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Background: I'm doing some user interface tests that need to detect if people are paying attention or not. But, this question is not about the page visibility API.

Specifically, I would like to know how my Javascript code will be affected if the current tab is not active, or the browser window is not active, in different browsers. I've dug up the following so far:

I have the following questions:

  • Other than mobile browsers, do desktop browsers ever pause JS execution when a tab is not active? When and which browsers?
  • Which browsers reduce the setInterval repeat? Is it just reduced to a limit or by a percentage? For example, if I have a 10ms repeat versus a 5000ms repeat, how will each be affected?
  • Do these changes happen if the window is out of focus, as opposed to just the tab? (I imagine it would be harder to detect, as it requires the OS API.)
  • Are there any other effects that would not be observed in an active tab? Could they mess things up that would otherwise execute correctly (i.e. the aforementioned Jasmine tests)?
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If they are paused, sites like Facebook wouldn't receive any chat messages on background tabs. –  Joseph the Dreamer Apr 8 '13 at 5:38
    
+1 This doesn't happen anywhere, it wouldn't surprise me if (some) browsers lessoned the priority of setInterval, but I doubt it would make much difference. –  Josh Mc Apr 8 '13 at 5:40
8  
@ProfPickle Webmasters? Really? This is a JS programming question. –  Andrew Mao Apr 8 '13 at 6:26
1  
@lan setInterval/setTimeout times under 1000ms are changed to 1000ms when the tab/window is blurred. Not clear what you tried to convey –  Amol M Kulkarni Apr 8 '13 at 8:04
2  
+1 Great question. It would be good to see a side by side comparison of browser behaviours, as I believe the clamping behaviour when tabs are not active is not part of any standard. –  UpTheCreek Apr 8 '13 at 8:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 34 down vote accepted
+100

Test One

I have written a test specifically for this purpose:
Frame Rate Distribution: setInterval vs requestAnimationFrame

Note: This test is quite CPU intensive. requestAnimationFrame is not supported by IE (except IE 10) and Opera.

The test logs the actual time it takes for a setInterval and requestAnimationFrame to run in different browsers, and gives you the results in the form of a distribution. You can change the number of milliseconds for setInterval to see how it runs under different settings. setTimeout works similarly to a setInterval with respect to delays. requestAnimationFrame generally defaults to the 60fps depending on the browser. To see what happens when you switch to a different tab or have an inactive window, simply open the page, switch to a different tab and wait for a while. It will continue to log the actual time it takes for these functions in an inactive tab.

Test Two

Another way to test it is to log the timestamp repeatedly with setInterval and requestAnimationFrame and view it in a detached console. You can see how frequently it is updated (or if it is ever updated) when you make the tab or window inactive.

Results

Internet Explorer
IE does not limit the delay in setInterval when the tab is inactive. However, IE10 pauses requestAnimationFrame in inactive tabs. It does not matter whether the window is out of focus or not.

Safari
Safari does not pause setInterval when the tab or window is inactive. It continues to run at the normal repeating intervals as if the tab or window is always active. requestAnimationFrame is paused in inactive tabs.

Firefox
Firefox limits the minimum interval of setInterval to around 1000ms when the tab is inactive. If the interval is higher than 1000ms, it will run at the specified interval. It does not matter if the window is out of focus, the interval is limited only when you switch to a different tab. requestAnimationFrame is capped at a frame per 1-3 seconds when the tab is inactive.

// The default shortest interval/timeout we permit
#define DEFAULT_MIN_TIMEOUT_VALUE 4 // 4ms
#define DEFAULT_MIN_BACKGROUND_TIMEOUT_VALUE 1000 // 1000ms

https://hg.mozilla.org/releases/mozilla-release/file/0bf1cadfb004/dom/base/nsGlobalWindow.cpp#l296

Chrome
Similar to Firefox, Chrome limits the minimum interval of setInterval to around 1000ms when the tab (not the window) is inactive. requestAnimationFrame is paused when the tab is inactive.

// Provides control over the minimum timer interval for background tabs.
const double kBackgroundTabTimerInterval = 1.0;

https://codereview.chromium.org/6546021/patch/1001/2001

Opera
Opera does not limit setInterval when the tab is inactive. requestAnimationFrame is not supported.

Summary

Repeating intervals for inactive tabs:

           setInterval     requestAnimationFrame
IE         not affected    paused
Safari     not affected    paused
Firefox    >=1000ms        1s - 3s
Chrome     >=1000ms        paused
Opera      not affected    not supported
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Great answer. Any other possible known differences for functions other than setInterval and requestAnimationFrame? –  Andrew Mao Apr 16 '13 at 20:11
    
@AndrewMao Not that I am aware of. I came across this issue when I was working on a library to reliably detect if JS reenabled with setInterval and requestAnimationFrame. The thing I know about is that setTimeout behaves similarly to setInterval, in that they both have the same minimum background interval in Firefox and Chrome, and no apparent limit in other browsers. –  Antony Apr 16 '13 at 20:39

What I observed : on inactive tabs in Chrome, all your setTimeout (must be the same for setInterval) waiting less than 1000ms are rounded to 1000ms. I think longer timeouts are not modified.

Seems to be the behavior since Chrome 11 and Firefox 5.0 : https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/DOM/window.setTimeout#Inactive_tabs

Furthermore, I don't think it behaves this way when the whole window is inactive (but it seems quite easy to investigate).

share|improve this answer
    
jQuery's focus and blur events seem to detect both tab and window switches, so it could conceivably work both ways. But I wonder how the window detects if it's actually visible or not. –  Andrew Mao Apr 10 '13 at 16:16
1  
Actually it has no connection with jQuery or Javascript as it is internal browser implementation. –  Paulloz Apr 10 '13 at 19:39

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