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I'd like to take a subset of data based in a SQL Server database, so I can run some smoke tests for an application. My typical workflow is the following but the delete queries take more than an hour because there are hundreds of millions of rows in X, Y and Z. How can I make this go quicker? Please use T-SQL code in your answer for clarity.

  • backup each table by running this command for each:

    SELECT * INTO BACKUP_SRC_PATIENT FROM [SRC_PATIENT] -- has PK patient_id
    SELECT * INTO BACKUP_SRC_X FROM [SRC_X] -- has FK patient_id
    SELECT * INTO BACKUP_SRC_Y FROM [SRC_Y] -- has FK patient_id
    SELECT * INTO BACKUP_SRC_Z FROM [SRC_Z] -- has FK patient_id
    
  • delete all but 100 patients

    DELETE FROM [SRC_PATIENT] 
    WHERE [PATIENT_ID_NONNUM] NOT IN 
          (SELECT top 100 [PATIENT_ID] FROM [SRC_PATIENT]
           WHERE BLA = 'BLA')
    
  • delete data from SRC_X, SRC_Y and SRC_Z where patient_id not in SRC_PATIENT

    DELETE FROM [SRC_X] 
    WHERE [PATIENT_ID] NOT IN 
          (SELECT [PATIENT_ID] FROM [SRC_PATIENT])
    
    DELETE FROM [SRC_Y] 
    WHERE [PATIENT_ID] NOT IN 
          (SELECT [PATIENT_ID] FROM [SRC_PATIENT])
    
    DELETE FROM [SRC_Z] 
    WHERE [PATIENT_ID] NOT IN 
          (SELECT [PATIENT_ID] FROM [SRC_PATIENT])
    
share|improve this question
    
I'm not. There are 100s of millions of rows before the delete commands are run. Not regression testing. That happens in our QA environment. We are just running unit tests in this database. But even before the unit tests with thousands of patients, I do this for some simple smoke tests with 100 patients. –  MacGyver Apr 8 '13 at 18:12
    
What indexes are on the tables? –  Melanie Apr 8 '13 at 18:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Instead of deleting all rows except for 100 - truncate the table and copy over 100 rows from the backup.

TRUNCATE clips all data from the table without having to remove them row by row (or page by page as the case may be):

TRUNCATE TABLE [SRC_PATIENT]
TRUNCATE TABLE [SRC_X]
TRUNCATE TABLE [SRC_Y]
TRUNCATE TABLE [SRC_Z]

INSERT INTO [SRC_PATIENT]
SELECT TOP 100 * FROM [BACKUP_SRC_PATIENT]
WHERE BLA = 'BLA' 

INSERT INTO [SRC_X]
SELECT * FROM [BACKUP_SRC_X]
WHERE [PATIENT_ID] IN (SELECT [PATIENT_ID] FROM [SRC_PATIENT])

INSERT INTO [SRC_Y]
SELECT * FROM [BACKUP_SRC_Y]
WHERE [PATIENT_ID] IN (SELECT [PATIENT_ID] FROM [SRC_PATIENT])

INSERT INTO [SRC_Z]
SELECT * FROM [BACKUP_SRC_Z]
WHERE [PATIENT_ID] IN (SELECT [PATIENT_ID] FROM [SRC_PATIENT])
share|improve this answer
    
Or hitting the transaction log. –  Blam Apr 8 '13 at 18:51
    
@Blam, yes or that. Or locking each row. As mentioned in the link above. –  PinnyM Apr 8 '13 at 19:05

Use a schema switch and then pull the rows you want into the non-backup table

You will need to create a table with the same meta-data, but the switch happens almost instantly.

CREATE TABLE dbo.Backup-Table1
(Col1 int
Col2 int)

ALTER TABLE dbo.Table1
SWITCH TO dbo.Backup-Table1

INSERT INTO dbo.Table1
SELECT TOP 100 *
FROM dbo.Backup-Table1
WHERE Condition = Met
share|improve this answer

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