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From Herb Shutter's C++ coding standards it says to avoid Premature optimization and Premature pessimization. But I feel both is doing the same thing. So expecting some help to clarify these two concept with the different among them. If you come-up with some examples, It will be more benefit for others. Here is a good explanation about Premature optimization. But I couldn't find any for Premature pessimization

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By the way, Knut said this in 1974. Nowadays premature optimization mostly means do not compile release version prematurely. Because compiler would optimize the 99% of the code (including the optimizations made by the programmer). –  SChepurin Apr 8 '13 at 9:18
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@SChepurin It certainly doesn't. Premature optimization means to optimize parts of the code (by e.g. writing supposedly fast low-level code, possibly including bit-fiddling, inline-assembly etc.) without having firm evidence that it is actually performance critical. –  Michael Wild Apr 8 '13 at 9:33
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@SChepurin Well, the term "premature optimization" doesn't have anything to do with compiler settings. It's about manually optimizing the code. –  Michael Wild Apr 8 '13 at 9:51
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@SChepurin that being exactly my point. "manually optimizing" the code is what the term "premature optimization" refers to. not turning on some optimization flag in your compile settings. –  Michael Wild Apr 8 '13 at 9:59
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@SChepurin, I'd say that anyone that seriously believes they can comment about 99% of all cases of optimization occurring in programming today is misguided in the extreme. –  Shane MacLaughlin Apr 8 '13 at 10:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 14 down vote accepted

What he means by premature pessimisation, I think, is just the opposite of premature optimisation: a fundamental disregard of which data structures and algorithms to use.

Premature optimisation is often concerned with minute details of algorithms that can well be tweaked later and don’t need to be paid attention to at the beginning.

Premature pessimisation, by contrast, concerns the high-level design of code architecture: a fundamentally inefficient interface for your library for instance cannot be fixed later by optimising, since the public interface is pretty much cast in stone.

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There are both small and large scale choices to be made when programming.

Pessimisation is when write code in a way that "prevents the compiler from doing a good job". A typical example would be to not place functions in a place that allows them to be inlined, when the function is REALLY small and simple (a {s,g}etter for example). This can make the function take 10x the time it should take, and it's such a simple thing to "get right".

A pessimisation that I've found a few times on this site is to use "a /= 2;" when "a >>= 1" is equally suitable. If we know that a is not negative, then shift left and divide have the same effect, but even when the compiler is optimising the divide, it nearly always produces more code to cope with "it may be negative" situation - and that extra code can be a real performance hit in some cases.

Premature optimisation is when you unroll loops or otherwise make the code more complicated simply because you don't trust the compiler to do a good job - typically with no evidence that it won't do a good job.

Another example would be "not using std::vector", but your own expandable array because "vector is too slow", without even having tested the code using std::vector.

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I am probably "prematurely" pessimistic, but there are many people that hardly know how to code, thus, "premature optimization" is something that is even not considered by them. –  SChepurin Apr 8 '13 at 10:09
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I agree with the first paragraph but I think you lost it at the second. Replacing a /2 by a >> 1 is exactly the kind of premature optimisation that you should leave to a compiler. Write readable code. If you want do divide by two, do that. Don’t get all cryptic on me on less you can prove that this piece of code is performance-critical and the compiler will produce less optimal code. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 8 '13 at 14:45
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Have you looked at the difference between a / 2 and a >> 1? You'd be surprised. I agree, that if it's something done once in the beginning of main, then it will make no difference. But writing code that is longer just because some beginner can't read it is also a bad idea. If someone is a professional C/C++ programmer and don't understand a >> 1 is the same as a / 2 (for positive values at least), then they are probably not a very experienced programmer (in C at least). –  Mats Petersson Apr 8 '13 at 14:59

I'd tend to think that premature pessimization is simply the misinterpretation of performance requirements that leads to premature opimization. i.e. you incorrectly assume your code will not perform fast enough or use too many resources (pessimism) so you optimize where it is not necessary.

With the advent of more and many huge datasets, I tend to see to reverse more often, i.e. lack of sufficient pessimism leading to selection of algorithms that will not scale to meet user requirements. This is often coupled with the belief that compiler optimization is some kind of substitute for poor algorithm selection.

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