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Suppose we have a class like this:

public class xx {

    public interface Foo<T> {
        T getValue();
        void setValue(T value);
    }

    public void resetFoos(Iterable<Foo<?>> foos) {
        for (Foo<?> foo : foos)
            foo.setValue(foo.getValue());
    }
}

It will fail to compile even though intuitively it seems like it "should":

xx.java:10: setValue(capture#496 of ?) in xx.Foo<capture#496 of ?> cannot be applied to (java.lang.Object)
        foo.setValue(foo.getValue());

The reason is that foo does not have a bound generic type, so the compiler doesn't "know" that the output of foo.getValue() is compatible with the input of foo.setValue().

So to fix this you have to create a new method just for the purpose of binding the generic type parameter in the for() loop:

public class xx {

    public interface Foo<T> {
        T getValue();
        void setValue(T value);
    }

    public void resetFoos(Iterable<Foo<?>> foos) {
        for (Foo<?> foo : foos)
            this.resetFoo(foo);
    }

    // stupid extra method here just to bind <T>
    private <T> void resetFoo(Foo<T> foo) {
        foo.setValue(foo.getValue());
    }
}

This has always annoyed me. Plus, it seems like there can be a simple solution.

My question: Is there any "good" reason why the java language shouldn't be extended to allow generic type declarations on variable declarations? For example:

public class xx {

    public interface Foo<T> {
        T getValue();
        void setValue(T value);
    }

    public void resetFoos(Iterable<Foo<?>> foos) {
        for (Foo<?> foo : foos) {
            final <T> Foo<T> typedFoo = foo;
            foo.setValue(foo.getValue());
        }
    }
}

or, more concisely in this case of a for() loop:

public class xx {

    public interface Foo<T> {
        T getValue();
        void setValue(T value);
    }

    public void resetFoos(Iterable<Foo<?>> foos) {
        for (<T> Foo<?> foo : foos)
            foo.setValue(foo.getValue());
    }
}

I'm wondering if some compiler wizard can explain why this would either be too hard, or can (and should) be done.

EDIT:

In response to this suggested solution:

public <T> void resetFoos(Iterable<Foo<T>> foos) {
    for (Foo<T> foo : foos) {
        foo.setValue(foo.getValue());
    }
}

This method signature doesn't allow Foos with various generic types to be reset together. In other words, trying to pass in an Iterable<Foo<?>> causes a compile error.

This example demonstrates the problem:

public static class FooImpl<T> implements Foo<T> {

    private T value;

    public FooImpl(T value) { this.value = value; }

    @Override public T getValue() { return value; }

    @Override public void setValue(T value) { this.value = value; }
}

public static <T> void resetFoos(Iterable<Foo<T>> foos) {
    for (Foo<T> foo : foos) {
        foo.setValue(foo.getValue());
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args) {

    final Foo<Object> objFoo = new FooImpl<>(new Object());
    final Foo<Integer> numFoo = new FooImpl<>(new Integer(42));
    final Foo<String> strFoo = new FooImpl<>("asdf");

    List<Foo<?>> foos = new ArrayList<>(3);
    foos.add(objFoo);
    foos.add(numFoo);
    foos.add(strFoo);

    resetFoos(foos); // compile error

    System.out.println("done");
}

The compile error reads:

method resetFoos cannot be applied to given types;

required: Iterable<Foo<T>>

found: List<Foo<?>>

reason: no instance(s) of type variable(s) T exist so that argument type List<Foo<?>> conforms to formal parameter type Iterable<Foo<T>> where T is a type-variable: T extends Object declared in method <T>resetFoos(Iterable<Foo<T>>)

(using sun-jdk-1.7.0_10 via ideone.com)

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Why not use public <T> void resetFoos(Iterable<Foo<T>> foos) {...}? –  Howard Apr 8 '13 at 19:34
1  
Folks, Iterable<Foo<T>> != Iterable<Foo<?>> –  Archie Apr 8 '13 at 19:42
1  
@Archie What's your point? We're wondering why you don't want to use that solution. –  Paul Bellora Apr 8 '13 at 20:00
1  
Because it doesn't solve the case of Iterable<Foo<?>>. Not all the Foo objects in the Iterable can be assumed to have the same generic type. This situation does occur in real life. –  Archie Apr 8 '13 at 23:11
    
@Archie I see what you mean. I've updated your question with an example of the problem you're implying. In the future please make the effort to do that yourself so the issue is clear to everyone. –  Paul Bellora Apr 9 '13 at 0:29
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Basically, type variables can only currently have two scopes in Java: 1) class scope, or 2) method scope. You're asking, why not allow another scope -- scope of a local block of code (in this case, the inside of a for loop.

Yes, in some cases this would be helpful. And it would be not too hard to add it to the language. However, these are pretty rare cases, and is more likely to confuse people than help. Also, a relatively simple and effective workaround exists, as you have already discovered -- move that local block scope to a private helper function, which can then use a method-scope type variable:

public void resetFoos(Iterable<Foo<?>> foos) {
    for (Foo<?> foo : foos) {
        resetFoo(foo);
    }
}

private <T> void resetFoo(Foo<T> foo) {
    foo.setValue(foo.getValue());
}

Yes, this might make the code less efficient by making extra method calls, but that is a minor concern.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for restating my question more clearly. BTW it's not performance that is the problem in my opinion, it's code verbosity/clarity. –  Archie Apr 9 '13 at 19:33
    
without some concrete details, it's unclear what you and Archie are proposing, and why you guys think it'll be easy. but the workaround through method invocation depends on type inference in method invocation expressions, there's nothing like that for a local scope. –  zhong.j.yu Apr 9 '13 at 19:49
    
@zhong.j.yu: it actually depends on capture –  newacct Apr 9 '13 at 20:22
    
capture happens regardless. the key is to convert the undenotable type variable introduced by capture conversion to a denotable type variable through method invocation type inference. –  zhong.j.yu Apr 9 '13 at 21:46
1  
@zhong.j.yu: yes, whatever type inference and capture conversion is happening when you call the helper method, why can't we add a new construct to the language that does the exact same conversion when initializing a local variable? –  newacct Apr 9 '13 at 23:16
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You can make the resetFoos method itself generic:

public <T> void resetFoos(Iterable<Foo<T>> foos) {
    for ( Foo<T> foo : foos)
        foo.setValue(foo.getValue());
}

That way the compiler knows that the T from foo.getValue() is the same T for foo.setValue().

That's just the workaround. I do not know why the compiler doesn't let you declare generics at a variable level such as final <T> Foo<T> typedFoo = foo;; I just know that you can't declare it at the variable level. However, here, the method level is sufficient.

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1  
Doesn't really answer the question. –  Paul Bellora Apr 8 '13 at 19:34
2  
but then every Foo has to have the same type parameter –  Geoff Reedy Apr 8 '13 at 19:35
2  
@rgettman, I mean that every Foo in the iterable needs the same type parameter –  Geoff Reedy Apr 8 '13 at 19:39
2  
@GeoffReedy T isn't bounded - it could be Object. But to your point the method should really take Iterable<? extends Foo<T>>. –  Paul Bellora Apr 8 '13 at 20:01
2  
@yshavit The T in the resetFoos method doesn't shadow the T of the Foo type per se, because the resetFoos method is outside the Foo interface. –  matts Apr 8 '13 at 20:21
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It probably could be done, possibly with some edge cases. But really, the reason it's not done is simply that the JLS people stopped short of doing it.

A type system isn't going to be able to infer everything about your program. It'll do a bunch, but there'll always be some place where a compiler/type checker won't know something that you the human can prove. So, the people who design compilers and type checkers have to decide how far to go in terms of inferring and being clever -- and no matter where they stop, someone will always be able to pose a question like this one: "why didn't they go this extra step?"

My guess -- and it's only a guess -- is that this inference didn't make it because of some mix of (a) it's easy to work around (as rgettman shows), (b) it complicates the language, (b.1) it introduces tricky edge cases, some of which may even be incompatible with other features of the language, (c) the designers of the JLS didn't feel they had time to work on it.

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1  
I'm not asking the compiler to infer anything. I'm asking the compiler to let me tell it something. –  Archie Apr 8 '13 at 19:44
    
The usual rule for generics is that if you have a Foo<T> with a method setFoo(T foo), then you can't pass anything but null to Foo<?>. This rule is absolutely necessary in general, but you're asking the compiler to make an exception to that rule in the specific case where the non-null argument comes directly from getFoo(). –  yshavit Apr 8 '13 at 19:58
1  
You're still not understanding what I'm asking. foo.setValue(foo.getValue()) works fine - if the generic type of foo is bound. My example shows how to do that by creating a new method that gives the type a bound name. I'm simply wondering why the JLS doesn't provide for a more convenient way to bind it that doesn't involve having to write a new method. –  Archie Apr 9 '13 at 1:23
1  
No, I am understanding. But my point is that the JLS has to draw the line somewhere. If foo.setValue(foo.getValue()) works, what about Object o = foo.getValue(); foo.setValue(o);? It would after all be the same trick to allow the first as the second, and it's a similar trick to Java 7's rethrow improvements (where the compiler "downcasts" Exception in certain cases), so there's precedent. Where does it end? No matter where you stop being clever, there'll always be a slightly-less-trivial example that you could point to and say "if you allow A, why not A'?" –  yshavit Apr 9 '13 at 2:19
    
Sorry, I guess I just don't understand why you don't understand me :) Maybe I should have qualified previous comment by saying: foo.setValue(foo.getValue()) works but only when foo has type Foo<T> instead of Foo<?>. I'm not suggesting changing any of that behavior; I'm asking for a more convenient way to declare a T to bind to, creating a new Foo<T> typed variable from a Foo<?> one, without creating a new method. –  Archie Apr 9 '13 at 14:24
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Every change to java language will be very hard.

Your example is not really about the need of a type variable. The compiler already creates a type variable through wildcard capture, it's just that the type variable isn't available to the programmer. There might be several remedies

  1. let the programmer access the type variable. This isn't an easy task. We need to invent some bizzare syntax and semantics. The weirdness and complexity may not justify the benefit.

  2. shared capture conversion. Right now, every expression goes through capture conversion separately. The spec does not recognize that foo is foo so the two expressions should share the same capture conversion. It is doable on some simple cases, for example, an effectively final local variable should be capture-converted only once, not on every access.

  3. inferred variable type - var foo2 = foo; The type of foo2is inferred from the right hand side, which actually undergoes capture conversion first, therefore foo2's type will be Foo<x> for some x, with a new type variable x (still undenotable). Or use var directly on foo - for(var foo: foos). Inferred variable type is a mature/tested technique, and its benefit is far broader than solving this problem. So I'll vote for this one. It might be coming in java 9, if we can live that long.

share|improve this answer
    
It would be even better if the compiler would infer things. I'm asking for something simpler (I think), just a way for me to declare and bind a type in a variable declaration in exactly the same way you can already do so in a method declaration. –  Archie Apr 9 '13 at 1:26
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The problem is that in the statement in question:

foo.setValue(foo.getValue());

the two occurrences of ? can (as far as the compiler knows) be bound to different types. It may seem silly that the compiler can't figure out that one ? (that is returned by getValue()) isn't the same as the ? that is expected in setValue. But in other situations, the result is not so clear-cut. The language requires that type parameters be named the same if they are supposed to be the same.

A fine workaround is provided in rgettman's answer.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not asking for an explanation of the current behavior. Nor am I asking for a workaround (which doesn't work by the way). –  Archie Apr 8 '13 at 19:52
    
@Archie - It's not clear exactly what you are asking. However, I've modified my answer to address what I think you might be driving at. –  Ted Hopp Apr 8 '13 at 20:06
    
See my update to the question in case you want to edit/respond further. –  Paul Bellora Apr 9 '13 at 0:31
1  
I don't think you're right. Iterable<Foo<?>> means "iteration of Foos, each of which has an unknown generic type". Otherwise how do you explain why this compiles cleanly (which it does): HashSet<Set<?>> set = new HashSet<Set<?>>(); set.add(new HashSet<Float>()); set.add(new HashSet<Integer>());. –  Archie Apr 9 '13 at 1:20
1  
"In particular, Iterable<Foo<?>> means "an Iterable of Foo objects with a fixed but unknown parameterized type"." This is incorrect. It is exactly an iterable whose elements can be Foo of different parameterized types. –  newacct Apr 9 '13 at 2:07
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