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I have seen multiple anwsers where it is advise to run GC.Collect(GC.MaxGeneration).
Since the method GC.Collect() will collect all the existing generations, is there any difference between the two?

Maybe if there is only two generations alive instead of three, the GC will collect two generations, and will not attempt to collect the third, and this will increase performance. But seriously, does this make sense?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

GC.Collect() uses GCCollectionMode.Default and so does the GC.Collect(GC.MaxGeneration)

So, there is not difference between then!


According to MSDN

GCCollectionMode enum

Default : The default setting for this enumeration, which is currently Forced.
Forced : Forces the garbage collection to occur immediately.
Optimized : Allows the garbage collector to determine whether the current time is optimal to reclaim objects.

Using Reflector :

[MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.InternalCall)]
private static void nativeCollectGeneration(int generation, int mode); 

public static void Collect()
{
  GC.nativeCollectGeneration(-1, 0);
}

public static void Collect(int generation)
{
  GC.Collect(generation, GCCollectionMode.Default);
}

P.S. : 0 and GCCollectionMode.Default are same.

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it does seem that the enum values used differ in various .NET framework versions... Which .NET framework version did you look at? –  Knaģis Apr 8 '13 at 10:48
    
2.0, 3.5, 4.0 ! –  PaRiMaL RaJ Apr 8 '13 at 10:56

The only difference will be that GC.Collect() will use GCCollectionMode.Optimized but GC.Collect(GC.MaxGeneration) will use GCCollectionMode.Default (at least in .NET Framework 4.5). There are overloads where you can specify the collection mode manually as well.

/// <summary>Specifies the behavior for a forced garbage collection.</summary>
public enum GCCollectionMode
{
    /// <summary>The default setting for this enumeration, which is currently <see cref="F:System.GCCollectionMode.Forced" />. </summary>
    Default,
    /// <summary>Forces the garbage collection to occur immediately.</summary>
    Forced,
    /// <summary>Allows the garbage collector to determine whether the current time is optimal to reclaim objects. </summary>
    Optimized
}
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Are you sure that they use different modes? I thought both of them use default+blocking. –  CodesInChaos Apr 8 '13 at 10:37
1  
GC.Collect() uses the default mode. You can check with ilspy/etc. Seems the only difference is _Collect(GC.MaxGeneration, 0) vs _Collection(-1, 0). –  Will Apr 8 '13 at 10:37
    
@CodesInChaos - yes, just looked at the source code in ILSpy. –  Knaģis Apr 8 '13 at 10:38
    
Well maybe you can link this too msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb495757.aspx –  V4Vendetta Apr 8 '13 at 10:38

GC.Collect() might do nothing as it uses 'Optimized' for GCCollectionMode

MSDN on Optimized-> Allows the garbage collector to determine whether the current time is optimal to reclaim objects.

GC.Collect(GC.MaxGeneration) uses 'Forced' for GCCollectionMode

MSDN on Forced -> Forces the garbage collection to occur immediately.

Both will try to reclaim for all generations.

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The behaviour of a standard (system-initiated) garbage collection is this:

  1. Remove all items from GenX that are not rooted (that is, referenced from active code)
  2. Promote all remaining items from GenX to GenX+1
  3. If there is not enough room in GenX+1 for the new items, repeat the above for GenX+1

So, a standard collection might only collect Gen0, and shuffle some data into Gen1, and then stop. This contributes to the long life of objects that reach Gen2: Gen2 is collected much less frequently than Gen0, and so an object that reaches Gen2 will likely hang around awhile.

If you force a collection for all generations, objects in Gen2 will be collected immediately. This will release more memory, but will also have a performance impact.

Most importantly, any collection will promote rooted items to the next generation. This is one reason that manual collections are bad: items will needlessly be promoted to Gen1/2 and will then actually hang around longer (unless you repeatedly use manual GC, which just compounds the problem...).

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It's worthwhile to note that an object in Gen1 or Gen2 which has not been written since the last Gen1 collection cannot contain any objects in Gen0 and can thus be totally ignored during a Gen0 collection. Likewise an object in Gen2 which has not been written since the last Gen2 collection cannot contain any objects in Gen0 or Gen1 and can be totally ignored during a Gen0 or Gen1 collection. The ability to exploit the fact that Gen1 and Gen2 objects which haven't been written needn't be examined is the biggest key to generational GC performance. –  supercat Apr 8 '13 at 22:44

here is the internal code for you of GC class

// Forces a collection of all generations from 0 through Generation.
//
public static void Collect(int generation) {
    Collect(generation, GCCollectionMode.Default);
    }

// Garbage Collect all generations.
//
[System.Security.SecuritySafeCritical]  // auto-generated
public static void Collect() {
    //-1 says to GC all generations.
    _Collect(-1, (int)GCCollectionMode.Default);
}

[System.Security.SecuritySafeCritical]  // auto-generated
public static void Collect(int generation, GCCollectionMode mode)
{
    if (generation<0)
    {
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("generation", Environment.GetResourceString("ArgumentOutOfRange_GenericPositive"));
    }
    if ((mode < GCCollectionMode.Default) || (mode > GCCollectionMode.Optimized))
    {
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException(Environment.GetResourceString("ArgumentOutOfRange_Enum"));
    }
    Contract.EndContractBlock();
    _Collect(generation, (int)mode);
}

Here you can see that both of you method call calls the Collect Method with two params. Collect(int genration,GCCollectionMode mode).

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