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I have this same code on two places:

if (amountUnit.ToLower().Contains("x"))
{
    string[] amount = amountUnit.Split('x');
    x = amount[0].Trim();
    y = amount[1].Trim();
}
else
{
    x = "1";
    y = amountUnit.Trim();
}
//
unit = textInBrackets.Replace(amountUnit, "");
name = "";
for (int z = 0; z < i; z++)
{
    name += someArray[z];
    name += " ";
}
name = name.Trim();

The exact code is repeated twice. How to fix it? If i extract it in a new method, I'll have a lot of ref input parameters. Is there another way? If it's not possible, just the part untill the comments?

share|improve this question
    
which parameters you indicate in here? –  Cuong Le Apr 8 '13 at 11:45
3  
Looks like you should have two different methods - one for the x and y and another for the name. If you encapsulate x and y into a structure, you will have one ref parameter (or consider returning that struct and changing it in the caller). –  Oded Apr 8 '13 at 11:45
    
Maybe you can return a more complex struct or class containing all your return data? –  Elad Lachmi Apr 8 '13 at 11:46
    
What are your parameters? Why do you want them to be ref, I would avoid that. –  L-Three Apr 8 '13 at 11:47
    
@L-Three I don't want them to be ref. That's why I'm asking here, to avoid using ref. I need to return x and y from the method. –  petko_stankoski Apr 8 '13 at 11:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Like:

public struct Parameters
{
    public int X {get; set;}
    public int Y {get; set;}
}

public Parameters ExtractParameters(string amountUnit)
{    
    var parameters = new Parameters();
    if (amountUnit.ToLower().Contains("x"))
    {
        string[] amount = amountUnit.Split('x');
        parameters.X = int.Parse(amount[0].Trim());
        parameters.Y = int.Parse(amount[1].Trim());
    }
    else
    {
        parameters.X = 1;
        parameters.Y = int.Parse(amountUnit.Trim());
    }
    return parameters;
} 

Usage:

var parameters = ExtractParameters(amountUnit);
var x = parameters.X;
var y = parameters.Y; 

You can also make it an extension method on string. And of course you best add some exception handling too.

share|improve this answer

The code seems to have two, separate blocks, logically.

One that deals with x and y - the other with name. These should probably be separate methods.

Now, you can create a type (class or structure) that encapsulates x and y, meaning that you only need to pass in one parameter. Instead of passing it by ref you can simply return it and in the caller replace what you passed in.

share|improve this answer
    
You mean the input parameter will be amountUnit, ok. But how would I not use ref here? –  petko_stankoski Apr 8 '13 at 11:52
1  
@petko_stankoski - You return a new instance of it and use that in the caller. As you do with all string functions, for example. –  Oded Apr 8 '13 at 11:52

Combine your code and your data into a class ;-)

public class Point
{
    public Point(string amountUnit)
    {
        if (amountUnit == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("amountUnit");
        }

        if (amountUnit.ToLower().Contains("x"))
        {
            string[] amount = amountUnit.Split('x');
            this.X = amount[0].Trim();
            this.Y = amount[1].Trim();
        }
        else
        {
            this.X = "1";
            this.Y = amountUnit.Trim();
        }
    }

    string X { get; private set; }
    string Y { get; private set; }
}
share|improve this answer

If you don't need anything very dynamic, how about splitting it into two methods, and doing something as simple as this:

public static string GetX(string amountUnit)
{
    return amountUnit.ToLower().Contains("x") ? 
                        amountUnit.Split('x')[0].Trim() : 
                        "1";
}

public static string GetY(string amountUnit)
{
    return amountUnit.ToLower().Contains("x") ? 
                        amountUnit.Split('x')[1].Trim() :       
                        amountUnit.Trim();
}
share|improve this answer

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