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I'm wondering how to do the following in Python. If I have a function with a for loop, it is possible to with an if statement to skip certain numbers.

This is an implementation of fisher-yates d got from activestate.com.

import random

def shuffle(ary):
    a=len(ary)
    b=a-1
    for d in range(b,0,-1):
      e=random.randint(0,d)
      if e == d:
            continue
      ary[d],ary[e]=ary[e],ary[d]
    return ary

Now continue simply goes to the next value for d. How can I, instead of doing continue, rerun the function with the original parameter ary?

Note that the function is just some example code, I'm curious on how to do this in general. Also, maintaining a copy of the array might not be possible if the list is big, so thats not really a solution imo.

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The list is not edited in place... –  gioi Apr 8 '13 at 12:32
    
Do you want to continue in the original loop after you “restarted” the function? I.e. do you want to have recursion, or do you just want to abort the current function and start over? –  poke Apr 8 '13 at 12:33
    
@gioi I assume the list would be edited in place in the "do something to the list" part. –  poke Apr 8 '13 at 12:33
    
What exactly are you doing to the list in the else branch? Adding/removing elements? Which ones? –  unkulunkulu Apr 8 '13 at 12:35
    
I've found an example that is actually pretty close to the code I wrote. It's an implementation of the Fisher-Yates shuffle. I've updated the code in the start post. –  Mythio Apr 8 '13 at 12:50
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is a common recursive pattern. However, your case is a little different than usual because here you need to make a copy of your input list to use when you recurse if the shuffling fails.:

import random

def shuffle(ary):
    initial = ary[:]
    a=len(ary)
    b=a-1
    for d in range(b,0,-1):
      e=random.randint(0,d)
      if e == d:
            return shuffle(initial)
      ary[d],ary[e]=ary[e],ary[d]
    return ary


ary = [1,2,3,4,5,6]
print shuffle(ary)

Also note that Wikipedia gives a (non-recursive) python implementation of the very similar Sattolo's algorithm.

from random import randrange

def sattoloCycle(items):
    i = len(items)
    while i > 1:
        i = i - 1
        j = randrange(i)  # 0 <= j <= i-1
        items[j], items[i] = items[i], items[j]
    return

If I read the article correctly, to re-acquire Fisher-Yates, you'd just do one simple change:

from random import randrange

def FisherYates(items):
    i = len(items)
    while i > 1:
        i = i - 1
        j = randrange(i+1)  # 0 <= j <= i
        items[j], items[i] = items[i], items[j]
    return
share|improve this answer
    
No this doesnt work. If I make ary = [1,2,3,4,5,6] and replace the continue with return shuffle(ary) I get, among others the result [5, 3, 6, 4, 2, 1]. I don't think that should happen since the 4 remains in the same place, and if I understand the code correctly that should not be the case. –  Mythio Apr 8 '13 at 12:55
    
Note that the example code has changed to an implementation i just found, but the problem is the same. –  Mythio Apr 8 '13 at 12:56
    
From what I can see, the problem remains that with return shuffle(ary) you are rerunning shuffle() with an already modified ary. And thats not the behaviour I'm looking for. –  Mythio Apr 8 '13 at 13:00
    
@Mythio -- I didn't see your updated code until just a minute ago. See my update. –  mgilson Apr 8 '13 at 13:02
    
Thanks, I'll look at the Sattolo algorithm. The solution you provide however, means keeping a copy of the original array. I'd like to know if its possible to avoid that, for instance because of memory constraints. Is that possible? –  Mythio Apr 8 '13 at 13:21
show 2 more comments
def function(list):
    len(list)-1
    for i in range(len(list)-1,0,-1):
      e= randint(0,i)
      while e > i:
            e= randint(0,i)
      "do something to the list"
    return array

?

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def function(list):
    for i in (a for a in range(len(list)-1,0,-1) if randint(0,a) > a):
        #do something with list
    #do something else with remainder.

Not exactly what you asked for. Just wanted to remind you of this possibility.

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you can copy the parameter to a temp variable. then call the function with the temp variable and use return;

def function(list):
listCopy = list;
    len(list)-1
    for i in range(len(list)-1,0,-1):
      e= randint(0,i)
      if e > i:
            return function(listCopy)
      else
            "do something with the list"
    return array
share|improve this answer
    
If list will be changed in-place, listCopy will be changed as well. –  poke Apr 8 '13 at 12:35
    
BTW, what are those semicolons? –  gioi Apr 8 '13 at 12:36
    
@poke: exactly, you could use listCopy = list(list) to create a truly new list, but memory wise this is not a good idea. –  Mythio Apr 8 '13 at 12:58
    
@gioi, i am not good with phyton. –  gorkem Apr 8 '13 at 13:11
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