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this my code

#include <iostream>
#include <windows.h>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
    int x,y, size;
    int array[][2] = {{1,2}, {5,6}, {13, 16}, {17, 69}, {100, 200}};
    for(x=0; x<5; x++){
        for(y=0; y<2; y++){

            cout<<array[x][y];
        }
        cout<<" ";
    }
    system("pause>nul");
    return 0;
}

the code work fine. But, when I replace line no.7 int array[][2] to int array[][1], show error message like this :

64 E:\path\array_multi2.cpp:8 too many initializers for 'int [1]'

what the problem ?

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1 Answer 1

int array[][1] declares an array with only one element in its second dimension. You can't then initialize each of the elements in the first dimension with {1,2} or {5,6}, because that would require two elements.

You would, for example, be able to initialize it like so:

int array[][1] = {{1}, {2}, {3}};
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your reply, but how to know size of array[] and array[2] ? so, the looping code can be wrote like this : for(x=0; x<sizeofarray1; x++){ for(y=0; y<sizeofarray2; y++){ cout<<array[x][y]; } cout<<" "; } –  RieqyNS13 Apr 8 '13 at 11:49
    
@RieqyNS13 I don't understand your question. If you make it int array[][1], then your for loop should probably just look like this: for (x = 0; x < sizeofarray1; x++) { cout << array[x][0] << " "; }. There's no point looping over the second dimension if there's only one element in it –  Joseph Mansfield Apr 8 '13 at 11:52
    
if I replace line no.7 to int array[][3] = {{1,2, 3}, {5,6}, {13, 16}, {17, 69}, {100, 200}}; the code will show output : 151 2 3 5 6 0 13 16 0 17 69 0 100 200 0 the code should result output like this : 1 2 3 5 6 13 16 17 69 100 200 please help –  RieqyNS13 Apr 8 '13 at 12:10
    
@RieqyNS13 That's because your second dimension of the array has 3 elements. You are only initializing two of them with {5, 6} so the third element is set to 0. The same with {13, 16} and so on. Only in the first case did you actually initialize all three elements with {1, 2, 3}. –  Joseph Mansfield Apr 8 '13 at 12:14

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