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I am using c++ to read a file and get the key value by the key name. The point is that the key name might be repeated many times in this file. They are structured in the following format.

Data file format

Please keep in mind, that right now I don't have much control on the original code, that is how this data file is formatted.

dictName
{
    keyA 9;
    keyB 3;
    keyC 5;

    subDictName
    {
        keyD 0.57;
        keyE 5.23;
    }
}

anotherDictName
{
    keyG 6;
    keyC 1;

    subDictName
    {
        keyF 0.17;
        keyE 2.21;
    }
}

I wrote the following code, but I found it is not clean enough, anyone knows a better solution to handle the bracket matching in C++?

The code I wrote

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>
#include <sstream>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    ifstream inf(fileName);
    istream_iterator<string> first(inf), last;
    vector<string> lines(first, last);

    for (unsigned i = 0; i < lines.size(); ++i)
    {
        if (size_t pos1 = lines[i].find(dictName) != string::npos)
        {
            size_t len1 = string(dictName).length();
            if (!isalnum(lines[i][pos1+len1+1]))
            {
                unsigned lineSta = 0;
                unsigned lineEnd = 0;
                for (unsigned j = i+1; j < lines.size(); ++j)
                {
                    if (lines[j].find("{") != string::npos)
                    {
                        lineSta = j+1;
                        break;
                    }
                }
                for (unsigned k = lineSta+1; k < lines.size(); ++k)
                {
                    if (lines[k].find("}") != string::npos)
                    {
                        lineEnd = k-1;
                        break;
                    }
                }
                for (unsigned l = lineSta; l <= lineEnd; ++l)
                {
                    if (size_t pos2 = lines[l].find(keyName) != string::npos)
                    {
                        size_t len2 = string(keyName).length();
                        if (!isalnum(lines[l][pos2+len2+1]))
                        {
                            outputStr = split(lines[l+1], ';')[0];
                            cout<< "outputStr = " << outputStr << endl;
                            break;
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
You can strip all brackets and semicolons, and use a YAML loader :P –  Joe Frambach Apr 8 '13 at 15:59
6  
I'm curious, why don't you use an existing file format like JSON or YAML? No need to reinvent the wheel. –  John Kugelman Apr 8 '13 at 16:00
3  
@Daniel it means that there already exists parser who understand structures defined by matching braces. Like JSON and YAML parsers. You should look at using such already done parsers. They would save a lot of your time. –  Stephane Rolland Apr 8 '13 at 16:03
1  
The simplest solution would be to use lex and yacc: tokenize, then define the grammar. –  James Kanze Apr 8 '13 at 16:30
1  
Then use a standard format like XML/JSON/etc. I've written enough interpretors over time to know that it isn't worth it. –  Michael Dorgan Apr 8 '13 at 16:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I couldn't help but notice that this is the very same format as supported by the INFO parser in Boost::property_tree, except for the semicolon-terminated values. It should be next to trivial to wrap that in a way that strips the semicolon from the key value; much easier and less error-prone than writing input / output and handling functions yourself, at any rate.

share|improve this answer
    
Haha, thanks! I think this is a clean solution to me. After a try, it seems now that they can handle semicolon automatically. But I am wondering how to define a user-defined parser in boost. The trick is I have a lot of commenting lines in my data file. –  Daniel Apr 9 '13 at 15:02
    
@Daniel: Comments beginning with ; are supported by the INFO parser. If your data files have a different format, note that the read / write operations work on streams, not necessarily files - and a stream filter shouldn't be hard to do. –  DevSolar Apr 9 '13 at 16:40
    
Hmm, the key word format is now a problem. Please see my question. stackoverflow.com/questions/15906691/… –  Daniel Apr 9 '13 at 16:44

Since this is an existing format, I would start by looking for an existing program or library that reads it. Otherwise the traditional solution would be to use Bison and Flex. I am sure that Boost and other modern tools can be used too, but I'm more familiar with Bison and Flex.

To show the principle, here is a minimal solution using Bison and Flex that can parse your example input file. I may have misunderstood the format of your input, so use with caution.

First the Bison file, which specifies the grammar for the input:

%{
#include <iostream>
extern int yylex();
extern void yyerror(char* message);
%}

%token ID INT FLOAT

%%

dicts : dicts dict | /* empty */ ;
dict : ID '{' keys subdict '}' { std::cout << "Done a dict.\n"; } ;
keys : keys key | /* empty */ ;
key : ID INT ';' { std::cout << "Done a key.\n"; };
subdict : ID '{' subkeys '}' { std::cout << "Done a subdict.\n"; } ;
subkeys : subkeys subkey | /* empty */ ;
subkey : ID FLOAT ';' { std::cout << "Done a subkey.\n"; };

%%

void yyerror(char* message) {
    std::cout << "Error: " << message << "\n";
}

int main() {
    std::cout << "Staring parser...\n";
    yyparse();
    std::cout << "Parser done.\n";
    return 0;
}

And then a Flex file, which defines the format of the individual tokens in the input:

%{
#include "parser.tab.h"
%}

%%

[ \t\n]         { }
[0-9]+\.[0-9]+  { return FLOAT; }
[0-9]+          { return INT; }
[A-Za-z]+       { return ID; }
";"             { return ';'; }
"{"             { return '{'; }
"}"             { return '}'; }

%%

I get this output for your input file:

Staring parser...
Done a key.
Done a key.
Done a key.
Done a subkey.
Done a subkey.
Done a subdict.
Done a dict.
Done a key.
Done a key.
Done a subkey.
Done a subkey.
Done a subdict.
Done a dict.
Parser done.
share|improve this answer

you should probably look into recursive alogorithms

here is a wiki link which may help Recursive descent parser

it is more complex to implement then your method but much more clean and powerfull

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