Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When i need to call a different function based on the type of the object, i use a virtual method. But what should i do, when i have two objects of unknown type? I have the code for every possible combination, but what is the best way to actually call it?

Example:

There is the abstract class Shape, which has descendants, such as Point, Line, Polygon and Circle. We need a function, that returns the shortest distance between the closest points of these shapes, such as this:

double shortestDistance(const Shape &first, const Shape &second);

There is no way to simplify this problem (at least not in my case) to avoid actually having to use different code for each combination.

My current solution is for Shape to have a pure virtual method that returns its actual type (as enum) and then using this value in two nested switch statements before typecasting the arguments and finally calling the appropriate function for the particular combination, like this:

switch (first.getType()) {
    case POINT:
        switch (second.getType()) {
            case POINT:
                return shortestDistancePointPoint((const Point &) first, (const Point &) second);
            case LINE:
                return shortestDistancePointLine((const Point &) first, (const Line &) second);
            ...
        }
    case LINE:
        switch (second.getType()) {
            ...
        }
    ...
}

It seems kind of clumsy and possibly inefficient though. So, is there any better way to do it?

share|improve this question
    
What are you trying to achieve? Without background information this is hard to understand. –  bash.d Apr 8 '13 at 10:07
6  
Check en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_dispatch. –  kennytm Apr 8 '13 at 10:08
1  
Are you finding the shortest distance between the centers of the shapes, or from the edges? If from the center, why not have all the shapes respond to a getCenterPoint() message. That would make it very easy to calculate the shortest distance without needing a huge case statement. If it is from the edges though, then the problem is indeed more complex. –  Dave Newman Apr 8 '13 at 10:11
    
Boost.Variant supports double dispatch –  Andy Prowl Apr 8 '13 at 10:11
1  
The basic trick is to have a function on your interface that says "performOperationWith(Shape other)". Then you have a function on the interface for each specific type of object (performOperationWith(Box other)). The first function calls just the second one on its argument, passing itself as the argument. The second object will get the actual type of the first and know its own actual type, so it can then call a global function to handle that combo. In short, what @KennyTM said. –  dascandy Apr 8 '13 at 10:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.