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I'm writing an html page that needs to create a websocket to the server

On the server, I used the example in "code.google.com/p/go.net/websocket" just accept the connection.

However, in Chrome26 the response is

WebSocket connection to 'ws://127.0.0.1:1234/' failed: Unexpected response code: 400

Is there something is missed (like a handshake)?

This is my html and server is using go

<html>
<head></head>
<body>
<script type="text/javascript">
    var sock = null;
    var wsuri = "ws://127.0.0.1:1234";

    window.onload = function() {

        console.log("onload");

        sock = new WebSocket(wsuri);

        sock.onopen = function() {
            console.log("connected to " + wsuri);
        }

        sock.onclose = function(e) {
            console.log("connection closed (" + e.code + ")");
        }

        sock.onmessage = function(e) {
            console.log("message received: " + e.data);
        }
    };

    function send() {
        var msg = document.getElementById('message').value;
        sock.send(msg);
    };
</script>
<h1>WebSocket Echo Test</h1>
<form>
    <p>
        Message: <input id="message" type="text" value="Hello, world!">
    </p>
</form>
<button onclick="send();">Send Message</button>
</body>
</html>

//------------------------------

package main

import (
    "code.google.com/p/go.net/websocket"
    "fmt"
    "log"
    "net/http"
)

func Echo(ws *websocket.Conn) {
    var err error

    for {
        var reply string

        if err = websocket.Message.Receive(ws, &reply); err != nil {
            fmt.Println("Can't receive")
            break
        }

        fmt.Println("Received back from client: " + reply)

        msg := "Received:  " + reply
        fmt.Println("Sending to client: " + msg)

        if err = websocket.Message.Send(ws, msg); err != nil {
            fmt.Println("Can't send")
            break
        }
    }
}

func main() {
    http.Handle("/", websocket.Handler(Echo))
    if err := http.ListenAndServe(":1234", nil); err != nil {
        log.Fatal("ListenAndServe:", err)
    }
}
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Chrome is likely throwing error 400 because it thinks you are trying to do a cross-domain request to the websocket server and thinks it is unlikely you have permission.

To solve the issue you simply have to server your html from your go-server too.

So change your sock.go code to:

package main

import (
    "code.google.com/p/go.net/websocket"
    "fmt"
    "log"
    "net/http"
)

func Echo(ws *websocket.Conn) {
    var err error

    for {
        var reply string

        if err = websocket.Message.Receive(ws, &reply); err != nil {
            fmt.Println("Can't receive")
            break
        }

        fmt.Println("Received back from client: " + reply)

        msg := "Received:  " + reply
        fmt.Println("Sending to client: " + msg)

        if err = websocket.Message.Send(ws, msg); err != nil {
            fmt.Println("Can't send")
            break
        }
    }
}

func main() {
    http.Handle("/", http.FileServer(http.Dir("."))) // <-- note this line
    http.Handle("/socket", websocket.Handler(Echo))
    log.Println("serving")
    if err := http.ListenAndServe(":1234", nil); err != nil {
        log.Fatal("ListenAndServe:", err)
    }
}

and add your index.html file to the same directory as your sock.go file:

<html>
<head></head>
<body>
<script type="text/javascript">
    var sock = null;
    var wsuri = "ws://127.0.0.1:1234/socket"; // <-- note new path

    window.onload = function() {

        console.log("onload");

        sock = new WebSocket(wsuri);

        sock.onopen = function() {
            console.log("connected to " + wsuri);
        }

        sock.onclose = function(e) {
            console.log("connection closed (" + e.code + ")");
        }

        sock.onmessage = function(e) {
            console.log("message received: " + e.data);
        }
    };

    function send() {
        var msg = document.getElementById('message').value;
        sock.send(msg);
    };
</script>
<h1>WebSocket Echo Test</h1>
<form>
    <p>
        Message: <input id="message" type="text" value="Hello, world!">
    </p>
</form>
<button onclick="send();">Send Message</button>
</body>
</html>

Now you will be able to connect from within chrome.

share|improve this answer
    
but i do not want to deal the protocol by myself did not the golang has deal this? –  user2258460 Apr 9 '13 at 7:48
    
This is not 'dealing the protocol' per-ce, more dealing with the browser. I've updated your code for you to add a filehandler. You will not be able to connect if you load your file from the filesystem you must load the file over http prefereably from the same origin. –  Chris Farmiloe Apr 9 '13 at 11:32
    
Actually I had test other language to make the server like java netty,c# they all support to accept the html create the websocket that no in server ,it just a html anyever , i think there is a tab in the protocol like "original" was miss becasue the html was local ,and the golang websocket just refuse this –  user2258460 Apr 10 '13 at 4:08
    
i found somebody deal the protocol by himself make this possible github.com/garyburd/go-websocket/tree/master/websocket –  user2258460 Apr 10 '13 at 8:22
    
I would like to add that the Go webserver does not accept sockets that do not have a origin in their request. Opening a html file from explorer with some JS will result in the webserver returning a unexpected result: 403 –  Rohan Oct 20 '13 at 9:35
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