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I have been thinking of send a proposal to the Java language architects.

In a synchronized block

synchronized(lock) {

// If there is no notification before this point
// <--- implicitly put here // lock.notifyAll(); // OR // lock.notify();  
}

After a thread left synchronized block, it cannot call lock.notifyAll() / lock.notify() anymore without getting exception.

Forgetting to notify other thread monitor holders may forever make them (other threads) wait (unless, they put some timeout in their wait method).

synchronized(lock) {

     lock.wait(); //<--- this thread may forever freeze here
}

I cannot imagine a situation in which such behavior (inserting implicit notification at the end of a synchronized block, when there is no explicit notification) is undesirable.

The same approach can be applied to synchronized methods.


There can be different ways how to (technically) implement such behavior, for example:

@autonotify
synchronized(lock) {
...
}

@autonotify
public void synchronized doSomething() {
...
}

Or:

@autonotifyAll
synchronized(lock) {
...
}

@autonotifyAll
public void synchronized doSomething() {
...
}

Or - make auto-notification the default behavior, but leaving ability to suppress it, for example:

@suppressautonotify
synchronized(lock) {
...
}

@suppressautonotifyAll
public void synchronized doSomething() {
...
}

What do you think? Objections?

The best commentary for or against the proposal will be accepted as the answer.

share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by Gray, Mark Rotteveel, Karna, fglez, Graviton Apr 11 '13 at 6:18

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There are a lot of cases where doing this would result in bugs (or at least, unneeded wakeups when the wait condition hasn't been fulfilled). Not all synchronization is done to notify the monitor. –  Mark Rotteveel Apr 8 '13 at 19:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Doing it automatically or by default is a big no-no. There are many situations where you synchronize on a lock without wanting to notify at the end of the synchronized block. Doing so would break a whole lot of existing programs.

And why do it with @autonotifyAll instead of doing it with a simple lock.notifyAll() at the end of the synchronized block. If you forget to call lock.notifyAll(), you have as many chances to forget @autonotifyAll. And it would make things less readable, and less consistent.

The best practice, anyway, is to avoid using these very low-level methods, and to use higher-level abstractions, like blocking queues, countdown latches, semaphores, etc.

If I had to decide, your suggestion would be rejected.

share|improve this answer
    
That's what I thought, too - changing the behavior to auto-nofity will break existing applications. May be that's the main argument NOT to do it. –  Alex Kreutznaer Apr 8 '13 at 19:17
    
But, the question still remains - can you imagine a situation when leaving a synchronized block without notify() or notifyAll() is justified? I cannot. –  Alex Kreutznaer Apr 8 '13 at 19:18
2  
Yes, in 99% of the cases, when you synchronize only to ensure a mutual exclusion. Look at the source of java.util.Vector for example. All its methods are synchronized, and there is zero call to notify or notifyAll inside. –  JB Nizet Apr 8 '13 at 19:20
    
The difference between autonotifyAll and lock.notifyAll() is that if you throw an exception, lock.notifyAll() may be skipped, but autonotifyAll may be implemented in a way similar to finally block behavior. –  Alex Kreutznaer Apr 8 '13 at 19:22
1  
@AlexKreutznaer There already is a way to do synchronized(lock) {} finally {}. It's just very slightly different than the syntax you want: synchronized(lock) { try {...} finally {...} } –  yshavit Apr 8 '13 at 19:31

Object.wait and Object.notify/All are considered pretty low-level mechanisms for synchronization; most of the time, you'll want to use higher-level constructs like those found in java.util.concurrent or its sub-packages. If your use case is subtle or special enough that you need to use these Object methods rather than the higher-level tools that the JDK people have built, tested and optimized for you -- well then, you probably want full control, and hopefully (for the users of your code) you can handle it.

To use a driving metaphor, this question is the equivalent of buying a car with a manual transmission instead of an automatic, and then asking the car manufacturer to automatically work the clutch for you when you want to switch gears.

share|improve this answer
    
Totally off topic, but a lot of cars on the market today have "paddle shifters" that do just that! ;-) (although admittedly they are not manual transmissions) –  The111 Sep 15 '13 at 6:26

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