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I want to extend the std::string with some functionality, so I derive my String from it. In order to make code like String str = stdStr; work, I've tried to overload the assignment operator, but my code is not being called for some reason. How can I fix it?

#include <string>

class String
    :
        public std::string
{

    public:
        /*
        I do know that this constructor will solve the problem, but is it possible to use the operator?

        String ( const std::string& stdString )
        {

            ...

        }
        */

        String& operator= ( const std::string& stdString )
        {
            ...
            return *this;
        }

};

int main()
{

    std::string foo = "foo";
    String bar = foo;

    return 1;

}
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2  
Are you sure inheritance is the right way to extend? –  Casper Beyer Apr 8 '13 at 10:49
1  
I think extending string is a bad idea. It's impossible to tell what your new functionality is, but I can say with high confidence that inheritance is not the way to do it. –  duffymo Apr 8 '13 at 10:51
    
The worst thing is that you call it String –  UmNyobe Apr 8 '13 at 10:52
    
Extending the standard STL classes is generally considered a very bad idea. Naming that differs only in case is another thing that is considered such. –  DevSolar Apr 8 '13 at 10:53
    
@UmNyobe it's in my personal namespace. What's the problem? –  Kolyunya Apr 8 '13 at 10:54

7 Answers 7

up vote 9 down vote accepted
String bar = foo;

It's copy initialization (equivalently to

String bar(String(foo));

), not assignment. You should implement copy constructor for this works (or initialize variable by default and then assign foo to bar).

Anyway, it's bad idea to derive from standard C++ types, since these types has no virtual destructors. And composition is even better, than inheritance, in your example, you should use composition.

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Thank you for an answer. Is it a better idea to make an std::string a member of my String and thus extend it's functionality? –  Kolyunya Apr 8 '13 at 11:04
    
Yes, it is definitely better to make std::string a member of String. –  riv Apr 8 '13 at 11:22
1  
@Kolyunya: The fact that thre is no virtual dtor is a very weak argument. String are VALUES. They will never be allocated with new towards an std::string* and deleted as such. Properly used string-s and String-s will not suffer of any UB. String-s (as well as string, ar not OOP objects, so OOP rules must not apply here: instead VALUE arithmetic rules must apply) –  Emilio Garavaglia Apr 8 '13 at 11:51
    
@riv: Have you ever tried? Is your boss paying you wile wasting your time rewriting all the 112 std::string prototypes? –  Emilio Garavaglia Apr 8 '13 at 11:54
    
@EmilioGaravaglia rewriting all the 112 std::string prototypes the possible solution could be to make a getStdString() method in our String class and call those 112 functions on the member std string directly. –  Kolyunya Apr 8 '13 at 12:04

The line String bar = foo it not an assignment, it is actually an equivalent to String bar(foo). If you write

String bar;
bar = foo;

your assignment operator will be called, as expected.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, that's tricky! Thanks! –  Kolyunya Apr 8 '13 at 10:52
    
They're not really equivalent. One is direct, the other copy -initialization. –  Luchian Grigore Apr 8 '13 at 10:55
    
Sure, there are some subtle differences, as in stackoverflow.com/questions/1051379 - but in this case they don't apply. –  riv Apr 8 '13 at 11:20

The problem here is that your line

String bar = foo;

does not call the assignment operator, because you have no object to assign to (bar is not yet created); it calls a constructor. Indeed, it would call your commented-out constructor if it were available.

If you really want to use your operator, you have to write:

String bar;
bar = foo; // Now bar exists and you can assign to it

Incidentally, inheriting from std::string is not too good an idea because this class, as most other classes in the standard library, is not designed to be inherited from. Specifically, it lacks a virtual destructor, which would lead to trouble if you were using it polymorphically, such as:

std::string* str = new String();
delete str; // Oops; the wrong destructor will be called
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1  
Techically corred but... Can someone of the "don't derive" school affiliates tellmy for which f...ing reason one should use strings polymorphicaly? It's 30 year I'm programming and I've never seen a std::string* str = new String(); in my old life from any string derived-class users. –  Emilio Garavaglia Apr 8 '13 at 11:57
2  
@EmilioGaravaglia: It's a matter of "distance to possible error". Deriving from a class that doesn't have a virtual destructor isn't an error in itself, but having such a class is getting your client closer to an error, because now you have to document that peculiarity of behaviour. And we all know how likely that is to happen. (Both the writing and the reading.) For beginners, you tend to give generic advice, and this time it's "don't extend standard classes". –  DevSolar Apr 8 '13 at 12:48
    
@EmilioGaravaglia Adding to what DevSolar says, that line may be unlikely, but passing a String* to a function taking a std::string* is not. Passing references also takes you to polymorphic behaviour, though I admit that you wouldn't try to delete an object you received by reference. Of course, if you know the danger, you can take measures against it (for instance: enforce the use of String instead of std::string in your code), but the danger is still there. –  Gorpik Apr 8 '13 at 15:19
1  
@EmilioGaravaglia: There's a slight difference between a class sans virtual destructor and a class derived from such a class, don't you think? And don't give me this "it's obvious if you know your stuff" talk. After well over a decade in the trade, I learned not to assume too much about the competence level of the next guy (or how he will be using a particular class). It's been quite a few occassions where I myself was tossed into an environment where I didn't know the language all that well and really enjoyed a thoughtful comment left by a considerate coder. –  DevSolar Apr 9 '13 at 4:12
1  
@EmilioGaravaglia: Not interested in your flamebait, sorry. –  DevSolar Apr 9 '13 at 10:42

In your case, despte = present, new String object will be created, thus requiring

String ( const std::string& stdString )  

to be uncommented. Another option would be to do something like

String bar;  
bar = foo;  

but that doesn't sounds like a good idea.

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Doing this uses the copy constructor:

String foo("foo");
String foo="hello";//assignment operator here

But this does not:

String foo;
String foo="hello";//copy constructor used here since foo was not initialized
share|improve this answer

The other upvoted answers are well-informed.

In the interest of directly answering your question, you're trying to do this.

    String& operator= ( const std::string& stdString )
    {
        // Call the base implementation
        return std::string::operator= ( stdString );
    }
share|improve this answer

std::string foo = "foo"; String bar = foo;

The operation you are trying in main is not going to call copy assignment operator.It is equivalent of calling copy constructor.

Its better to avoid inheriting std::string as it doesn't define virtual destructor.

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