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I think the best way to ask this question is with some code:

//Main method
for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
    dispatch_async(dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT, 0), ^{
         [self foo:i];
    });

}

- (void) foo: (int) i
{
    @synchronized(self)
    {
        NSLog(@"%d",i);
    }
}

In this case, is it guaranteed that the numbers 0-9 will be printed out in order? Is there ever a chance that one of the threads that is waiting on the run queue, will be skipped over? How about in reality. Realistically, does that ever happen? What if I wanted the behavior above (still using threads); how could I accomplish this?

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Threads and GCD blocks don't get "skipped". If a thread throws an exception, you'll never know without an explicit try-catch because GCD forgoes exception handling. –  CodaFi Apr 8 '13 at 15:54
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2 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

In this case, is it guaranteed that the numbers 0-9 will be printed out in order?

No.

Is there ever a chance that one of the threads that is waiting on the run queue, will be skipped over?

Unclear what "skipped over" means. If it means "will the blocks be executed in order?" the answer is "probably, but it is an implementation detail".

How about in reality. Realistically, does that ever happen?

Irrelevant. If you you are writing concurrency code based on assumptions about realistic implementation details, you are writing incorrect concurrency code.

What if I wanted the behavior above (still using threads); how could I accomplish this?

Create a serial dispatch queue and dispatch to that queue in the order you need things to be executed. Note that this is significantly faster than @synchronized() (of course, @synchronized() wouldn't work for you anyway in that it doesn't guarantee order, but merely exclusivity).

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Can you please explain, why not? From Apple docs: "Concurrent queues (also known as a type of global dispatch queue) execute one or more tasks concurrently, but tasks are still started in the order in which they were added to the queue." Doesn't this mean, that the order will be met? –  Dmitry Zhukov Apr 8 '13 at 15:57
7  
They will be started in the order they are added, but the thread scheduling may mean they do not complete execution in that same order. –  Mike Weller Apr 8 '13 at 15:59
    
got it, thanks! –  Dmitry Zhukov Apr 8 '13 at 16:00
2  
For example, "starting a task" may involve spinning up a new thread whereas the next "starting a task" may recycle a thread that just became available while the first was spinning up. Combine that with any of the unpredictable behaviors incurred by locking in various subsystems (malloc, for example), and it is best to never assume anything about execution order. –  bbum Apr 8 '13 at 16:18
    
To contribute to this awesome answer I would like to point out that in addition you can use dispatch_barrier_async() to post operations on a concurrent queue you created yourself (not one of the global queues) to post blocks that would execute only after all previously dispatched blocks have finished. –  svena Apr 9 '13 at 6:56
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From the documentation of dispatch_get_global_queue

Blocks submitted to these global concurrent queues may be executed concurrently with respect to each other.

So that means there is no guaranteed of anything there. You are passing a block of code to the queue and the queue takes it from there.

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