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I am migrating my code from vs 6.0 to vs 2012 The code compiles and run in vs 6.0 but.... in vs 2012 it crushes.

In my code i define some typedefs a vector of my class and an iterator

typedef vector<MyClass> CLS_VECTOR;
typedef CLS_VECTOR::iterator clsVecIndex;

now in the code I am using it as followed:

EDIT:
    #include "myClass.h"

    CLS_VECTOR myVec;
    clsVecIndex index;

    //the vector is filled and i can see it in the memory view

    for(index = myVec.begin(); index != myVec.end(); ++index)
    {
       //dosomething
    }

My problem is that the assignment of index does not succeed and it has the address of 0xccccccc and then the code of course crushes (try to compare with 0xccccccc - access violation) (in vs 6.0 the assignment succeed and the //dosomthing is done) .

Can anyone help understand what is wrong? Why it works on vs 6.0 and on vs 2012 it crushes? I feel it is something so obvious that for some reason I cant see it....

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1  
Can't see any problem in this code. It seems, that the problem is in some other place –  borisbn Apr 8 '13 at 13:29
1  
is "#include myClass" a typo because of copy and paste? –  taocp Apr 8 '13 at 13:29
5  
It sounds like you have an undefined behaviour of some sort. Could you come up with the shortest complete example that has this behaviour, and post that? –  NPE Apr 8 '13 at 13:29
1  
You can't run a loop at namespace scope, so the above is obviously not the code causing problems. Show the real code, after reducing it to the bare minimum necessary to demonstrate the problem. Just for the record: VC6 predates the old C++ standard and there are lots of quirks in that compiler that newer C++ compilers will rightfully complain about. It will also provide new features, like getting the for-loop scope right, so you can write for(iterator it=c.begin(), end=c.end(); it!=end; ++it) without leaking the iterators to the enclosing range. –  Ulrich Eckhardt Apr 8 '13 at 21:13
1  
and, please, don't use the name index for iterators. you access elements through indices as in myVec[someIndex] and through iterators as in *someIt. –  TemplateRex Apr 13 '13 at 11:42

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