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I know the below SQL statement is completely wrong but I hope it gives an example of what I want to do. I have a users table, a payments (user payments not order payments) table and an orders table. I want to select 10 random users who have made 6 or more payments to us, who have not made any orders yet.

In the payments table there are multiple rows for each user for each payment they have made. In the orders table it's the same, but it contains completed and uncompleted orders and i'm looking for users who don't have any completed orders so o.order_status must be 0 for ALL orders in the orders table.

I hope that makes sense and if you need any more info let me know and i'll update the post. Appreciate the help.

SELECT u.*, COUNT(p.id) as payment_count, COUNT(o.id) as order_count
                    FROM users as u
                    INNER JOIN payments as p
                    ON u.id = p.user_id
                    INNER JOIN orders as o
                    ON u.id = o.user_id
                    WHERE o.order_status = 0
                    AND COUNT(p.id) > 6
                    AND COUNT(o.id) = 0
                    ORDER BY RAND()
                    LIMIT 10
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HAVING is a useful option for COUNT(column)># - w3schools.com/sql/sql_having.asp And GROUP BY is required for COUNT() but can cause difficulties with SELECT * if done incorrectly. –  David Starkey Apr 8 '13 at 20:46
    
It would speed things up if you pasted the SQL DDL for your tables, and some INSERT statements that populated those tables with a little representative data. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Apr 8 '13 at 20:47
    
A few reading for you about SQL Joins –  leonardo_assumpcao Apr 8 '13 at 21:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're actually quite close with your query. As mentioned by others, use GROUP BY and HAVING and you're most of the way there. In addition, outer-join to orders and include the 'order_status = 0' check in the join to help accomplish the 'no orders with status of zero' requirement. The result:

SELECT 
    u.id, 
    COUNT(p.id) as payment_count, 
    COUNT(o.id) as order_count
FROM users as u
    INNER JOIN payments as p
        ON u.id = p.user_id
    LEFT OUTER JOIN orders as o
        ON u.id = o.user_id
            AND o.order_status = 0
GROUP BY u.id
HAVING COUNT(p.id) >= 6
    AND COUNT(o.id) = 0
ORDER BY RAND()
LIMIT 10

You'll have to include other columns from the users table in the GROUP BY if you want to include them in the SELECT. Also, it's probably just an oversight, but you'll want >= 6 (not > 6) for the first part of the HAVING clause too.

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Thank you very much, this works perfectly. Although it was down to my bad coding, i'm actually looking for o.order_status = 1 then ensuring the count is 0 so that there are no completed orders. –  Wasim Apr 9 '13 at 8:41

Without doing a deep dive into your code, to filter by COUNT or the result of any aggregate function, you need to use a HAVING clause.

It looks like you are also lacking GROUP BY clauses. I would read up on HAVING and GROUP BY as a first step.

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