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I want to create my own Integer with struct.

Here is a simple example of a Integer which the return value is forced to between 0 and 255.

These are pseudocode and C# won't compile it.

struct MyInt{
    private int p;
    default property theInt{  
        set{
            p = value;
        }
        get{
            if(p > 255) return 255; else if( p < 0) return 0;
            return p;
        }
    }
}

My main goal is to use following code :

MyInt aaa = 300;            //Grater than 255
if(aaa == 255) aaa = -300;  //Less than 255
if(aaa == 0) a = 50;

Is this possible to do with any .NET language ? Of course I prefer C#

share|improve this question
    
Looks okay, although I don't quite get your examples... –  bash.d Apr 8 '13 at 9:07
    
Have you tried to modify your setter by adding it some conditions ? –  Luke Marlin Apr 8 '13 at 9:07
5  
You can achieve this, not by declaring a "default property", but by writing an implicit conversion between your struct and int. –  Rawling Apr 8 '13 at 9:07
1  
Lossy implicit conversions are generally a bad idea. –  CodesInChaos Apr 8 '13 at 9:11
    
I'd replace your custom type with System.Byte and a byte ClampToByte(int i) function. –  CodesInChaos Apr 8 '13 at 9:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As I said in my comment, you can use an implicit conversion between your structure and int:

internal struct MyInt
{
    private int p;

    public int BoundedInt
    {
        // As CodesInChaos points out, the setter is not required here.
        // You could even make the whole property private and jsut use
        // the conversions.
        get
        {
            if (p > 255) return 255;
            if (p < 0) return 0;
            return p;
        }
    }

    public static implicit operator int(MyInt myInt)
    {
        return myInt.BoundedInt;
    }

    public static implicit operator MyInt(int i)
    {
        return new MyInt { p = i };
    }
}

You need both the int-to-struct conversion for when you assign a value and the struct-to-int conversion for when you compare values.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for posting your comment as answer, this will be accepted if there is no better solution. –  Mahdi Apr 8 '13 at 9:14
1  
Why did you keep the setter of evil? –  CodesInChaos Apr 8 '13 at 9:15
    
@CodesInChaos Whoops, misread. Why is the setter evil? –  Rawling Apr 8 '13 at 9:21
    
1) It makes the struct mutable 2) setting and then getting doesn't return the original value –  CodesInChaos Apr 8 '13 at 9:42
1  
I'd clamp when creating the custom type, not accessing it. Fixes equality, improves performance,... –  CodesInChaos Apr 8 '13 at 9:44

You assign a value to a struct in your code. I don't know what language semantcics you use here but in C#, you can not do that (in VB.NET neither as much as I know).

What you can do it what you actually already defined in your code, so define a property and the logic inside its get and set methods.

Yes, there is an option as Rawling suggests to overwrite cast operator between your struct and integer, but please do not do that, it's very confusional and not clear from code what is going on there.

So stand on simple property logic.

public struct MyInt{
    private int p = default(int);
    public int theInt{  
        set{
            var v = value; 
            if(v > 255) 
               v  =255; 
            else if(v < 0)
               v = 0;
            p = v;
        }
        get{              
            return p;
        }
    }

}

And also please note, that in my example I inverted the logic, I put it into the set, as if you develope in a way you presented, at some point your p, will not have a value of the property theInt, which I would strongly encourage to avoid. If there is a field that holds a property value, it has to be always equal to the value caller will get from the property itself. If not, it creates a confusion, and in long run development: a mess.

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"If there is a field that holds a property value, it has to be always equal to the value caller will get from the property" - why? –  Rawling Apr 8 '13 at 9:15
    
@Rawling: I explained my point of view in answer. If I have a p that holds a value of the property, it has to have the same value (in the same point of time) as the value I get by calling myInt property. Disalignemnt of these values is a source of mess. –  Tigran Apr 8 '13 at 9:18
    
Fair enough, I thought you were expressing it as an absolute rule rather than ... well, what I agree is good practice to stop mess :) –  Rawling Apr 8 '13 at 9:23

You should use an implicit conversion operator, like this:

public static implicit operator MyInt(int value)
{
    return new MyInt(value);
}

This way, you can use MyInt a = 10; and the value of 10 is assigned in the constructor of a that takes the value as a parameter.

You should then proceed by overloading the other operators.

share|improve this answer

.NET does not provide anything like a "default property"1.

As @Rawling comments you can use implicit conversion operators to allow assignment.

But in the end you can never completely emulate the inbuilt types within compiler and .NET CLI, for instance basic operations on System.Int32 are single CLI op-codes and literals are held natively.


1 Except within COM interop, but COM in VB (V6 and before) showed why default properties are a bad idea: having to have two keywords (let and set) for assignment to control when the reference or the default property was assigned.

share|improve this answer
    
Default properties do exist in VB.NET but since they require an argument they don’t have the issue you mention. Furthermore, it’s important to realise that VB6’ default property language feature merely attempted to solve the same problem that implicit conversions solve so having both would be redundant anyway. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 8 '13 at 9:29

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