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I would like to know what's the logic for multiple joins (for example below)

SELECT * FROM B returns 100 rows

SELECT B.* FROM B LEFT JOIN C ON B.ID = C.ID returns 120 rows

As I know using left join will returns any matching data from the left table which is B if data are found for both table. But how come when using left join, it returns more data than table B itself?

What am I do wrong or misunderstood here? Any guidance are very appreciated. Thanks in advance.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Let be table B:

id
----
1
2
3

Let be table C

id     name
------------
1      John
2      Mary
2      Anne
3      Stef

Any id from b is matched with ids from c, then id=2 will be matched twice. So a left join on id will return 4 rows even if base table B has 3 rows.

Now look at a more evil example:

Table B

id
----
1
2
2
3
4

table C

id     name
------------
1      John
2      Mary
2      Anne
3      Stef

Every id from b is matched with ids from c, then first id=2 will be matched twice and second id=2 will be matched twice so the result of

select b.id, c.name
from b left join c on (b.id = c.id)

will be

id     name
------------
1      John
2      Mary
2      Mary
2      Anne
2      Anne
3      Stef
4      (null)

The id=4 is not matched but appears in the result because is a left join.

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May I know how do you format your query result? Thanks –  Tan Siong Zhe Apr 9 '13 at 2:29
    
You are talking about formatting text on Stack Overflow? You have a button when you are in Edit mode. Its effect is to indent the lines with 4 or 5 spaces and the result is code style formatting. –  Florin Ghita Apr 9 '13 at 5:17
    
Hi again, so I use DISTINCT to eliminate the duplicate data retrieved from C then my query output will be data only from B right? –  Tan Siong Zhe Apr 15 '13 at 1:31
    
Hmm, not really. This depends on what columns you select. –  Florin Ghita Apr 16 '13 at 6:39
    
I use SELECT DISTINCT * –  Tan Siong Zhe Apr 16 '13 at 7:02

Look at the following example :

B = {1,2}
C = {(1,a),(1,b),(1,c),(1,d),(1,e)}

The result of B left join C will be :

1 | a
1 | b
1 | c
1 | d
1 | e
2 | null

The number of rows in the result is definitely larger than rows in B (2).

In general the number of rows in result of B left join C is bounded by B.size + C.size and not only by B.size as you think...

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As per your query it do the join to B Table with C and B table is Left Table so it will display all the records of Left table in our case it is B and related from other Table in our Case it is C.

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