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I have this peace of code:

#include "Item.h"
#include "Object.h"

int main(){

    Item Pan(0);

    Pan.Prep2Cook();


    //Object(char*, int);

    Object Drawer(Pan.Oil_Memory, Pan.Oil_Size);


    Drawer.Search();

    Pan.OilId = Drawer.Oil();

    Pan.Finish_Cooking();


    return 0;
}

It works as expected but if I change it to this:

#include "Item.h"
#include "Object.h"

DWORD WINAPI Cooky(LPVOID);


int main(){

    // tried changing to 1000000000, still gives the error...
    // tried changing to 0, still gives the error...

    CreateThread(0,100000,Cooky,LPVOID(0),0,0);

    /*...
    Do_Other_Stuff();
    ...*/


    return 0;
}

DWORD WINAPI Cooky(LPVOID lParam)
{

    Item Pan(int (lParam) );

    Pan.Prep2Cook();

    Object Drawer(Pan.Oil_Memory, Pan.Oil_Size);//memory allocating error here

    Drawer.Search();

    Pan.OilId = Drawer.Oil();

    Pan.Finish_Cooking();

    return 0;

}

The problem occurs when allocating memory in the "Drawer" class like this:

data1 = new unsigned char[size];//error here

data2 = new unsigned char[size2];

all_data = new unsigned char*[9];

Edit: The size and size2 are equal to 10000 or less.

I tried to "maneuver" with the dwStackSize parameter in the Createthread, but it still gives me errors...

Any recommendations on how to solve this error are welcome.

share|improve this question
    
None of those are allocated on the stack, so changing the stack size of the thread won't help. –  chris Apr 8 '13 at 12:58
2  
what is 'size' set to? –  Salgar Apr 8 '13 at 12:58
    
The nice thing about threads is that you'll have a bunch more code allocating memory and doing work. The other side of that medal is that you'll inevitably run out of virtual memory quicker. Or increase the odds that you corrupt the heap because you don't adequately protect shared state. Threading is never something you can just add to code that wasn't designed to be thread-safe. –  Hans Passant Apr 8 '13 at 13:22

1 Answer 1

it is hard to tell with so little code what your error is but here are a few things you may want to consider

what your main thread is actually doing in

/*...
Do_Other_Stuff();
...*/

return 0; //this will immediatly end every single thread

matters, if you try to run the code as is your main thread will end and exit your program if your program seems to crash when you fail to allocate the memory, it may be because it is a significant operation in your thread and your program exits while you try to allocate memory

secondly, the stack size you allocate to your thread is irrelevant since the allocation wich fails is on the heap (since you use new) further more, allocating to much stack could hinder the allocation since you have only finite memory (but that is probably not the issue )

share|improve this answer
    
well, i wrote do_other_stuff() for a reason, haven't I made it clear enough? (maybe I shouldn't have commented it...). I also tried to run with the 0 dwStacksize value, the results were the same... –  user1494517 Apr 8 '13 at 15:11

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