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Good day! Please help, I use nested if triggered the click event in a nested element, the function is called and the external parent. How can I raise an event once for internal?

Html

<ul>
    <li><a href="#">Item</a></li>
    <li><a href="#">Item 2</a>
        <ul>
            <li><a href="#">Subitem 1</a></li>
            <li><a href="#">Subitem 2</a></li>
            <li><a href="#">Subitem 3</a></li>
        </ul>
    </li>
</ul>

Jquery

$("ul li").on("click", function(e){
    alert($("a", this).text());
});

Code http://jsfiddle.net/fSkLb/1/

share|improve this question

Instead of listening on li, you can listen to the a

$("ul li a").on("click", function(e){
    alert($(this).text());
    return false;
});

Also, return false here stops the propogation.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the cleanest way, and you don't need the return false. – Travis Apr 8 '13 at 18:17
    
You will need return false, else it will propagate. – Jashwant Apr 8 '13 at 18:20
    
I disagree. See jsfiddle.net/fSkLb/8 – Travis Apr 8 '13 at 18:21
    
Thanks guys, you helped me! – lifter Apr 8 '13 at 18:22
1  
@Jashwant Your example doesn't make a lot of sense. Karthikr said to use the a in the selector, and you're using a selector without an a to prove your point. It does show that the solution is brittle though – Juan Mendes Apr 8 '13 at 18:27

The easiest way is for you to prevent propagation of the event to the parent elements

http://jsfiddle.net/fSkLb/3/

$("ul li").on("click", function(e){    
    e.stopPropagation();
    alert($("a", this).text());
});

Some of the other answers say to use return false. I wouldn't suggests that unless you're trying to prevent the link from being followed. e.stopPropagation is the way with the least amount of side effects.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks guys, you helped me! – lifter Apr 8 '13 at 18:21
    
So what you are saying that he would want to go to '#' ? return false is more right than e.stopPropagation() here. – Jashwant Apr 8 '13 at 18:27
    
@Jashwant Because in the real world, they would usually have a link so it can work without JS? – Juan Mendes Apr 8 '13 at 18:29

You need to prevents further propagation of the current event. so try this

$("ul li").on("click", function(e){
    alert($("a", this).text());
    e.stopPropagation()
});

JS Fiddle Example

share|improve this answer
2  
You're not calling stopPropagation on the jQuery event object (e). – jmar777 Apr 8 '13 at 18:18
    
thanks @jmar777 but i would like to know why event.stopPropagation() also working as you can see in fiddle – Sachin Apr 8 '13 at 18:21
    
what browser are you using? I know IE, for example, has a global window.event object that is always equal to the current event. Not sure about what other browsers have this as well. – jmar777 Apr 8 '13 at 18:22
    
I am using chrome and it'working only here not in IE or Firefox – Sachin Apr 8 '13 at 18:26

You can use the event's stopPropagation method, which will prevent the event from bubbling up the DOM tree:

$("ul li").on("click", function(e){
    e.stopPropagation();
    alert($("a", this).text());
});

Here's an updated jsfiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/fSkLb/5/

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks guys, you helped me! – lifter Apr 8 '13 at 18:21
$("ul li").on("click", function(e){
    alert($("a", this).text());
    return false;
});

return false avoids event bubble. The same can be done with stopPropagation.

share|improve this answer
2  
return false also stops the default behavior, not necessarily what is being asked – Juan Mendes Apr 8 '13 at 18:17
    
It may depend on the user's needs. What was asked is to avoid multiple events, not to keep the a basic event. – Korcholis Apr 8 '13 at 18:19
2  
e.stopPropagation answers the question without additional side effects – Juan Mendes Apr 8 '13 at 18:20
    
Well, you are right – Korcholis Apr 8 '13 at 18:26

I think I found the answer...

$("ul li").on("click", function(e){
    e.stopPropagation();
    alert($("a", this).text());
});
share|improve this answer
    
As the 4th person to suggestion stopPropagation(), I'd say you're right :) – jmar777 Apr 8 '13 at 18:19
    
you can either use e.stopPropagation() or return false; . – Jashwant Apr 8 '13 at 18:20
    
return false is the same as calling stopPropagation() and preventDefault(). In this case there's no default behavior, so no biggie, but in general it's best to be minimal in how you terminate event behavior. – jmar777 Apr 8 '13 at 18:21
    
@jmar777, right but why would the OP want to go to # – Jashwant Apr 8 '13 at 18:28
    
@Jashwant, It may be worth expanding on that in your answer, but the question is specifically about preventing the handler from running multiple times with nested elements. – jmar777 Apr 8 '13 at 18:30

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