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The following code compiles and runs well. But where is the return statement for the Consumer() and Producer() methods?

class Program
{
    static BufferBlock<Int32> m_buffer = new BufferBlock<int>(
        new DataflowBlockOptions { BoundedCapacity = 10 });

public static async Task Producer()   <----- How is a Task object returned?
{
    while (true)
    {
        await m_buffer.SendAsync<Int32>(DateTime.Now.Second);
        Thread.Sleep(1000);
    }
}


public static async Task Consumer() <----- How is a Task object returned?
{
    while (true)
    {
        Int32 n = await m_buffer.ReceiveAsync<Int32>();
        Console.WriteLine(n);
    }
}


static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Task.WaitAll(Consumer(), Producer());
}
}
share|improve this question
    
But the Task.WaitAll() only accepts Tasks as its parameter. But compiler seems totally ok with this. –  smwikipedia Apr 8 '13 at 7:42
    
I think the While(true) is irrelevant. Because I removed the while(true) loop, it still works. –  smwikipedia Apr 8 '13 at 7:44

4 Answers 4

While your question states the obvious - the code compiles - and the other answers try to explain-by-example, I think the answer is best described in the following two articles:

  1. "Above-the-surface" answer - full article is here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/hh456401.aspx

[...] C# and Visual Basic [...] giving enough hints to the compilers to build the necessary mechanisms for you behind the scenes. The solution has two parts: one in the type system, and one in the language.

The CLR 4 release defined the type Task [...] to represent the concept of “some work that’s going to produce a result of type T in the future.” The concept of “work that will complete in the future but returns no result” is represented by the non-generic Task type.

Precisely how the result of type T is going to be produced in the future is an implementation detail of a particular task; [...]

The language half of the solution is the new await keyword. A regular method call means “remember what you’re doing, run this method until it’s completely finished, and then pick up where you left off, now knowing the result of the method.” An await expression, in contrast, means “evaluate this expression to obtain an object representing work that will in the future produce a result. Sign up the remainder of the current method as the callback associated with the continuation of that task. Once the task is produced and the callback is signed up, immediately return control to my caller.”

2.The under-the-hood explanation is found here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/hh456403.aspx

[...] Visual Basic and C# [...] let you express discontinuous sequential code. [...] When the Visual Basic or C# compiler gets hold of an asynchronous method, it mangles it quite a bit during compilation: the discontinuity of the method is not directly supported by the underlying runtime and must be emulated by the compiler. So instead of you having to pull the method apart into bits, the compiler does it for you. [...]

The compiler turns your asynchronous method into a statemachine. The state machine keeps track of where you are in the execution and what your local state is. [...]

Asynchronous methods produce Tasks. More specifically, an asynchronous method returns an instance of one of the types Task or Task from System.Threading.Tasks, and that instance is automatically generated. It doesn’t have to be (and can’t be) supplied by the user code. [...]

From the compiler’s point of view, producing Tasks is the easy part. It relies on a framework-supplied notion of a Task builder, found in System.Runtime.CompilerServices [...] The builder lets the compiler obtain a Task, and then lets it complete the Task with a result or an Exception. [...] Task builders are special helper types meant only for compiler consumption. [...]

[...] build up a state machine around the production and consumption of the Tasks. Essentially, all the user logic from the original method is put into the resumption delegate, but the declarations of locals are lifted out so they can survive multiple invocations. Furthermore, a state variable is introduced to track how far things have gotten, and the user logic in the resumption delegate is wrapped in a big switch that looks at the state and jumps to a corresponding label. So whenever resumption is called, it will jump right back to where it left off the last time.

share|improve this answer
    
I will take a good look at the 2 articles tonight. Thanks. –  smwikipedia Apr 9 '13 at 1:28

when the method has no return statement its return type is Task. Have a look at the MSDN page of Async Await

Async methods have three possible return types: Task<TResult>, Task, void

if you need a Task you must specify the return statement. Taken from the MSDN page:

// TASK<T> EXAMPLE
async Task<int> TaskOfT_MethodAsync()
{
   // The body of the method is expected to contain an awaited asynchronous 
   // call. 
   // Task.FromResult is a placeholder for actual work that returns a string. 
   var today = await Task.FromResult<string>(DateTime.Now.DayOfWeek.ToString());

   // The method then can process the result in some way. 
   int leisureHours;
   if (today.First() == 'S')
      leisureHours = 16;
   else
     leisureHours = 5;

    // Because the return statement specifies an operand of type int, the 
    // method must have a return type of Task<int>. 
    return leisureHours;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, but I didn't see in that MSDN page that an implicit Task returning value is mentioned. Though in the IL code, it does return a Task explicitly. –  smwikipedia Apr 9 '13 at 1:27

async keyword kind of tells compiler that the method body should be used as a Task body. In simple way we can say that these are equivalents to your examples:

public static Task Producer()   <----- How is a Task object returned?
{
    return Task.Run(() => 
           {
               while (true)
               {
                    m_buffer.SendAsync<Int32>(DateTime.Now.Second).Wait();
                    Thread.Sleep(1000);
               } 
           });
}


public static Task Consumer() <----- How is a Task object returned?
{
    return Task.Run(() => 
           {
                while (true)
                {
                     Int32 n = m_buffer.ReceiveAsync<Int32>().Wait();
                     Console.WriteLine(n);
                }
           });
}

Of course the compiled result of your methods will be completely different from my examples, because compiler smart enough and it can generate code in such way, so some of the lines in your method will be invoked on the context (thread), which calls the method and some of them on the background context. And this is actually why Thread.Sleep(1000); is not recommended in the body of async methods, because this code can be invoked on the thread, which calls this method. Task has equivalent which can replace Thread.Sleep(1000); the equivalent await Task.Delay(1000), which will be invoked on background thread. As you can see await keyword guaranties you that this call will be invoked on the background context and will not block the caller context.

Let's take a look on one more example:

async Task Test1()
{
    int a = 0; // Will be called on the called thread.
    int b = await this.GetValueAsync(); // Will be called on background thread 
    int c = GetC(); // Method execution will come back to the called thread again on this line.
    int d = await this.GetValueAsync(); // Going again to background thread
}

So we can say that this will be generated code:

Task Test1()
{
    int a = 0; // Will be called on the called thread.
    vat syncContext = Task.GetCurrentSynchronizationContext(); // This will help us go back to called thread

    return Task.Run(() => 
      {
           // We already on background task, so we safe here to wait tasks
           var bTask = this.GetValueAsync();
           bTask.Wait();
           int b = bTask.Result;

           // syncContext helps us to invoke something on main thread
           // because 'int c = 1;' probably was expected to be called on 
           // the caller thread
           var cTask = Task.Run(() => return GetC(), syncContext); 
           cTask.Wait();
           int c = cTask.Result;

           // This one was with 'await' - calling without syncContext, 
           // not on the thread, which calls our method.
           var dTask = this.GetValueAsync();
           dTask.Wait();
           int d = dTask.Result;
      });
}

Again, this is not the same code which you will get from compiler, but it should just give you some idea how this works. If you really want to take a look on what will be in the produced library, use for example IlSpy to take a look on generated code.

Also I really recommend to read this article Best Practices in Asynchronous Programming

share|improve this answer
    
I think saying async methods are similar to using Task.Run() is not right, because it gives the wrong idea. Especially in the case of GUI applications, the behavior is very different. –  svick Apr 8 '13 at 17:50
    
This is why I have latest example to just show how this will work in case of GUI applications. Showing AsyncTaskMethodBuilder don't think that it will explain much. –  outcoldman Apr 8 '13 at 18:36

That's exactly what the async keyword means. It takes a method and (usually) converts it to a Task returning method. If the normal method would have the return type of void, the async method will have Task. If the return type would be some other T, the new return type will be Task<T>.

For example, to download an process some data synchronously, you could write something like:

Foo GetFoo()
{
    string s = DownloadFoo();
    Foo foo = ParseFoo(s);
    return foo;
}

The asynchronous version would then look like this:

Task<Foo> GetFoo()
{
    string s = await DownloadFoo();
    Foo foo = ParseFoo(s);
    return foo;
}

Notice that the return type changed from Foo to Task<Foo>, but you're still returning just Foo. And similarly with void-returning methods: since they don't have to contain a return statement, async Task (without any <T>) methods also don't.

The Task object is constructed by the compiler-generated code, so you don't have to do that.

share|improve this answer
    
The implicit Task returnning is really disturbing to me. –  smwikipedia Apr 9 '13 at 1:29
    
Why? The whole point of async is easier composing of asynchronous code. And for that, you need some sort of “async value”, which is exactly what Task is. –  svick Apr 9 '13 at 9:49

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