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I am getting recarray from matplotlib.mlab.csv2rec function. My expectation was it would have 2 dimensions like 'x', but it has 1 dimension like 'y'. Is there any way to get x from y?

>>> import numpy as np
>>> from datetime import date
>>> x=np.array([(date(2000,1,1),0,1),
...              (date(2000,1,1),1,1),
...              (date(2000,1,1),1,0),
...              (date(2000,1,1),0,0),
...              ])
>>> x
array([[2000-01-01, 0, 1],
       [2000-01-01, 1, 1],
       [2000-01-01, 1, 0],
       [2000-01-01, 0, 0]], dtype=object)
>>> y = np.rec.fromrecords( x )
>>> y
rec.array([(datetime.date(2000, 1, 1), 0, 1),
       (datetime.date(2000, 1, 1), 1, 1),
       (datetime.date(2000, 1, 1), 1, 0), (datetime.date(2000, 1, 1), 0, 0)],
      dtype=[('f0', '|O4'), ('f1', '<i4'), ('f2', '<i4')])
>>> x.ndim
2
>>> y.ndim
1
>>> x.shape
(4, 3)
>>> y.ndim
1
>>> y.shape
(4,)
>>>
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If your csv file has two columns, csv2rec should create an array with two dimensions. Can you provide an example of the file you are parsing, and the call to csv2rec that you make? moreover, notice that you can use the new numpy.genfromtxt instead of csv2rec: it works better but you must pass it dtype=None as a parameter. –  dalloliogm Oct 19 '09 at 15:06
    
actually it has 7 columns, first one is date in a format dd/mm/yyyy, then 6 doubles, can different types be the cause? –  maplpro Oct 19 '09 at 21:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Well, there might be a more efficient way than this, but here is one way:

#!/usr/bin/env python
import numpy as np
from datetime import date
x=np.array([(date(2000,1,1),0,1),
              (date(2000,1,1),1,1),
              (date(2000,1,1),1,0),
              (date(2000,1,1),0,0),
              ])

y=np.rec.fromrecords( x )

z=np.empty((len(y),len(y.dtype)),dtype='object')
for idx,field in enumerate(y.dtype.names):
   z[:,idx]=y[field]
assert (x==z).all()
share|improve this answer
    
sure, but I can't believe there is no elegant way for such conversion :( –  maplpro Oct 19 '09 at 21:47

You can do it via pandas:

import pandas as pd
pd.DataFrame(y).values

array([[2000-01-01, 0, 1],
       [2000-01-01, 1, 1],
       [2000-01-01, 1, 0],
       [2000-01-01, 0, 0]], dtype=object)

But I would consider doing my project in pandas if I were you. Support for named columns is built much more deeply into pandas than into regular numpy.

>>> z = pd.DataFrame.from_records(y, index="f0")
>>> z
            f1  f2
f0                
2000-01-01   0   1
2000-01-01   1   1
2000-01-01   1   0
2000-01-01   0   0
>>> z["f1"]
f0
2000-01-01    0
2000-01-01    1
2000-01-01    1
2000-01-01    0
Name: f1
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for pandas, which ought to make all of this easier, but I believe the proper way to access a DataFrame as a numpy array is .values, not .__array__(). –  Dan Allan Oct 10 '13 at 15:16
    
Changed __array__() to values; thanks, @DanAllan –  kuzzooroo Oct 10 '13 at 18:25

Sounds weird but... I can save to csv by using matplotlib.mlab.rec2csv, and then read to ndarray by using numpy.loadtxt. My case is simpler as I already have csv file. Here is an example how it works.

>>> a = np.loadtxt( 'name.csv', skiprows=1, delimiter=',', converters = {0: lambda x: 0} )
>>> a
array([[ 0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ],
       [ 0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ],
       [ 0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ],
       [ 0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ],
       [ 0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ],
       [ 0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ],
       [ 0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ],
       [ 0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ],
       [ 0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ],
       [ 0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ],
       [ 0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ],
       [ 0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ],
       [ 0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ],
       [ 0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ],
       [ 0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ],
       [ 0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ,  0.  ],
       [ 0.  ,  0.29,  0.29,  0.43,  0.29,  0.  ],
       [ 0.  ,  0.71,  0.29,  0.57,  0.  ,  0.  ],
       [ 0.  ,  1.  ,  0.57,  0.71,  0.  ,  0.  ],
       [ 0.  ,  0.43,  0.29,  0.14,  0.14,  0.  ],
       [ 0.  ,  1.  ,  0.43,  0.71,  0.  ,  0.  ],
       [ 0.  ,  0.57,  0.57,  0.29,  0.14,  0.  ],
       [ 0.  ,  1.43,  0.43,  0.86,  0.43,  0.  ],
       [ 0.  ,  1.  ,  0.71,  0.57,  0.  ,  0.  ],
       [ 0.  ,  1.14,  0.57,  0.29,  0.  ,  0.  ],
       [ 0.  ,  1.43,  0.29,  0.71,  0.29,  0.29],
       [ 0.  ,  1.14,  0.43,  1.  ,  0.29,  0.29],
       [ 0.  ,  0.43,  1.14,  0.86,  0.43,  0.14],
       [ 0.  ,  1.14,  0.86,  0.86,  0.29,  0.29]])
>>> t = a.any( axis = 1 )
>>> t
array([False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False, False,
       False, False, False, False, False, False, False,  True,  True,
        True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,  True,
        True,  True], dtype=bool)
>>> a.ndim
2

Also in my case I don't need a first column for making a decision.

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