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I'd like to unit test fun1 without calling fun2.

let fun2() =
    // Some complex function with lots of dependencies.
    1

let fun1() =
    fun2() * 2

What the best way to break the dependency between the two functions?

I’ve tried a couple of different ways, but they just add clutter.

Pass fun2 into fun1

let fun1(fun2) =
    fun2() * 2

Convert to a class and override

type FunClass() =
    abstract member fun2 : unit -> int
    default x.fun2() = 1

    member x.fun1() =
        x.fun2() * 2

type FunClassMock() =
    override member x.fun2() = 1

Use stategy pattern

type Fun1Class(fun2Class) =

    member x.fun1() =
       fun2Class.fun2() * 2

Use a variable

let fun2Imp() =
    1

let mutable fun2 = fun2Imp

let fun1() =
    fun2() * 2

Is there a cleaner way?

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Global variables are always the best solution –  nicolas Apr 8 '13 at 15:19
1  
I do not want to imply that there is anything wrong with your question - it is perfectly valid - but I was just wondering why do you want to do this? What is the real-world scenario behind it? (I think that might help to find the right answer...) –  Tomas Petricek Apr 8 '13 at 17:32
    
I’ve see this issue in a number of real world scenarios. The main one is financial calculations. So x = a + b/c, where a b and c are the results of complex calculations. In most cases I’ve created classes (aCalculator(), bCalculator()) and passed them to my xCalculator(), strategy pattern style, but that just doesn’t seem that functional and I wondered if I was missing a better way. –  Keith Harrison Apr 9 '13 at 13:35
    
One of the main motivators for asking this question is it seems to me that unit testing in F# is actually harder than in C# (or in dynamic languages like python) because there’s no way to break dependencies without adding some ugly plumbing code or falling back to OO techniques. I’m a big fan of F# and find it usual has better solutions to most problems than C# but this is one area I can’t even find an equivalent solution to C#. I feel I must be missing something. –  Keith Harrison Apr 9 '13 at 13:49
    
@KeithHarrison Does the answer I gave not do that? And more simply than an OO way of doing it. Maybe it would be helpful if you posted what you think the OO way of doing it would be. –  mydogisbox Apr 9 '13 at 14:02

4 Answers 4

It depends on your usage, but you could do something like this:

let fun2() =
    // Some complex function with lots of dependencies.
    1

let createFun1 fun2 =
    fun () -> fun2() * 2

let fun1 = createFun1 fun2

This is also useful for unit testing since you can test fun1 by simply passing a simple function in for fun2.

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It isn't very flexible, but a compiler directive would work.

let fun2() =
  #if TESTING
  1
  #else
  // Some complex function with lots of dependencies.
  #endif

Defining fun2 in separate modules and opening the needed module is another option.

module Impl =
  let fun2() =
    // Some complex function with lots of dependencies.

module Testing =
  let fun2() = 1
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Any way you do it (that I know of, at least) is going to "add clutter". How about something like this?

let fun1() = 
    fun1_impl(fun2)

let fun1_impl(fun2) =
    fun2() * 2

Then, in regular code, use fun1, and in your tests, use fun1_impl.

share|improve this answer

In all generality, the argument passing seems the cleanest.

The clutter effect might not be tackled technically, but semantically : it comes from the fact that it seems a bit arbitrary, from the lack of meaning attached to "function1".

Is there may be a higher, more coherent, level that might be more meaningful in your code ?

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