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I am trying to retrieve data from a Gridview that I have created in XAML.

<ListView Name="chartListView" selectionChanged="chartListView_SelectionChanged">
  <ListView.View>
     <GridView>
        <GridViewColumn Header="Name" DisplayMemberBinding="{Binding Name}" Width="250"/>
        <GridViewColumn Header="Type" DisplayMemberBinding="{Binding Type}" Width="60"/>
        <GridViewColumn Header="ID" DisplayMemberBinding="{Binding ID}" Width="100"/>
     </GridView>
  </ListView.View>
</ListView>

I have seen some code like this :-

GridViewRow row = GridView1.SelectedRow;
TextBox2.Text = row.Cells[2].Text;

However my problem is that my GridView is created in XAML, and is not named, ie I cannot (or do not know how to) create a reference to 'gridview1', and therefore cannot access objects within it.

Can I name or create a reference to my gridview either from c# or XAML so I can use the above code?

Secondly, can I then access the array elements by name instead of index, something like :-

TextBox2.Text = row.Cells["ID"].Text

Thanks for any help.

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2 Answers 2

Yes you can name your gridview:

<GridView x:Name="chartGridView">
    ...
</GridView>

Make sure the following is included in the Window definition:

xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"

This will enable you to reference it from your c# code.

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sorry, that was the first thing I tried. VS says : the property "Name" was not found in type GridView –  Will Oct 19 '09 at 10:22
    
This makes it visible in the code behind. Is there a way to make it visible from a view model? –  Jeff Oct 21 '13 at 16:00
    
@Jeff - You shouldn't be mixing your view and view model like that. –  ChrisF Oct 21 '13 at 16:03

You're doing something horribly wrong. You should not be trying to read data from grid cells, but from your business objects directly. And you should avoid procedural code when a pure XAML solution exists:

<TextBox x:Name="TextBox2" Text={Binding SelectedItem.ID, ElementName=chartListView}"/>

WPF is not intended to be used like you're trying to. So reading individual grid cells is a dirty hack. That said, it goes something like this:

string UglyHack(string name)
{
    var columns = (chartListView.View as GridView).Columns;
    int index = -1;
    for (int i = 0; i < columns.Count; ++i)
    {
        if ((columns[i].Header as TextBlock).Text == name)
        {
            index = i;
            break;
        }
    }
    DependencyObject j = SelectedListView.ItemContainerGenerator.ContainerFromIndex(SelectedListView.SelectedIndex);
    while (!(j is GridViewRowPresenter)) j = VisualTreeHelper.GetChild(j, 0);
    return (VisualTreeHelper.GetChild(j, index) as TextBlock).Text;
}
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