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var myObj = {
    name:"mike",
    go:function(){
        console.log(this.name);
    }

}

myObj.go()   //logs out mike
setTimeout(this.myObj.go,200)  //logs out (emptyString)
share|improve this question
    
@adeneo The this pointer would not be set that way (well, it'd reference the global object in non-strict mode). –  Fabrício Matté Apr 8 '13 at 21:18
    
possible duplicate of Pass correct "this" context to setTimeout callback? –  Fabrício Matté Apr 8 '13 at 21:24
    
@adeneo Totally wrong. –  Tomáš Zato Apr 8 '13 at 22:10
2  
this isn't context. It's a special variable that is set by the call and can be any object (es3) or any value (es5 strict mode). –  RobG Apr 8 '13 at 23:37

6 Answers 6

Define a variable reffering to the object before:

var _this = this;
setTimeout(function() {_this.myObj.go();}, 200);
share|improve this answer
1  
This is the most complete solution code, though OP seems to be using this to reference the global context, otherwise a variable declared through var would hardly be assigned to a property of an object. –  Fabrício Matté Apr 8 '13 at 21:23
1  
@FabrícioMatté Yeah the weird part is why they're referencing it with this, when they declare it with var. I think this method would be necessary if this was something specific to the context and was needed. –  Ian Apr 8 '13 at 21:26
    
@Ian Exactly. =] Finished reading answers, time to spend some upvotes then. –  Fabrício Matté Apr 8 '13 at 21:27
var myObj = {
    name:"mike",
    go:function(){
        console.log(this.name);
    }

}

setTimeout(function(){myObj.go()},200)
share|improve this answer
    
I beat you to editing :P stackoverflow.com/posts/15889184/revisions –  Doorknob Apr 8 '13 at 21:19
    
Ahah, i saw it :P –  simple-thomas Apr 8 '13 at 21:20

Try this:

setTimeout(function(){
  myObj.go();
},200);
share|improve this answer

Try this

var myObj = {
    name:"mike",
    go:function(){
        console.log(this.name);
    }

}

myObj.go();   //logs out mike
setTimeout(function(){
    myObj.go(); //logs out mike too
},200);
share|improve this answer

Several ways:

setTimeout(this.myObj.go.bind(this.myObj), 200);

or

var that = this;
setTimeout(function () {
    that.myObj.go();
}, 200);

Note that .bind isn't supported in older browsers, so a polyfill may be required in order to support it. Here's some information about the method: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Function/bind

share|improve this answer
    
Note that .bind has been introduced in ES5, therefore to support older browsers one should either use your version with a function wrapper or a .bind shim. –  Fabrício Matté Apr 8 '13 at 21:28
    
@FabrícioMatté Yeah, thanks for pointing it out - I didn't feel compelled enough to include that :) I'm wondering when it's going to be time that we stop pointing out when old browsers don't support certain methods. Probably never, as people will use old IE forever... –  Ian Apr 8 '13 at 21:32
    
Well, guess I'm one of the few which still spends sleepless nights patching my HTML5 page to be fallbackable to IE6 (yeah really) but well, I believe there isn't much use in supporting IE<8 so I'm slowly migrating and removing old IE hacks. None from us want to restrict ourselves from using advanced HTML5/CSS3 features just because of old IE, so my methodology now is just to apply graceful degradation down to IE8 tops. And yeah, IE8 doesn't support .bind() and it'd generate an ugly JS error breaking script execution. :P –  Fabrício Matté Apr 8 '13 at 21:37

Your code is right minus a few things.

setTimeout(this.myObj.go,200)

Should be

setTimeout(function() {myObj.go()},200)

It was undefined because this.myObj was not in the scope of setTimeout, nor was it wrapped in an anonymous function, or a variable function. You were on the right track though!

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