.There is some performance penalty but based on several test Excel processes are closing without problems (in debug mode) so also temp files are removed. I will continue with testing and write some more if I will get some updates.

Best regards

The bottom line is: you must also check the initialize code, especially if you have many classes, etc.

share|improve this answer

The two dots rule did not work for me. In my case I created a method to clean my resources as follows:

private static void Clean()
{
    workBook.Close();
    Marshall.ReleaseComObject(workBook);
    excel.Quit();
    CG.Collect();
    CG.WaitForPendingFinalizers();
}
share|improve this answer

¨°º¤ø„¸ Kill Excel process - Dirty - No long speeches ¸„ø¤º°¨

public class MyExcelInteropClass
{
    Excel.Application xlApp;
    Excel.Workbook xlBook;

    public void dothingswithExcel() 
    {
        try { /* Do stuff manipulating cells sheets and workbooks ... */ }
        catch {}
        finally {KillExcelProcess(xlApp);}
    }

    static void KillExcelProcess(Excel.Application xlApp)
    {
        if (xlApp != null)
        {
            int excelProcessId = 0;
            GetWindowThreadProcessId(xlApp.Hwnd, out excelProcessId);
            Process p = Process.GetProcessById(excelProcessId);
            p.Kill();
            xlApp = null;
        }
    }

    [DllImport("user32.dll")]
    static extern int GetWindowThreadProcessId(int hWnd, out int lpdwProcessId);
}
share|improve this answer
[DllImport("user32.dll")]
private static extern uint GetWindowThreadProcessId(IntPtr hWnd, out uint lpdwProcessId);

Declare it & add code in finally block

finally
{        
    GC.Collect();
    GC.WaitForPendingFinalizers();
    if (excelApp != null)
    {
        excelApp.Quit();
        int hWnd = excelApp.Application.Hwnd;
        uint processID;
        GetWindowThreadProcessId((IntPtr)hWnd, out processID);
        Process[] procs = Process.GetProcessesByName("EXCEL");
        foreach (Process p in procs)
        {
            if (p.Id == processID)
                p.Kill();
        }
        Marshal.FinalReleaseComObject(excelApp);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

My solution

[DllImport("user32.dll")]
static extern int GetWindowThreadProcessId(int hWnd, out int lpdwProcessId);

private void GenerateExcel()
{
    var excel = new Microsoft.Office.Interop.Excel.Application();
    int id;
    // Find the Excel Process Id (ath the end, you kill him
    GetWindowThreadProcessId(excel.Hwnd, out id);
    Process excelProcess = Process.GetProcessById(id);

try
{
    // Your code
}
finally
{
    excel.Quit();

    // Kill him !
    excelProcess.Kill();
}
share|improve this answer

The accepted answer did not work for me. The following code in the destructor did the job.

if (xlApp != null)
{
    xlApp.Workbooks.Close();
    xlApp.Quit();
}

System.Diagnostics.Process[] processArray = System.Diagnostics.Process.GetProcessesByName("EXCEL");
foreach (System.Diagnostics.Process process in processArray)
{
    if (process.MainWindowTitle.Length == 0) { process.Kill(); }
}
share|improve this answer

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