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I have use a dict to store the condition, the number of keys and value in not fixed, such as

dict = {}
dict['v1'] = 'abc'
dict['v2'] = 123
...
dict['vn'] = xxx

My sql format is

select * from tablename where v1 = 'abc' and v2 = 123 and ... vn = xxx

I have tried to turn the sql like this first:

sql = "select * from tablename where v1 = %s and v2 = %s and ... vn = %s"

The format below can avoid sql injection, the question is that I dont know the number of values, how to write this prepared statements. Thanks in advance.

cursor.execute(sql, dict[v1], dict[v2], ..., dict[vn])

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The following should work:

sql = 'select * from tablename where ' + ' and '.join(k + ' = %s' for k in data)
cursor.execute(sql, tuple(data.values()))

Make sure you don't make any modifications to the dict between creating the sql string and executing the statement, since the ordering could change if you do.

Note that I renamed your dict to data, you shouldn't use dict as a variable name because it will mask the built-in type.

I'm not completely sure if the conversion to a tuple is necessary.

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It works, thx, :) –  alexqinbj Apr 9 '13 at 1:37
    
watch out for the ordering in data.values() - it may look sorted but there are no guarantees –  petr Apr 9 '13 at 13:53

I would use something like following to paramerise the execute function:

def print_test(sql, param1, param2, param3, param4, param5):
    # just output some of the parameters..
    print param2, param3

print_test("whatever", *(i for i in range(5)))

Above is a simple example to illustrate what is happening in the print_test function. I am assuming that you would like some kind of sorting, therefore an OrderedDict would be a good fit for you. Then, you can simply export the values and the order will be consistent. Cast them as a tuple and the execute function will unroll what it needs.

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Perhaps overkill, but you could use the excellent SqlAlchemy library:

from sqlalchemy.sql import select
from sqlalchemy import create_engine, MetaData, Table
engine = create_engine('mysql://your_connection_string')
meta = MetaData()
table = Table('table_name', meta, autoload=True, autoload_with=engine)
s = select([table])
for key, val in dict.items():
   s = s.where(getattr(table.c, key)==val)
for row in conn.execute(s):
    print row

It may be worth it if you plan on doing a lot of SQL in your Python.

http://docs.sqlalchemy.org/en/latest/core/tutorial.html

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