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I know I can get any file by type in a directory tree with

dir /s /b *.ext > list.txt

or any subdirectory by name with

dir /s/b *directoryName* >list.txt

but how do I combine this to get a list of files by type AND sub-directory name?

 dir /s /b *directoryname\*.ext
>>The filename, directory name, or volume label syntax is incorrect.
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4 Answers 4

I may have understood but cant you just do:

dir /s /b "SubfolderName\*.ext"

?

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this solution is not recursive –  Logan Bender Apr 9 '13 at 17:31

If you want full recursion you can use findstr to whittle away what you don't need from a full dir /b /s.

dir /s /b | findstr /i "directoryname.*\.ext$" >list.txt

... will match .ext files in any directory containing directoryname (including directoryname01 or 01 - directoryname), where the directory may be more than one level deep from the current directory.

In the findstr search regexp, the .* after directoryname signifies 0 or more of any character. In glob syntax it's like *directoryname*.ext. See help findstr for more info on findstr syntax.

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dir /s /b /a-d *.ext|findstr /i /r ".*\\.*dirname.*\\.*"

The /a-d suppresses directorynames matching the .ext mask - filenames only.
The /r on the findstr is probably superfluous, as regex is default
The /i forces case-insentitivity
The string-to-match is

[any number of any characters]\[any number of any characters][directoryname][any number of any characters]\[any number of any characters]

since \ escapes \

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read HELP FOR and try this in a command line

for /D %a in (dirname*) do @dir /s /b %a*.ext

for /R /D %a in (dirname*) do @dir /s /b %a\*.ext 1>>list.txt 2>nul
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this solution is not recursive –  Logan Bender Apr 9 '13 at 17:32
    
you are right, edited to include /R to make FOR recursive, now it is. –  PA. Apr 9 '13 at 17:53

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